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Sturgeon retention allowed for 2 days on Columbia River below Bonneville Dam Action: Allows retention of white sturgeon for two days on the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam. Effective Dates: Oct. 21 and Oct. 26, 2017. Species affected: White sturgeon. Locations: On the mainstem Columbia River, from the Wauna power lines (40 miles from the mouth of the Columbia) upstream to Bonneville Dam Reason for action: There are sufficient sturgeon remaining under the guideline to allow for a two-day retention fishery. Other information: Anglers will have a daily retention limit of one fish measuring 44 to 50 inches from its snout to the fork in its tail. An annual limit of two white sturgeon, regardless of where they are caught, will also be in effect. The mainstem Columbia River remains open for catch-and-release sturgeon fishing. Information Contact: Region 5, Olaf Langness; 360-696-6741. Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list. Visit the Emergency Fishing Rule Website at: https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/ To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html - 9:56 a.m. 10/13/2017
Sturgeon retention allowed for 2 days
on
Columbia River below Bonneville Dam

Action: Allows retention of white
sturgeon for two days on the Columbia
River below Bonneville Dam.

Effective Dates: Oct. 21 and Oct.
26, 2017.

Species affected: White sturgeon.

Locations: On the mainstem Columbia
River, from the Wauna power lines (40
miles from the mouth of the Columbia)
upstream to Bonneville Dam

Reason for action: There are
sufficient sturgeon remaining under
the guideline to allow for a two-day
retention fishery.

Other information: Anglers will have
a daily retention limit of one fish
measuring 44 to 50 inches from its
snout to the fork in its tail. An
annual limit of two white sturgeon,
regardless of where they are caught,
will also be in effect.

The mainstem Columbia River remains
open for catch-and-release sturgeon
fishing.

Information Contact: Region 5, Olaf
Langness; 360-696-6741.

Fishers must have a current
Washington fishing license,
appropriate to the fishery. Check the
WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules
pamphlet for details on fishing
seasons and regulations. Fishing
rules are subject to change. Check
the WDFW Fishing hotline for the
latest rule information at (360) 902-
2500, press 2 for recreational rules.
For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline
call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-
866-880-5431.
Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
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------

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WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the Emergency Fishing Rule
Website at:
https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/ef
ishrules/
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing
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Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

First razor clam dig of season set Oct. 6-7 OLYMPIA The first razor clam dig of the fall season will get underway Oct. 6-7 at four ocean beaches. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has approved the dig on evening tides at Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis and Mocrocks after marine toxin tests showed that clams on those beaches are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed on any beach before noon. The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates and evening low tides: Oct. 6, Friday, 7:49 p.m.; -0.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks Oct. 7, Saturday, 8:33 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, recommends that diggers hit the beach about an hour or two before low tide for the best results. Before receiving the test results, Ayres said he had received a number of calls from diggers about an erroneous newspaper story that suggested that ocean beaches would remain closed to digging. "A map on the Washington Department of Health's website indicates that beaches are closed to razor clam digging up until they are cleared to open by the test results," Ayres said. "We're pleased that we are able to move ahead with this opening as scheduled." A recent statement in a story about Pierce County's shellfish ban might have caused some confusion among razor clam diggers. While it's true that the Washington coast has been closed to clam digging, that closure could be superseded by favorable results from a marine toxin test, due as early as Oct. 3. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife will post the results of that test at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html. WDFW has tentatively scheduled another dig for Nov. 2-5, pending results of future toxin tests. More information on planned digs can be found on WDFW's razor clam webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html. All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2017-18 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW's website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state. Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger's clams must be kept in a separate container. Ayres noted that throughout the 2017-18 razor clam season, a research team from the University of Maryland will be out on the beaches seeking volunteers to participate in a survey about razor clam consumption and harvesting practices. For more information, contact Lynn Grattan at 877-668-4559 or LGrattan@som.umaryland.edu. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list. Visit the WDFW News Release Archive at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/ To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html - 4:27 p.m. 10/3/2017
First razor clam dig of season set
Oct. 6-7

OLYMPIA The first razor clam dig of
the fall season will get underway
Oct. 6-7 at four ocean beaches.

