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Halibut fishing will re-open June 23 in marine areas 3 and 4 Action: Recreational halibut fishing in Marine Area 3 (La Push) and Marine Area 4 (Neah Bay) will re-open for one additional fishing day on Thursday, June 23, 2016. Catch through Saturday (June 11) was 95,146 pounds, leaving 12,884 pounds of quota remaining. That is sufficient for another weekday of fishing, but not another weekend day of fishing. Effective date: June 23, 2016. Species affected: Pacific halibut. Location: Marine areas 3 and 4. Reason for action: There is sufficient quota remaining in marine areas 3 and 4 to open the recreational halibut fishery for another day. This rule conforms to federal action taken by the National Marine Fisheries Service and the International Pacific Halibut Commission. Information contact: Heather Reed, (360) 249-4628 ext. 202. Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list. Visit the Emergency Fishing Rule Website at: https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/ To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html - 7:30 p.m. 6/17/2016
Halibut fishing will re-open June 23
in marine areas 3 and 4

Action: Recreational halibut fishing
in Marine Area 3 (La Push) and Marine
Area 4 (Neah Bay) will re-open for
one additional fishing day on
Thursday, June 23, 2016. Catch
through Saturday (June 11) was 95,146
pounds, leaving 12,884 pounds of
quota remaining. That is sufficient
for another weekday of fishing, but
not another weekend day of fishing.

Effective date: June 23, 2016.

Species affected: Pacific halibut.

Location: Marine areas 3 and 4.

Reason for action: There is
sufficient quota remaining in marine
areas 3 and 4 to open the
recreational halibut fishery for
another day. This rule conforms to
federal action taken by the National
Marine Fisheries Service and the
International Pacific Halibut
Commission.

Information contact: Heather Reed,
(360) 249-4628 ext. 202.

Fishers must have a current
Washington fishing license,
appropriate to the fishery. Check the
WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules
pamphlet for details on fishing
seasons and regulations. Fishing
rules are subject to change. Check
the WDFW Fishing hotline for the
latest rule information at (360) 902-
2500, press 2 for recreational rules.
For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline
call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-
866-880-5431.
Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to the
WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the Emergency Fishing Rule
Website at:
https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/ef
ishrules/
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing
list:
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.
html

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Nfl - 4:53 p.m. 6/15/2016
Anyone had any luck on lewis?

Jeff - Vancouver wa

Members of national, state guard can qualify for free hunting licenses OLYMPIA Members of the Washington National Guard and the Washington State Guard who meet state residency and other requirements can qualify for free hunting licenses under a new law that took effect this week. A free license package to hunt big game, small game, and migratory waterfowl is now available to active, full-time members of the National and State Guard, and to those who participate in drill training with these military units on a part-time basis. Sponsored by Rep. Brian Blake of Aberdeen, the special licensing offer won unanimous approval by state Legislature and was signed into law by Gov. Inslee earlier this year. "I think the new license option is a great way to thank Washington Guard members for their service and encourage them to stay in and serve," said Maj. Steve Beecroft, one of the first National Guard members to apply this week at the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) office in Olympia. Those interested in receiving the free licensing package must submit a printed application to WDFW along with: Verification of their military service. A copy of their Washington State driver's license to verify state residency. A copy of their hunter education certificate, unless they were born before Jan. 1, 1972, or have previously purchased a Washington hunting license. WDFW also accepts hunter education certifications from other states. Application forms and additional information about the free licensing option are available on WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/licensing/national_guard/ Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. - 5:05 p.m. 6/10/2016
Members of national, state guard can
qualify for free hunting licenses

OLYMPIA Members of the Washington
National Guard and the Washington
State Guard who meet state residency
and other requirements can qualify
for free hunting licenses under a new
law that took effect this week.

A free license package to hunt big
game, small game, and migratory
waterfowl is now available to active,
full-time members of the National and
State Guard, and to those who
participate in drill training with
these military units on a part-time
basis.

