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Salmon season closes Aug. 20 in Marine Area 11 Action: Closes salmon fishing in Marine Area 11 (Tacoma-Vashon Island), excluding the fishing piers. Effective Date: Effective 12:01 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 20, through 11:59 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016. Species affected: Salmon. Location: Marine Area 11 (Tacoma-Vashon Island). Reason for action: Preliminary estimates indicate that anglers will exceed the preseason guideline for encounters – retaining or releasing fish – with legal-sized chinook in Marine Area 11. The chinook fishery is being closed to control impacts on stocks of concern and ensure compliance with conservation objectives. Other information: Anglers can fish for chinook in other Puget Sound marine areas, including area 7 (San Juan Islands), south of Ayock Point in area 12 (Hood Canal), area 13 (South Puget Sound), Sinclair Inlet, and Tulalip Terminal Area. Area 11 fishing piers that remain open through Aug. 31 include Dash Point Dock, Les Davis Pier, Des Moines Pier, Redondo Pier, and Point Defiance Boathouse Dock. Marine Area 11 is scheduled to reopen in February for chinook. For specific regulations, anglers should consult the 2016-17 Washington Sports Fishing Rules pamphlet available online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/. Information contact: Ryan Lothrop, (360) 902-2808 - 9:31 a.m. 8/18/2016
Salmon season closes Aug. 20 in
Marine Area 11

Action: Closes salmon fishing in
Marine Area 11 (Tacoma-Vashon
Island), excluding the fishing piers.

Effective Date: Effective 12:01 a.m.
Saturday, Aug. 20, through 11:59 p.m.
Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016.

Species affected: Salmon.

Location: Marine Area 11 (Tacoma-
Vashon Island).

Reason for action: Preliminary
estimates indicate that anglers will
exceed the preseason guideline for
encounters – retaining or releasing
fish – with legal-sized chinook in
Marine Area 11. The chinook fishery
is being closed to control impacts on
stocks of concern and ensure
compliance with conservation
objectives.

Other information: Anglers can fish
for chinook in other Puget Sound
marine areas, including area 7 (San
Juan Islands), south of Ayock Point
in area 12 (Hood Canal), area 13
(South Puget Sound), Sinclair Inlet,
and Tulalip Terminal Area.

Area 11 fishing piers that remain
open through Aug. 31 include Dash
Point Dock, Les Davis Pier, Des
Moines Pier, Redondo Pier, and Point
Defiance Boathouse Dock. Marine Area
11 is scheduled to reopen in February
for chinook.

For specific regulations, anglers
should consult the 2016-17 Washington
Sports Fishing Rules pamphlet
available online at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulation
s/.

Information contact: Ryan Lothrop,
(360) 902-2808


Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Elwha, Nisqually rivers designated gene banks to protect wild steelhead OLYMPIA –The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) today designated the Nisqually and Elwha rivers as wild steelhead gene banks to help conserve wild steelhead populations. Under that designation, both rivers will be off-limits to releases of steelhead raised in state hatcheries, which can pose risks to native fish through interbreeding and competition for spawning areas. Fishing will be allowed if wild steelhead runs to those rivers are strong enough to allow it. Both rivers meet the criteria for gene banks established in the Statewide Steelhead Management Plan to help reverse the long-term decline of wild steelhead returning to rivers in Washington state, said Jim Scott, a special assistant to the WDFW director. "The Nisqually and Elwha rivers can play a major role in the recovery of wild steelhead populations in the Puget Sound area," Scott said. "This new designation, along with other conservation efforts already underway, will help us reach that goal." WDFW presented both rivers as possible options for wild steelhead gene banks during a series of public meetings and an online comment period during the summer of 2015. Other options included the Skagit and Sauk rivers, but WDFW delayed designating a wild steelhead gene bank in northern Puget Sound pending further review. The department expects to make that decision after consultation with a new advisory group and area treaty tribes, Scott said. Under a 2014 court settlement, WDFW agreed to stop releasing early winter hatchery steelhead in the Skagit River through 2025. Scott noted, however, that WDFW is considering a proposal to release steelhead raised from local stock at the department's Marblemount Hatchery. "Most public comments received by the department support the designation of the entire Skagit River as a gene bank, but some are concerned about the potential impact on fisheries and the local economy," Scott said. "We are committed to establishing at least one wild steelhead gene bank in North Cascades region, but plan to convene an advisory group to discuss the options in greater detail before proceeding." None of the sites WDFW proposed as wild steelhead gene banks in the Puget Sound area drew more public support than the Elwha River on the north side of the Olympic Peninsula. While still recovering from the removal of two large hydroelectric dams in 2012, the river now has more than 40 miles of additional spawning and rearing habitat, much of it inside Olympic National Park. In addition, studies have found that the river's native winter steelhead population remains genetically distinct, despite releases of early winter hatchery fish conducted until 2011. An interim hatchery program currently operated by the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe to restore the river's steelhead population is scheduled to end once river conditions improve and restoration objectives for wild steelhead are achieved. The - 10:02 a.m. 8/15/2016
Elwha, Nisqually rivers designated
gene banks to protect wild steelhead

