Cathlapotle Plankhouse

Click to enlarge Click to enlarge Click to enlarge Click to enlarge
Click here to see pictures of the construction process from the beginning.

Cathlapotle Plankhouse Spring Opening Celebration, April 13, 2014


Click above for more info.

Volunteer Opportunities
April 5, 2014

Volunteer Opportunities
Click above for more details.

       
         

March 29, 2008 - Meriwether Lewis Enactment


Click above for pictures.

October 2007 - BirdFest Events


Click above for pictures.

October 14, 2006 - BirdFest Events


Click above for pictures.

November 5, 2005 - Cathlapotle Event


Click above for pictures.

October 16, 2005 - BirdFest Lecture


Click above for pictures.

June 26, 2005 - Plankhouse Lecture Series


Click above for pictures.

May 22, 2005 - Plankhouse Lecture Series


Click above for pictures.

March 29, 2005 - Cathlapotle Media Event and Public Open House


Click above for pictures.

Click here for the official web site.


U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service


Cathlapotle Plankhouse Fact Sheet



Plankhouse: Modern full-size replica of a typical Chinookan-style cedar plankhouse like those occupied by Native Americans at Cathlapotle and other towns along the lower Columbia River for thousands of years.

Cathlapotle: (pronounced kath-lah-poh-tul) Chinookan town located near the confluence of Lake River, Lewis River and the Columbia River that was observed by explorers Lewis and Clark on November 5, 1805 and visited by them on March 29, 1806. Lewis and Clark reported 14 houses and estimated the population at 900 people.

Location: Carty Unit, Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge -one mile north of downtown Ridgefield, Washington, on North Main Avenue.

Purpose: Serve as an outdoor classroom for interpreting the refuge's rich natural and cultural heritage.

Size: 37 feet X 78 feet - 2,886 square feet; Center ridgepole is 21 feet above floor level.

Number of Logs: At least 246 logs from 115 western red-cedar trees, many donated by location residents and the Gifford Pinchot and Mount Hood national forests, were used in construction.

Carvings: Designed by Tony Johnson (Chinook Tribe); Carved by Johnson and Adam MacIssac (La Center, Washington)

Project Timeframe: Began with first grants and donations in 2002; Completion expected in 2006.

Number of Volunteers: 100+

Volunteer Hours: 3,500 to date.

Number of Donors: 50+

Total Value of Donations: Approximately $575,000

Partners: The Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Committee of Vancouver/Clark County has provided fiscal sponsorship. The Chinook Tribe and Portland State University have provided cultural authenticity and technical expertise.

Major Donors: National Park Service, Meyer Memorial Trust, M. J. Murdock Charitable Trust, Hugh and Jane Ferguson Foundation, Gladys Hare, U.S.D,A. Forest Service, Washington Department of Transportation. Washington State Historical Society, City of Vancouver, Friends of Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Edward and Dollie Lynce, Jerry and Jan Beale, and the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Click here to go to Lewis River Bed and Breakfast.
Click above to go to Lewis River Bed & Breakfast.

Area Web Sites Area Web Sites


Back to Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge

Back to Ridgefield

| Home | | About | | Events | | Photo Album | | Newsletters | | History | | Resources |

Web site owned by NWNature.com Inc. Inquiries to Noel Johnson.

Site designed and maintained by
Farnell Web Design