Sponsored by Rep. Brian Blake of
Aberdeen, the special licensing offer
won unanimous approval by state
Legislature and was signed into law
by Gov. Inslee earlier this year.

"I think the new license option is a
great way to thank Washington Guard
members for their service and
encourage them to stay in and serve,"
said Maj. Steve Beecroft, one of the
first National Guard members to apply
this week at the Washington
Department of Fish and Wildlife
(WDFW) office in Olympia.

Those interested in receiving the
free licensing package must submit a
printed application to WDFW along
with:

Verification of their military
service.
A copy of their Washington State
driver's license to verify state
residency.
A copy of their hunter education
certificate, unless they were born
before Jan. 1, 1972, or have
previously purchased a Washington
hunting license. WDFW also accepts
hunter education certifications from
other states.
Application forms and additional
information about the free licensing
option are available on WDFW's
website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/licensing/national
_guard/

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

CROSSING PATHS WITH WASHINGTON'S WILDLIFE June 2016 Puget Sound's Great blue herons provide summertime watching By Jamie Bails, WDFW habitat biologist Even amidst fully-leafed-out trees at this time of year, it's hard to miss a great blue heron (Ardea herodias). Four feet tall with a six-foot span of blue-feathered wings, this big bird is mostly beak, neck and legs. It's commonly found in both rural and urban areas of every Washington county and can be even more noticeable in the spring and summer because it nests communally, in large groups called heron rookeries or colonies. Although widely recognized, much is still unknown about foraging, seasonal dispersal, habitat associations and winter distribution of the great blue heron. Many eastern Washington herons migrate south in the fall, but others, especially on the west side of the state, are year-round residents. The non-migratory Puget Sound population is classified as a sub-species (Ardea herodias fannini) found only in the Salish Sea, a broad area that stretches from Prince William Sound to south Puget Sound. What we DO know is that these herons are an important indicator of the health of Puget Sound. According to "Great Blue Herons of Puget Sound," a technical report by Ann Eissinger published by the Puget Sound Nearshore Partnership, 49 percent of this population is concentrated in four mega-colonies of 200-600 heron pairs. The remaining 51 percent is in small to medium colonies of less than 200 pairs, scattered along the Puget Sound shore from Bellingham to Olympia. Many of the largest nest sites are in northern Puget Sound near eelgrass beds on marine shorelines, like the March Point colony in Padilla Bay, where several dozen herons are frequently seen wading to feed on herring, shrimp, crabs, sculpins, starry flounder and other aquatic life. In south Puget Sound, where eelgrass is not abundant, smaller colonies are distributed by tree availability, access to marsh foraging areas and prey abundance. These smaller southern colonies usually breed earlier than those of the north and Strait of Georgia. Based on Eissinger's observations over 25-plus years, some mega-colonies appear to fragment, with herons relocating to new and existing nesting sites, usually closer to productive marine feeding areas. For example, a Point Roberts colony of nearly 400 nesting pairs began to fragment in 2002-2003, with about 350 pairs moving about two miles north to the Tsawassen bluff, directly above their primary feeding grounds at Roberts Bank. Another case was the Birch Bay colony of about 275 nesting pairs, which fragmented and relocated between 2006 and 2008 to a new site at Drayton Harbor with about 100 nests, and to the Lummi Bay colony, which grew by 50-100 nests. Most great blue herons begin the reproductive cycle in early February, gathering at these traditional communal nest sites. These sites are usually in tall deciduous trees such as alder, cottonwood and big leaf maple, but also cedar, hemlock and pine, and near foraging habitat like an estuary or other waterway. By March the male of each pair is providing sticks for the female to build a nest or renovate an old nest. She lays three to five eggs, and both take turns incubating them for almost a month. By the end of May the eggs begin to hatch, and chicks grow rapidly, fed by both parents. The chicks first leave the nest at 7-8 weeks but usually return to be fed for another few weeks. By the end of September, the juveniles have fully fledged and disperse with adult females to upland rivers, lakes and wetlands to find prey. There they stay through the winter, roosting nightly at forest edges on lateral branching trees. Voles and other small mammals, reptiles and amphibians provide easy and abundant food around fields and marshes, and winter-returning salmon are taken from rivers and beaver ponds. Adult male herons maintain their shoreline territory over winter. Puget Sound's mega-colonies of great blue herons act as an anchor for an overall resilient population, but by being concentrated they are susceptible to disturbance, both natural and man-made. For example, in the 1990's a large ice storm destroyed the colony at Squaxin Island near Olympia, killing all the nest trees. If a major oil spill were to occur in Padilla Bay, the largest heron breeding center in the Salish Sea -- March Point and Samish Island colonies -- could be seriously impacted. Smaller colonies might be at greater risk of competition with other species or predation. At Edmonds Marsh, herons have tried to establish nests over the last dozen years, but fledglings have not yet been documented. Many heron-watchers assume nearby mature bald eagles are thwarting the herons' efforts. On the other hand, a bald eagle nesting pair near several heron nests at Point Roberts is more likely protecting both species' territory from raids by crows, ravens or immature eagles. Over the years, heron watchers throughout Puget Sound have seen both large and small colonies shrink, grow, and completely disappear. In 2010, the Kiwanis Ravine colony included some 80 successful nests, but by 2014 there were none. The now abandoned Black River colony in Renton once supported 130 nests. Today the Lake Sammamish State Park and Kenmore Park & Ride colonies are the largest in the Pierce/King/Snohomish county area. Eissinger has noted that many Puget Sound herons are well-adapted to human disturbance, including dogs, motor vehicle traffic, and industry noise. Nevertheless, heron colony watchers need to keep a respectful distance from nests. Keep pets on leash, minimize noise, and bring binoculars, scopes and telephoto camera lenses to enjoy these big birds. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This - 7:09 p.m. 6/9/2016
CROSSING PATHS WITH WASHINGTON'S
WILDLIFE