OLYMPIA –The Washington Department of
Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) today
designated the Nisqually and Elwha
rivers as wild steelhead gene banks
to help conserve wild steelhead
populations.

Under that designation, both rivers
will be off-limits to releases of
steelhead raised in state hatcheries,
which can pose risks to native fish
through interbreeding and competition
for spawning areas. Fishing will be
allowed if wild steelhead runs to
those rivers are strong enough to
allow it.

Both rivers meet the criteria for
gene banks established in the
Statewide Steelhead Management Plan
to help reverse the long-term decline
of wild steelhead returning to rivers
in Washington state, said Jim Scott,
a special assistant to the WDFW
director.

"The Nisqually and Elwha rivers can
play a major role in the recovery of
wild steelhead populations in the
Puget Sound area," Scott said. "This
new designation, along with other
conservation efforts already
underway, will help us reach that
goal."

WDFW presented both rivers as
possible options for wild steelhead
gene banks during a series of public
meetings and an online comment period
during the summer of 2015.

Other options included the Skagit and
Sauk rivers, but WDFW delayed
designating a wild steelhead gene
bank in northern Puget Sound pending
further review. The department
expects to make that decision after
consultation with a new advisory
group and area treaty tribes, Scott
said.

Under a 2014 court settlement, WDFW
agreed to stop releasing early winter
hatchery steelhead in the Skagit
River through 2025. Scott noted,
however, that WDFW is considering a
proposal to release steelhead raised
from local stock at the department's
Marblemount Hatchery.

"Most public comments received by the
department support the designation of
the entire Skagit River as a gene
bank, but some are concerned about
the potential impact on fisheries and
the local economy," Scott said. "We
are committed to establishing at
least one wild steelhead gene bank in
North Cascades region, but plan to
convene an advisory group to discuss
the options in greater detail before
proceeding."

None of the sites WDFW proposed as
wild steelhead gene banks in the
Puget Sound area drew more public
support than the Elwha River on the
north side of the Olympic Peninsula.
While still recovering from the
removal of two large hydroelectric
dams in 2012, the river now has more
than 40 miles of additional spawning
and rearing habitat, much of it
inside Olympic National Park.

In addition, studies have found that
the river's native winter steelhead
population remains genetically
distinct, despite releases of early
winter hatchery fish conducted until
2011. An interim hatchery program
currently operated by the Lower Elwha
Klallam Tribe to restore the river's
steelhead population is scheduled to
end once river conditions improve and
restoration objectives for wild
steelhead are achieved.