The Washington Department of Fish and
Wildlife (WDFW) has approved the dig
on evening tides at Long Beach, Twin
Harbors, Copalis and Mocrocks after
marine toxin tests showed that clams
on those beaches are safe to eat. No
digging will be allowed on any beach
before noon.

The upcoming dig is approved on the
following beaches, dates and evening
low tides:

Oct. 6, Friday, 7:49 p.m.; -0.4 feet;
Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis,
Mocrocks
Oct. 7, Saturday, 8:33 p.m.; -0.7
feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors,
Copalis, Mocrocks
Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish
manager, recommends that diggers hit
the beach about an hour or two before
low tide for the best results.

Before receiving the test results,
Ayres said he had received a number
of calls from diggers about an
erroneous newspaper story that
suggested that ocean beaches would
remain closed to digging.

"A map on the Washington Department
of Health's website indicates that
beaches are closed to razor clam
digging up until they are cleared to
open by the test results," Ayres
said. "We're pleased that we are able
to move ahead with this opening as
scheduled."

A recent statement in a story about
Pierce County's shellfish ban might
have caused some confusion among
razor clam diggers. While it's true
that the Washington coast has been
closed to clam digging, that closure
could be superseded by favorable
results from a marine toxin test, due
as early as Oct. 3. The Washington
Department of Fish and Wildlife will
post the results of that test at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/
razorclams/current.html.

WDFW has tentatively scheduled
another dig for Nov. 2-5, pending
results of future toxin tests. More
information on planned digs can be
found on WDFW's razor clam webpage at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/
razorclams/current.html.

All diggers age 15 or older must have
an applicable 2017-18 fishing license
to harvest razor clams on any beach.
Licenses, ranging from a three-day
razor clam license to an annual
combination fishing license, are
available on WDFW's website at
https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from
license vendors around the state.

Under state law, diggers at open
beaches can take 15 razor clams per
day and are required to keep the
first 15 they dig. Each digger's
clams must be kept in a separate
container.

Ayres noted that throughout the 2017-
18 razor clam season, a research team
from the University of Maryland will
be out on the beaches seeking
volunteers to participate in a survey
about razor clam consumption and
harvesting practices. For more
information, contact Lynn Grattan at
877-668-4559 or
LGrattan@som.umaryland.edu.

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to the
WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the WDFW News Release Archive
at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing
list:
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.
html

Noel E Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Lewis coho - 9:52 a.m. 10/3/2017
Drifted from Woodland to Perkins Ferry tossing spinners and plugs. A few hits resulting in a hatchery king and one wild coho. Saw a fair number of coho rolling just not biting well.

Mike Humes - Ridgefield, WA
99butterbeans@gmail.com
http://www.lewisriver.com/fishingreports/index.cgi?action=add_form

Swift - 3:49 p.m. 10/2/2017
Good day at swift today. 2 limits of rainbows.
In 2 and half hours. Nice 12 to 15 inchers.
Went old school ford fenders and wedding
rings. 1 ounce and 50 to 75ft back. Garlic corn
and worms worked well. We did pick some up
on my Kokanee setups. Dodger and hootchie.
Mainly on the south side of the lake before the
island. Back to salmon fishing now. Tight lines.

Jerry - Woodland
Jdbro123@icloud.com

Head outdoors for deer, waterfowl and salmon Some of Washington's most popular hunting seasons get underway in October, when hunters take to the field for deer, elk, ducks, geese and other game birds. Meanwhile, anglers are catching fall chinook salmon in areas of the Columbia River, Snake River and Puget Sound. Popular outdoor opportunities this month include: Waterfowl: Migratory waterfowl are expected to make a strong showing this year. Hunters should expect great hunting this year, depending on weather. Columbia River salmon: The bulk of this year's Columbia River fall chinook run has now moved past Bonneville Dam, invigorating fisheries at Drano Lake, the Klickitat River and farther upstream. But there are still opportunities to catch some nice fish in the lower Columbia River. Puget Sound-area salmon: Salmon fishing continues this fall in several marine areas of Puget Sound, as well as rivers throughout the region. Big game: The harsh winter of 2016-17 appears to have taken a toll on some elk and deer populations especially in parts of eastern Washington. But hunting prospects in many areas still look promising as hunts get underway this fall. Fall migration: Migrating birds, such as sandhill cranes and Canada geese, can be spotted by wildlife-watchers at a variety of spots across Washington. For more information about fishing, hunting and wildlife-viewing opportunities available this month, see the Weekender Regional Reports posted on WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/weekender/index.html. These reports are updated throughout the month to provide current information about recreational opportunities around the state. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to WDFW All Information Visit the Weekender Report Archive at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/weekender To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html - 9:34 a.m. 9/30/2017
Head outdoors for deer, waterfowl and
salmon

Some of Washington's most popular
hunting seasons get underway in
October, when hunters take to the
field for deer, elk, ducks, geese and
other game birds.