June 2016

Puget Sound's Great blue herons
provide summertime watching
By Jamie Bails, WDFW habitat
biologist

Even amidst fully-leafed-out trees at
this time of year, it's hard to miss
a great blue heron (Ardea herodias).

Four feet tall with a six-foot span
of blue-feathered wings, this big
bird is mostly beak, neck and legs.
It's commonly found in both rural and
urban areas of every Washington
county and can be even more
noticeable in the spring and summer
because it nests communally, in large
groups called heron rookeries or
colonies.

Although widely recognized, much is
still unknown about foraging,
seasonal dispersal, habitat
associations and winter distribution
of the great blue heron. Many eastern
Washington herons migrate south in
the fall, but others, especially on
the west side of the state, are year-
round residents.

The non-migratory Puget Sound
population is classified as a sub-
species (Ardea herodias fannini)
found only in the Salish Sea, a broad
area that stretches from Prince
William Sound to south Puget Sound.
What we DO know is that these herons
are an important indicator of the
health of Puget Sound.

According to "Great Blue Herons of
Puget Sound," a technical report by
Ann Eissinger published by the Puget
Sound Nearshore Partnership, 49
percent of this population is
concentrated in four mega-colonies of
200-600 heron pairs. The remaining 51
percent is in small to medium
colonies of less than 200 pairs,
scattered along the Puget Sound shore
from Bellingham to Olympia.

Many of the largest nest sites are in
northern Puget Sound near eelgrass
beds on marine shorelines, like the
March Point colony in Padilla Bay,
where several dozen herons are
frequently seen wading to feed on
herring, shrimp, crabs, sculpins,
starry flounder and other aquatic
life.