The

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

WDFW invites applications to new Puget Sound steelhead advisory group OLYMPIA – The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is seeking applications through August 31 for membership on a new ad hoc advisory group that will assist in developing management options for Puget Sound steelhead. The new advisory group will meet twice monthly through December to develop recommendations that support conservation objectives and improve sustainable fishing opportunities for steelhead in tributaries to Puget Sound. The group's primary task will be to develop fishery and hatchery management strategies tailored to specific watersheds throughout Puget Sound, said Jim Scott, special assistant to the WDFW director. As part of that effort, the group will also be asked to help identify a new wild steelhead gene bank in north Puget Sound. "We are looking for applicants who are well-acquainted with the fisheries, hatchery programs and ecological issues of watersheds throughout the Puget Sound area," Scott said. "We plan to draw on their knowledge as the department works with federal fishery managers on steelhead recovery planning efforts." WDFW plans to make a final decision on river-specific management strategies and a gene bank in north Puget Sound later this year after receiving input from the advisory group and completing discussions with tribal fishery managers. Applications for membership in the Puget Sound Steelhead Advisory Group must be submitted in writing with the following information: Applicant's name, address, telephone number and email address. Relevant experience and reasons for wanting to serve as a member of the advisory group. Applicant's effectiveness in communication. Name and contact information for any individual or organization submitting a nomination. Applications must be received by Sept. 1. They may be submitted to Cathy Davidson by mail: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 600 Capitol Way N., Olympia, WA, 98501; or email at Cathy.Davidson@dfw.wa.gov. For more information, contact Jim Scott at (360) 902-2736. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list. Visit the WDFW News Release Archive at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/ To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html - 10:01 a.m. 8/15/2016
WDFW invites applications to new
Puget Sound steelhead advisory group

OLYMPIA – The Washington Department
of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is
seeking applications through August
31 for membership on a new ad hoc
advisory group that will assist in
developing management options for
Puget Sound steelhead.

The new advisory group will meet
twice monthly through December to
develop recommendations that support
conservation objectives and improve
sustainable fishing opportunities for
steelhead in tributaries to Puget
Sound.

The group's primary task will be to
develop fishery and hatchery
management strategies tailored to
specific watersheds throughout Puget
Sound, said Jim Scott, special
assistant to the WDFW director. As
part of that effort, the group will
also be asked to help identify a new
wild steelhead gene bank in north
Puget Sound.

"We are looking for applicants who
are well-acquainted with the
fisheries, hatchery programs and
ecological issues of watersheds
throughout the Puget Sound area,"
Scott said. "We plan to draw on their
knowledge as the department works
with federal fishery managers on
steelhead recovery planning efforts."

WDFW plans to make a final decision
on river-specific management
strategies and a gene bank in north
Puget Sound later this year after
receiving input from the advisory
group and completing discussions with
tribal fishery managers.

Applications for membership in the
Puget Sound Steelhead Advisory Group
must be submitted in writing with the
following information:

Applicant's name, address, telephone
number and email address.
Relevant experience and reasons for
wanting to serve as a member of the
advisory group.
Applicant's effectiveness in
communication.
Name and contact information for any
individual or organization submitting
a nomination.
Applications must be received by
Sept. 1. They may be submitted to
Cathy Davidson by mail: Washington
Department of Fish and Wildlife, 600
Capitol Way N., Olympia, WA, 98501;
or email at
Cathy.Davidson@dfw.wa.gov. For more
information, contact Jim Scott at
(360) 902-2736.

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to the
WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the WDFW News Release Archive
at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing
list:
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.
html

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

WDFW invites applications to new Puget Sound steelhead advisory group OLYMPIA – The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is seeking applications through August 31 for membership on a new ad hoc advisory group that will assist in developing management options for Puget Sound steelhead. The new advisory group will meet twice monthly through December to develop recommendations that support conservation objectives and improve sustainable fishing opportunities for steelhead in tributaries to Puget Sound. The group's primary task will be to develop fishery and hatchery management strategies tailored to specific watersheds throughout Puget Sound, said Jim Scott, special assistant to the WDFW director. As part of that effort, the group will also be asked to help identify a new wild steelhead gene bank in north Puget Sound. "We are looking for applicants who are well-acquainted with the fisheries, hatchery programs and ecological issues of watersheds throughout the Puget Sound area," Scott said. "We plan to draw on their knowledge as the department works with federal fishery managers on steelhead recovery planning efforts." WDFW plans to make a final decision on river-specific management strategies and a gene bank in north Puget Sound later this year after receiving input from the advisory group and completing discussions with tribal fishery managers. Applications for membership in the Puget Sound Steelhead Advisory Group must be submitted in writing with the following information: Applicant's name, address, telephone number and email address. Relevant experience and reasons for wanting to serve as a member of the advisory group. Applicant's effectiveness in communication. Name and contact information for any individual or organization submitting a nomination. Applications must be received by Sept. 1. They may be submitted to Cathy Davidson by mail: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 600 Capitol Way N., Olympia, WA, 98501; or email at Cathy.Davidson@dfw.wa.gov. For more information, contact Jim Scott at (360) 902-2736. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list. Visit the WDFW News Release Archive at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/ To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html - 9:58 a.m. 8/15/2016
WDFW invites applications to new
Puget Sound steelhead advisory group

OLYMPIA – The Washington Department
of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is
seeking applications through August
31 for membership on a new ad hoc
advisory group that will assist in
developing management options for
Puget Sound steelhead.