Meanwhile, anglers are catching fall
chinook salmon in areas of the
Columbia River, Snake River and Puget
Sound.

Popular outdoor opportunities this
month include:

Waterfowl: Migratory waterfowl are
expected to make a strong showing
this year. Hunters should expect
great hunting this year, depending on
weather.
Columbia River salmon: The bulk of
this year's Columbia River fall
chinook run has now moved past
Bonneville Dam, invigorating
fisheries at Drano Lake, the
Klickitat River and farther upstream.
But there are still opportunities to
catch some nice fish in the lower
Columbia River.
Puget Sound-area salmon: Salmon
fishing continues this fall in
several marine areas of Puget Sound,
as well as rivers throughout the
region.
Big game: The harsh winter of 2016-17
appears to have taken a toll on some
elk and deer populations especially
in parts of eastern Washington. But
hunting prospects in many areas still
look promising as hunts get underway
this fall.
Fall migration: Migrating birds, such
as sandhill cranes and Canada geese,
can be spotted by wildlife-watchers
at a variety of spots across
Washington.
For more information about fishing,
hunting and wildlife-viewing
opportunities available this month,
see the Weekender Regional Reports
posted on WDFW's website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/weekender/index.ht
ml. These reports are updated
throughout the month to provide
current information about
recreational opportunities around the
state.

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to WDFW
All Information
Visit the Weekender Report Archive
at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/weekender
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing
list:
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.
html

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
Head outdoors for deer, waterfowl and salmon Some of Washington's most popular hunting seasons get underway in October, when hunters take to the field for deer, elk, ducks, geese and other game birds. Meanwhile, anglers are catching fall chinook salmon in areas of the Columbia River, Snake River and Puget Sound. Popular outdoor opportunities this month include: Waterfowl: Migratory waterfowl are expected to make a strong showing this year. Hunters should expect great hunting this year, depending on weather. Columbia River salmon: The bulk of this year's Columbia River fall chinook run has now moved past Bonneville Dam, invigorating fisheries at Drano Lake, the Klickitat River and farther upstream. But there are still opportunities to catch some nice fish in the lower Columbia River. Puget Sound-area salmon: Salmon fishing continues this fall in several marine areas of Puget Sound, as well as rivers throughout the region. Big game: The harsh winter of 2016-17 appears to have taken a toll on some elk and deer populations especially in parts of eastern Washington. But hunting prospects in many areas still look promising as hunts get underway this fall. Fall migration: Migrating birds, such as sandhill cranes and Canada geese, can be spotted by wildlife-watchers at a variety of spots across Washington. For more information about fishing, hunting and wildlife-viewing opportunities available this month, see the Weekender Regional Reports posted on WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/weekender/index.html. These reports are updated throughout the month to provide current information about recreational opportunities around the state. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to WDFW All Information Visit the Weekender Report Archive at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/weekender To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html