In south Puget Sound, where eelgrass
is not abundant, smaller colonies are
distributed by tree availability,
access to marsh foraging areas and
prey abundance. These smaller
southern colonies usually breed
earlier than those of the north and
Strait of Georgia.

Based on Eissinger's observations
over 25-plus years, some mega-
colonies appear to fragment, with
herons relocating to new and existing
nesting sites, usually closer to
productive marine feeding areas.

For example, a Point Roberts colony
of nearly 400 nesting pairs began to
fragment in 2002-2003, with about 350
pairs moving about two miles north to
the Tsawassen bluff, directly above
their primary feeding grounds at
Roberts Bank. Another case was the
Birch Bay colony of about 275 nesting
pairs, which fragmented and relocated
between 2006 and 2008 to a new site
at Drayton Harbor with about 100
nests, and to the Lummi Bay colony,
which grew by 50-100 nests.

Most great blue herons begin the
reproductive cycle in early February,
gathering at these traditional
communal nest sites. These sites are
usually in tall deciduous trees such
as alder, cottonwood and big leaf
maple, but also cedar, hemlock and
pine, and near foraging habitat like
an estuary or other waterway.

By March the male of each pair is
providing sticks for the female to
build a nest or renovate an old nest.
She lays three to five eggs, and both
take turns incubating them for almost
a month. By the end of May the eggs
begin to hatch, and chicks grow
rapidly, fed by both parents. The
chicks first leave the nest at 7-8
weeks but usually return to be fed
for another few weeks.

By the end of September, the
juveniles have fully fledged and
disperse with adult females to upland
rivers, lakes and wetlands to find
prey. There they stay through the
winter, roosting nightly at forest
edges on lateral branching trees.
Voles and other small mammals,
reptiles and amphibians provide easy
and abundant food around fields and
marshes, and winter-returning salmon
are taken from rivers and beaver
ponds. Adult male herons maintain
their shoreline territory over
winter.

Puget Sound's mega-colonies of great
blue herons act as an anchor for an
overall resilient population, but by
being concentrated they are
susceptible to disturbance, both
natural and man-made.

For example, in the 1990's a large
ice storm destroyed the colony at
Squaxin Island near Olympia, killing
all the nest trees. If a major oil
spill were to occur in Padilla Bay,
the largest heron breeding center in
the Salish Sea -- March Point and
Samish Island colonies -- could be
seriously impacted.

Smaller colonies might be at greater
risk of competition with other
species or predation. At Edmonds
Marsh, herons have tried to establish
nests over the last dozen years, but
fledglings have not yet been
documented. Many heron-watchers
assume nearby mature bald eagles are
thwarting the herons' efforts.

On the other hand, a bald eagle
nesting pair near several heron nests
at Point Roberts is more likely
protecting both species' territory
from raids by crows, ravens or
immature eagles.

Over the years, heron watchers
throughout Puget Sound have seen both
large and small colonies shrink,
grow, and completely disappear. In
2010, the Kiwanis Ravine colony
included some 80 successful nests,
but by 2014 there were none.

The now abandoned Black River colony
in Renton once supported 130 nests.
Today the Lake Sammamish State Park
and Kenmore Park & Ride colonies are
the largest in the
Pierce/King/Snohomish county area.

Eissinger has noted that many Puget
Sound herons are well-adapted to
human disturbance, including dogs,
motor vehicle traffic, and industry
noise. Nevertheless, heron colony
watchers need to keep a respectful
distance from nests. Keep pets on
leash, minimize noise, and bring
binoculars, scopes and telephoto
camera lenses to enjoy these big
birds.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------
This