The new advisory group will meet
twice monthly through December to
develop recommendations that support
conservation objectives and improve
sustainable fishing opportunities for
steelhead in tributaries to Puget
Sound.

The group's primary task will be to
develop fishery and hatchery
management strategies tailored to
specific watersheds throughout Puget
Sound, said Jim Scott, special
assistant to the WDFW director. As
part of that effort, the group will
also be asked to help identify a new
wild steelhead gene bank in north
Puget Sound.

"We are looking for applicants who
are well-acquainted with the
fisheries, hatchery programs and
ecological issues of watersheds
throughout the Puget Sound area,"
Scott said. "We plan to draw on their
knowledge as the department works
with federal fishery managers on
steelhead recovery planning efforts."

WDFW plans to make a final decision
on river-specific management
strategies and a gene bank in north
Puget Sound later this year after
receiving input from the advisory
group and completing discussions with
tribal fishery managers.

Applications for membership in the
Puget Sound Steelhead Advisory Group
must be submitted in writing with the
following information:

Applicant's name, address, telephone
number and email address.
Relevant experience and reasons for
wanting to serve as a member of the
advisory group.
Applicant's effectiveness in
communication.
Name and contact information for any
individual or organization submitting
a nomination.
Applications must be received by
Sept. 1. They may be submitted to
Cathy Davidson by mail: Washington
Department of Fish and Wildlife, 600
Capitol Way N., Olympia, WA, 98501;
or email at
Cathy.Davidson@dfw.wa.gov. For more
information, contact Jim Scott at
(360) 902-2736.

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to the
WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the WDFW News Release Archive
at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing
list:
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.
html

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Elwha, Nisqually rivers designated gene banks to protect wild steelhead OLYMPIA –The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) today designated the Nisqually and Elwha rivers as wild steelhead gene banks to help conserve wild steelhead populations. Under that designation, both rivers will be off-limits to releases of steelhead raised in state hatcheries, which can pose risks to native fish through interbreeding and competition for spawning areas. Fishing will be allowed if wild steelhead runs to those rivers are strong enough to allow it. Both rivers meet the criteria for gene banks established in the Statewide Steelhead Management Plan to help reverse the long-term decline of wild steelhead returning to rivers in Washington state, said Jim Scott, a special assistant to the WDFW director. "The Nisqually and Elwha rivers can play a major role in the recovery of wild steelhead populations in the Puget Sound area," Scott said. "This new designation, along with other conservation efforts already underway, will help us reach that goal." WDFW presented both rivers as possible options for wild steelhead gene banks during a series of public meetings and an online comment period during the summer of 2015. Other options included the Skagit and Sauk rivers, but WDFW delayed designating a wild steelhead gene bank in northern Puget Sound pending further review. The department expects to make that decision after consultation with a new advisory group and area treaty tribes, Scott said. Under a 2014 court settlement, WDFW agreed to stop releasing early winter hatchery steelhead in the Skagit River through 2025. Scott noted, however, that WDFW is considering a proposal to release steelhead raised from local stock at the department's Marblemount Hatchery. "Most public comments received by the department support the designation of the entire Skagit River as a gene bank, but some are concerned about the potential impact on fisheries and the local economy," Scott said. "We are committed to establishing at least one wild steelhead gene bank in North Cascades region, but plan to convene an advisory group to discuss the options in greater detail before proceeding." None of the sites WDFW proposed as wild steelhead gene banks in the Puget Sound area drew more public support than the Elwha River on the north side of the Olympic Peninsula. While still recovering from the removal of two large hydroelectric dams in 2012, the river now has more than 40 miles of additional spawning and rearing habitat, much of it inside Olympic National Park. In addition, studies have found that the river's native winter steelhead population remains genetically distinct, despite releases of early winter hatchery fish conducted until 2011. An interim hatchery program currently operated by the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe to restore the river's steelhead population is scheduled to end once river conditions improve and restoration objectives for wild steelhead are achieved. The Nisqually River, which flows into southern Puget Sound, was also a strong candidate for a wild steelhead gene bank – in part because of the ongoing efforts by the Nisqually River Council to protect and restore fish habitat on the river, Scott said. No hatchery-origin winter steelhead have been released into the watershed since 1982, and the number of wild steelhead spawning in the river increased to more than 1,000 fish in 2015 and more than 2,000 in 2016. With the addition of the Nisqually and Elwha rivers, WDFW has now designated 14 wild steelhead gene banks in watersheds around the state. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list. Visit the WDFW News Release Archive at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/ To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html - 9:56 a.m. 8/15/2016
Elwha, Nisqually rivers designated
gene banks to protect wild steelhead