Cowlitz, Green, North Fork Toutle rivers will close to chinook salmon fishing VANCOUVER, Wash. Starting Oct. 2, anglers will be required to release any chinook salmon they intercept on the Cowlitz, Green and North Fork Toutle rivers due to low returns of hatchery chinook. State fishery managers at the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) said the closures are necessary to ensure that enough fall chinook return to those rivers to support hatchery production during the coming year. All three rivers will remain open to retention of other fish species, as listed in the 2017 Sport Fishing Rules. "This was a tough decision for fishery managers, but we can't ignore the lagging chinook returns," said Dan Rawding, acting WDFW regional fish manager. "We have to think about producing fish for next year too." According to the pre-season forecast, 3,900 hatchery fall chinook were expected to cross Barrier Dam this year, with a goal of collecting 1,900 fish for hatchery broodstock. So far, only 700 chinook have returned to the river, and Rawding said fish managers are now hoping to get 1,400 back to the hatchery. The Cowlitz River remains open to fishing for coho salmon, summer steelhead, and sea-run cutthroat trout. On the Green River, only 400 chinook have been collected this year out of an expected return of 1,000 hatchery fish. The broodstock goal is 800 fish at the hatchery, which produces chinook returning to the Green and North Toutle rivers. Two other large Columbia River tributaries the Kalama and the Washougal will remain open to fishing for chinook salmon. There, too, chinook returns are lower than expected, but fishery managers still expect to meet hatchery broodstock goals on those rivers, Rawding said. Rawding said WDFW will continue to monitor salmon returns in area rivers, and will consider reopening rivers to chinook fishing if returns improve in the coming weeks. More information about these rule changes can be found on WDFW's website at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/ Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list. Visit the WDFW News Release Archive at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/ To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html - 9:32 a.m. 9/30/2017
Cowlitz, Green, North Fork Toutle
rivers
will close to chinook salmon fishing

VANCOUVER, Wash. Starting Oct. 2,
anglers will be required to release
any chinook salmon they intercept on
the Cowlitz, Green and North Fork
Toutle rivers due to low returns of
hatchery chinook.

State fishery managers at the
Washington Department of Fish and
Wildlife (WDFW) said the closures are
necessary to ensure that enough fall
chinook return to those rivers to
support hatchery production during
the coming year.

All three rivers will remain open to
retention of other fish species, as
listed in the 2017 Sport Fishing
Rules.

"This was a tough decision for
fishery managers, but we can't ignore
the lagging chinook returns," said
Dan Rawding, acting WDFW regional
fish manager. "We have to think about
producing fish for next year too."

According to the pre-season forecast,
3,900 hatchery fall chinook were
expected to cross Barrier Dam this
year, with a goal of collecting 1,900
fish for hatchery broodstock. So far,
only 700 chinook have returned to the
river, and Rawding said fish managers
are now hoping to get 1,400 back to
the hatchery.

The Cowlitz River remains open to
fishing for coho salmon, summer
steelhead, and sea-run cutthroat
trout.

On the Green River, only 400 chinook
have been collected this year out of
an expected return of 1,000 hatchery
fish. The broodstock goal is 800 fish
at the hatchery, which produces
chinook returning to the Green and
North Toutle rivers.

Two other large Columbia River
tributaries the Kalama and the
Washougal will remain open to
fishing for chinook salmon. There,
too, chinook returns are lower than
expected, but fishery managers still
expect to meet hatchery broodstock
goals on those rivers, Rawding said.

Rawding said WDFW will continue to
monitor salmon returns in area
rivers, and will consider reopening
rivers to chinook fishing if returns
improve in the coming weeks.

More information about these rule
changes can be found on WDFW's
website at
https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/ef
ishrules/

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to the
WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the WDFW News Release Archive
at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing
list:
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.
html

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Wallace River to reopen to fishing for coho, gamefish Action: Open the Wallace River to fishing. Effective dates: Sept. 30 through Nov. 30, 2017. Rules: From the mouth (farthest downstream railroad bridge) to 200 feet upstream of the water intake for the salmon hatchery. Night closure and anti-snagging rule in effect. Fishing from a floating device prohibited. Salmon: Limit of 3 coho only (release chinook, pink, and chum). Dolly varden/bull trout: Minimum size 20 inches, may be retained as part of the trout daily limit. Other trout: Minimum size 14 inches, daily limit 2. Other gamefish: Statewide minimum size/daily limit. From 200 feet upstream of the water intake for the salmon hatchery upstream to Wallace Falls, opens to fishing Nov. 1, as described in the 2017/2018 Sport Fishing Rules Pamphlet. Species affected: Coho salmon, gamefish. Closure locations: The Wallace River from the mouth upstream to Wallace Falls. Reason for action: The river was closed Sept. 16 to ensure that chinook broodstock goals were met at the Wallace Hatchery. Chinook broodstock goals have now been met. Additional Information: Pink salmon abundance remains below escapement goals, so pink salmon must be released. Under statewide general rules there is no fishing within 400 feet downstream of the hatchery weir. To insure future generations of fish, avoid stepping on redds (spawning nests) while fishing. Information contact: WDFW Region 4 Mill Creek Office, (425) 775-1311. Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431. Persons - 9:30 a.m. 9/30/2017
Wallace River to reopen to fishing
for coho, gamefish

Action: Open the Wallace River to
fishing.