OLYMPIA –The Washington Department of
Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) today
designated the Nisqually and Elwha
rivers as wild steelhead gene banks
to help conserve wild steelhead
populations.

Under that designation, both rivers
will be off-limits to releases of
steelhead raised in state hatcheries,
which can pose risks to native fish
through interbreeding and competition
for spawning areas. Fishing will be
allowed if wild steelhead runs to
those rivers are strong enough to
allow it.

Both rivers meet the criteria for
gene banks established in the
Statewide Steelhead Management Plan
to help reverse the long-term decline
of wild steelhead returning to rivers
in Washington state, said Jim Scott,
a special assistant to the WDFW
director.

"The Nisqually and Elwha rivers can
play a major role in the recovery of
wild steelhead populations in the
Puget Sound area," Scott said. "This
new designation, along with other
conservation efforts already
underway, will help us reach that
goal."

WDFW presented both rivers as
possible options for wild steelhead
gene banks during a series of public
meetings and an online comment period
during the summer of 2015.

Other options included the Skagit and
Sauk rivers, but WDFW delayed
designating a wild steelhead gene
bank in northern Puget Sound pending
further review. The department
expects to make that decision after
consultation with a new advisory
group and area treaty tribes, Scott
said.

Under a 2014 court settlement, WDFW
agreed to stop releasing early winter
hatchery steelhead in the Skagit
River through 2025. Scott noted,
however, that WDFW is considering a
proposal to release steelhead raised
from local stock at the department's
Marblemount Hatchery.

"Most public comments received by the
department support the designation of
the entire Skagit River as a gene
bank, but some are concerned about
the potential impact on fisheries and
the local economy," Scott said. "We
are committed to establishing at
least one wild steelhead gene bank in
North Cascades region, but plan to
convene an advisory group to discuss
the options in greater detail before
proceeding."

None of the sites WDFW proposed as
wild steelhead gene banks in the
Puget Sound area drew more public
support than the Elwha River on the
north side of the Olympic Peninsula.
While still recovering from the
removal of two large hydroelectric
dams in 2012, the river now has more
than 40 miles of additional spawning
and rearing habitat, much of it
inside Olympic National Park.

In addition, studies have found that
the river's native winter steelhead
population remains genetically
distinct, despite releases of early
winter hatchery fish conducted until
2011. An interim hatchery program
currently operated by the Lower Elwha
Klallam Tribe to restore the river's
steelhead population is scheduled to
end once river conditions improve and
restoration objectives for wild
steelhead are achieved.

The Nisqually River, which flows into
southern Puget Sound, was also a
strong candidate for a wild steelhead
gene bank – in part because of the
ongoing efforts by the Nisqually
River Council to protect and restore
fish habitat on the river, Scott
said. No hatchery-origin winter
steelhead have been released into the
watershed since 1982, and the number
of wild steelhead spawning in the
river increased to more than 1,000
fish in 2015 and more than 2,000 in
2016.

With the addition of the Nisqually
and Elwha rivers, WDFW has now
designated 14 wild steelhead gene
banks in watersheds around the state.


Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to the
WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the WDFW News Release Archive
at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing
list:
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.
html

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Bass caught in Snohomish County shatters 39-year-old state record OLYMPIA – A Snohomish County angler has set a new state record for the biggest largemouth bass caught in state waters, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) confirmed today. Bill Evans of Bothell caught the monster bass Aug. 8 in Lake Bosworth in Snohomish County while fishing with a Strike King 5-inch Shim-E-Stick, wacky-rigged on a 1/0 hook. It weighed 12.53 pounds and measured 23.0 inches long with a girth of 22.5 inches. The previous record was set by Carl Pruitt in 1977 at Banks Lake with a fish weighing 11.57 pounds, nearly one pound less. “As soon as I set the hook, I knew it had to be a big one because the bottom pulled hard and it just wouldn’t quit,” Evans said, “When she finally tried to jump, she could only get her head out of the water.” Evans realized how big the fish really was when he started lifting it into the boat. “She just kept getting heavier and heavier,” he said, “I put her in the livewell, but she didn’t even fit – her tail stuck out”. Evans is a seasoned bass angler with nearly 40 years of experience. He moved to Washington a few years ago, and just started bass fishing in the state this summer. Evans has fished several lakes in the Bothell area, but Monday was his first time fishing at Lake Bosworth. He found the small lake on WDFW’s Fish Washington feature available on the department’s website (http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/washington). The map-based webpage provides access to fishing advice and videos, as well as information by county and fish species location for lowland lakes, high lakes and marine areas. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. - 8:24 a.m. 8/13/2016
Bass caught in Snohomish County
shatters 39-year-old state record

OLYMPIA – A Snohomish County angler
has set a new state record for the
biggest largemouth bass caught in
state waters, the Washington
Department of Fish and Wildlife
(WDFW) confirmed today.

Bill Evans of Bothell caught the
monster bass Aug. 8 in Lake Bosworth
in Snohomish County while fishing
with a Strike King 5-inch Shim-E-
Stick, wacky-rigged on a 1/0 hook. It
weighed 12.53 pounds and measured
23.0 inches long with a girth of 22.5
inches.

The previous record was set by Carl
Pruitt in 1977 at Banks Lake with a
fish weighing 11.57 pounds, nearly
one pound less.

“As soon as I set the hook, I knew it
had to be a big one because the
bottom pulled hard and it just
wouldn’t quit,” Evans said, “When she
finally tried to jump, she could only
get her head out of the water.”

Evans realized how big the fish
really was when he started lifting it
into the boat. “She just kept getting
heavier and heavier,” he said, “I put
her in the livewell, but she didn’t
even fit – her tail stuck out”.

Evans is a seasoned bass angler with
nearly 40 years of experience. He
moved to Washington a few years ago,
and just started bass fishing in the
state this summer. Evans has fished
several lakes in the Bothell area,
but Monday was his first time fishing
at Lake Bosworth.

He found the small lake on WDFW’s
Fish Washington feature available on
the department’s website
(http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/washingto
n). The map-based webpage provides
access to fishing advice and videos,
as well as information by county and
fish species location for lowland
lakes, high lakes and marine areas.

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Catch limit in Marine Area 10 increases to 2 chinook per day Action: Increases the daily limit for hatchery chinook to two fish in Marine Area 10, excluding Sinclair Inlet and fishing piers. Effective date: 12:01 a.m. Friday, Aug. 12, through 11:59 p.m. Monday, Aug. 15, 2016. Species affected: Chinook salmon. Location: Marine Area 10 (Seattle/Bremerton Area). Reason for action: Preliminary estimates indicate that anglers had caught 709 fish – or 50 percent – of the chinook quota of 1,395 fish for Marine Area 10. WDFW anticipates that sufficient quota remains to allow the fishery to run through Aug. 15 as scheduled and to allow for an increase in the daily limit to two hatchery chinook. The changes to the chinook fishery are in compliance with conservation objectives and agreed-to management plans. Other information: The catch estimates and quotas for Marine Area 10 can be found at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/reports_plants.html. Marine Area 10 is scheduled to close Aug. 16 and will reopen Nov. 1 for chinook. Sinclair Inlet will remain open through Sept. 30. Fishing piers located in Area 10 (Elliott Bay Fishing Pier at Terminal 86 and Seacrest Pier) are open through Aug. 31 and will reopen Nov. 1. Fishing piers located in Sinclair Inlet (Waterman Pier, Bremerton Boardwalk and Illahee State Park) are open year-round. For specific regulations, anglers should consult the 2016-17 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet available online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/. Information contact: Ryan Lothrop, (360) 902-2808 Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. - 9:18 a.m. 8/12/2016
Catch limit in Marine Area 10
increases to 2 chinook per day

Action: Increases the daily limit for
hatchery chinook to two fish in
Marine Area 10, excluding Sinclair
Inlet and fishing piers.