Effective dates: Sept. 30 through
Nov. 30, 2017.

Rules:

From the mouth (farthest downstream
railroad bridge) to 200 feet upstream
of the water intake for the salmon
hatchery.

Night closure and anti-snagging rule
in effect.
Fishing from a floating device
prohibited.
Salmon: Limit of 3 coho only (release
chinook, pink, and chum).
Dolly varden/bull trout: Minimum size
20 inches, may be retained as part of
the trout daily limit.
Other trout: Minimum size 14 inches,
daily limit 2.
Other gamefish: Statewide minimum
size/daily limit.
From 200 feet upstream of the water
intake for the salmon hatchery
upstream to Wallace Falls, opens to
fishing Nov. 1, as described in the
2017/2018 Sport Fishing Rules
Pamphlet.

Species affected: Coho salmon,
gamefish.

Closure locations: The Wallace River
from the mouth upstream to Wallace
Falls.

Reason for action: The river was
closed Sept. 16 to ensure that
chinook broodstock goals were met at
the Wallace Hatchery. Chinook
broodstock goals have now been met.

Additional Information: Pink salmon
abundance remains below escapement
goals, so pink salmon must be
released. Under statewide general
rules there is no fishing within 400
feet downstream of the hatchery weir.
To insure future generations of fish,
avoid stepping on redds (spawning
nests) while fishing.

Information contact: WDFW Region 4
Mill Creek Office, (425) 775-1311.

Fishers must have a current
Washington fishing license,
appropriate to the fishery. Check the
WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules
pamphlet for details on fishing
seasons and regulations. Fishing
rules are subject to change. Check
the WDFW Fishing hotline for the
latest rule information at (360) 902-
2500, press 2 for recreational rules.
For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline
call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-
866-880-5431.
Persons

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

boat ramp - 6:38 p.m. 9/29/2017
does anyone know if the boatramp on
lower lewis near pekins ferry is open
yet

shawn - battleground wa
nwsteelheader@gmail.com

Fish?? - 12:42 a.m. 9/25/2017
I Jane been noticing there has not
been many reports this year. Do you
think it's because the fishing sucks
.they have had the Lewis running high
so that processing plant of hachery
can take all the fish well be for
there ready to spawn.traps are in all
test of the rivers .that is the ones
that still have hacheries.at
Bonneville the counts down to 2000
Chinook a day.the only time it was up
was when it was closed to the fire
they don't seem to want to put out.I
have personally only hooked two nooks
at frenchmans bar lost them both on
the bank due to barbess single hook
rule . while the damm fill matters
were stsgeing up in full force for
there anual fish kill .God bless
America. The worst part is in the
middle of the God damm country places
like Michigan where the salmon don't
belong the runs are huge.a friend of
said they were even getting in
Chicago where he is working. He's
thinking about staying there .the way
it's going I just might follow. Born
an raised here and this my opinion is
the worst it's ever been .not to
mention all the fishing holes are
being taken for housing for
califonians . fish and game doing
nothing but profiting like the rest
of the crooked polititions in this
state

Brian - Vancouver.washington
Gonefishin.bg@gmail.com

No Fish in the Lewis - 11:36 a.m. 9/23/2017
No fish reported at the
hatcheries(Kings or Coho). No fish
jumping. Looks to be pretty dismal.
The Lewis is in sad shape.

Jason Sanders - Woodland, WA

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For fishing pictures go to LewisRiver.com monthy fishing pictures.
For more information go to Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Call 1.800.547.1501 for updated reservoir levels and estimated river flow below Merwin.
For N. F . Lewis River flow go to River Flows At Ariel.
For East Fork Lewis River flow go to East Fork Lewis River Near Heisson, Wa.

Stream flow and reservoir levels at:
Lewis River at Woodland       Speelyai Creek      Muddy Creek
Lewis River at Ariel      Lewis River Reservoir Levels

We are very pleased to offer you this fishing report site. Please only post reports or information that is of interest to all. Many people want a fast report and don't have time to read a lot of other stuff. Inappropriate posts will be deleted. Thanks, Noel Johnson.

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