Effective date: 12:01 a.m. Friday,
Aug. 12, through 11:59 p.m. Monday,
Aug. 15, 2016.

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Location: Marine Area 10
(Seattle/Bremerton Area).

Reason for action: Preliminary
estimates indicate that anglers had
caught 709 fish – or 50 percent – of
the chinook quota of 1,395 fish for
Marine Area 10. WDFW anticipates that
sufficient quota remains to allow the
fishery to run through Aug. 15 as
scheduled and to allow for an
increase in the daily limit to two
hatchery chinook. The changes to the
chinook fishery are in compliance
with conservation objectives and
agreed-to management plans.

Other information: The catch
estimates and quotas for Marine Area
10 can be found at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/reports_pl
ants.html.

Marine Area 10 is scheduled to close
Aug. 16 and will reopen Nov. 1 for
chinook. Sinclair Inlet will remain
open through Sept. 30. Fishing piers
located in Area 10 (Elliott Bay
Fishing Pier at Terminal 86 and
Seacrest Pier) are open through Aug.
31 and will reopen Nov. 1. Fishing
piers located in Sinclair Inlet
(Waterman Pier, Bremerton Boardwalk
and Illahee State Park) are open
year-round.

For specific regulations, anglers
should consult the 2016-17 Washington
Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet
available online at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulation
s/.

Information contact: Ryan Lothrop,
(360) 902-2808

Fishers must have a current
Washington fishing license,
appropriate to the fishery. Check the
WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules
pamphlet for details on fishing
seasons and regulations. Fishing
rules are subject to change. Check
the WDFW Fishing hotline for the
latest rule information at (360) 902-
2500, press 2 for recreational rules.
For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline
call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-
866-880-5431.
Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Lake Washington and Lake Sammamish will re-open to fishing for trout and other game fish Action: Opens Lake Washington, the Lake Washington Ship Canal, and Lake Sammamish to fishing for trout and other game fish. Effective dates: Sept. 1, 2016 through Oct. 31, 2016. Species affected: Trout and other game fish. Locations: (1) Lake Washington (King County), including that portion of Sammamish River from 68th Ave. NE Bridge downstream. (2) Lake Washington Ship Canal (King County), waters east of a north-south line 400 feet west of the Chittenden (Ballard) Locks to the Montlake Bridge, including Lake Union, Portage Bay, and Salmon Bay. (3) Lake Sammamish (King County): Release Kokanee. Other information: Statewide minimum size and daily limits are in effect. Reasons for action: These areas had been closed under a co-manager agreement to protect coho salmon. The co-managers have since agreed that recreational fisheries for trout and other game fish in Lakes Washington and Sammamish will not significantly affect coho salmon due to low encounter rates with salmon during those fisheries. Information Contact: Mill Creek Regional Office, (425) 775-1311 - 9:17 a.m. 8/12/2016
Lake Washington and Lake Sammamish
will re-open to fishing for trout and
other game fish

Action: Opens Lake Washington, the
Lake Washington Ship Canal, and Lake
Sammamish to fishing for trout and
other game fish.

Effective dates: Sept. 1, 2016
through Oct. 31, 2016.

Species affected: Trout and other
game fish.

Locations:
(1) Lake Washington (King County),
including that portion of Sammamish
River from 68th Ave. NE Bridge
downstream.
(2) Lake Washington Ship Canal (King
County), waters east of a north-south
line 400 feet west of the Chittenden
(Ballard) Locks to the Montlake
Bridge, including Lake Union, Portage
Bay, and Salmon Bay.
(3) Lake Sammamish (King County):
Release Kokanee.

Other information: Statewide minimum
size and daily limits are in effect.

Reasons for action: These areas had
been closed under a co-manager
agreement to protect coho salmon. The
co-managers have since agreed that
recreational fisheries for trout and
other game fish in Lakes Washington
and Sammamish will not significantly
affect coho salmon due to low
encounter rates with salmon during
those fisheries.

Information Contact: Mill Creek
Regional Office, (425) 775-1311


Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Lost Fish!? - 10:10 p.m. 8/10/2016
Hey Brad, it is part of the game, they just
come off sometimes. Bad hook set, horsing
them to much, bad knot, etc, etc , etc.... A lot
of different factors can attribute to a lost
fish, that's part of what keeps us coming
back for more!!! Don't worry about it!

On the bright side, it seems there are a lot of
fish in the river right now, seems everyone
knows it too! A lot of pressure out there and
a lot off hook ups too. Be respectful of your
neighbors and remember if you are fishing
in a group to cast in order. The person down
river of you casts first, then you, and then
the person up river of you. Share the river
and everyone has fun! Unless of course they
are portlanders with their oh so many
fishing buddies, screw 'em then!!! Just
kidding!!! LMAO!!!

A lot of trash being left on the river too!
Come on guys, pack it in, pack it out plus
two items!!! The lewis is a beautiful river,
lets keep it that way!

Sticky

Marine Area 6 closing to spot shrimp fishing Action: Marine Area 6 (excluding the Discovery Bay Shrimp District) is closing to recreational spot shrimp fishing. Effective date: Sunday, Aug.14, 2016, at 9 p.m. Species affected: Spot shrimp. Location: Marine Area 6 (excluding the Discovery Bay Shrimp District), which is located in the eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca. Reason for action: The recreational spot shrimp quota in this area will be reached. Other information: Marine Area 6 (excluding the Discovery Bay Shrimp District) will remain open to coonstripe and pink shrimp fishing with a 200 foot maximum fishing depth restriction. It is unlawful to possess spot shrimp, and all spot shrimp must be returned to the water immediately. Contact: Mark O'Toole, La Conner, (360) 466-4345 ext. 241, or Don Velasquez, Mill Creek, (425) 775-1311 ext. 112. Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. - 9:39 a.m. 8/10/2016
Marine Area 6 closing to spot shrimp
fishing

Action: Marine Area 6 (excluding the
Discovery Bay Shrimp District) is
closing to recreational spot shrimp
fishing.

Effective date: Sunday, Aug.14, 2016,
at 9 p.m.

Species affected: Spot shrimp.

Location: Marine Area 6 (excluding
the Discovery Bay Shrimp District),
which is located in the eastern
Strait of Juan de Fuca.

Reason for action: The recreational
spot shrimp quota in this area will
be reached.

Other information: Marine Area 6
(excluding the Discovery Bay Shrimp
District) will remain open to
coonstripe and pink shrimp fishing
with a 200 foot maximum fishing depth
restriction. It is unlawful to
possess spot shrimp, and all spot
shrimp must be returned to the water
immediately.

Contact: Mark O'Toole, La Conner,
(360) 466-4345 ext. 241, or Don
Velasquez, Mill Creek, (425) 775-1311
ext. 112.

Fishers must have a current
Washington fishing license,
appropriate to the fishery. Check the
WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules
pamphlet for details on fishing
seasons and regulations. Fishing
rules are subject to change. Check
the WDFW Fishing hotline for the
latest rule information at (360) 902-
2500, press 2 for recreational rules.
For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline
call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-
866-880-5431.
Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

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For fishing pictures go to LewisRiver.com monthy fishing pictures.
For more information go to Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Call 1.800.547.1501 for updated reservoir levels and estimated river flow below Merwin.
For N. F . Lewis River flow go to River Flows At Ariel.
For East Fork Lewis River flow go to East Fork Lewis River Near Heisson, Wa.

Stream flow and reservoir levels at:
Lewis River at Woodland       Speelyai Creek      Muddy Creek
Lewis River at Ariel      Lewis River Reservoir Levels

We are very pleased to offer you this fishing report site. Please only post reports or information that is of interest to all. Many people want a fast report and don't have time to read a lot of other stuff. Inappropriate posts will be deleted. Thanks, Noel Johnson.

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