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Columbia River spring chinook sport fishing Boat boundary lifted below Bonneville Dam Action: Lifts the boat boundary from Beacon Rock upstream to Bonneville Dam. Allows both boat and bank angling for salmonids in this area. Species affected: Spring chinook and steelhead Area: The mainstem Columbia River from the Tongue Point/ Rocky Point line upstream to Bonneville Dam. Restriction lifted: "A deadline marker on the Oregon bank (approximately four miles downstream from Bonneville Dam Powerhouse One) in a straight line through the western tip of Pierce Island to a deadline marker on the Washington bank at Beacon Rock." Effective date: June 10, 2016. Daily bag limit: Daily salmonid limit is 6 fish (hatchery chinook or hatchery steelhead), of which no more than two may be adult chinook or steelhead, and no more than one may be an adult chinook. Release all wild chinook and wild steelhead. Salmon minimum size: 12 inches. Reason for action: Harvestable numbers of hatchery salmon remain available based on the updated forecast, associated management agreements, and harvest estimates to date. Information contact: (360) 696-6211. For latest information press *1010. Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431. - 7:06 p.m. 6/9/2016
Columbia River spring chinook sport
fishing
Boat boundary lifted below Bonneville
Dam

Action: Lifts the boat boundary from
Beacon Rock upstream to Bonneville
Dam. Allows both boat and bank
angling for salmonids in this area.

Species affected: Spring chinook and
steelhead

Area: The mainstem Columbia River
from the Tongue Point/ Rocky Point
line upstream to Bonneville Dam.

Restriction lifted: "A deadline
marker on the Oregon bank
(approximately four miles downstream
from Bonneville Dam Powerhouse One)
in a straight line through the
western tip of Pierce Island to a
deadline marker on the Washington
bank at Beacon Rock."

Effective date: June 10, 2016.

Daily bag limit: Daily salmonid limit
is 6 fish (hatchery chinook or
hatchery steelhead), of which no more
than two may be adult chinook or
steelhead, and no more than one may
be an adult chinook. Release all wild
chinook and wild steelhead. Salmon
minimum size: 12 inches.

Reason for action: Harvestable
numbers of hatchery salmon remain
available based on the updated
forecast, associated management
agreements, and harvest estimates to
date.

Information contact: (360) 696-6211.
For latest information press *1010.

Fishers must have a current
Washington fishing license,
appropriate to the fishery. Check the
WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules
pamphlet for details on fishing
seasons and regulations. Fishing
rules are subject to change. Check
the WDFW Fishing hotline for the
latest rule information at (360) 902-
2500, press 2 for recreational rules.
For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline
call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-
866-880-5431.

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Snake River spring chinook fishery opens for two more days below Little Goose Dam Action: Spring chinook fishery to open for two days below Little Goose Dam. Species affected: Chinook salmon Locations: Below Little Goose Dam: Snake River from Texas Rapids boat launch (south side of the river upstream of the mouth of Tucannon River) to the fishing restriction boundary below Little Goose Dam. This zone includes the rock and concrete area between the juvenile bypass return pipe and Little Goose Dam along the south shoreline of the facility (includes the walkway area locally known as "the Wall" in front of the juvenile collection facility). Effective dates: June 12 and 13, 2016. Daily limit: 6 hatchery chinook (adipose fin clipped), of which no more than two may be an adult chinook salmon. For all areas open for chinook salmon harvest, anglers must cease fishing for salmon when the hatchery adult limit has been retained for the day. Reason for action: Based on the current harvest estimates, 130 adult hatchery chinook are available to harvest in the Snake River. WDFW anticipates that this additional fishery will utilize the majority of the remaining allotment of harvestable spring chinook in the Snake River. Other Information: The minimum size of any retained chinook salmon is 12 inches. Jacks are less than 24 inches long. The adipose fin-clipped chinook salmon that can be retained must have a healed scar at the location of the missing fin. All chinook salmon with the adipose fin intact, and all bull trout and steelhead, must be immediately released unharmed. In addition: Anglers fishing for all species, in the areas open for chinook salmon, during the days of the week the salmon fishery is open in that area, must use barbless hooks. Only single point barbless hooks are allowed when fishing for sturgeon. A night closure is in effect for salmon and sturgeon. It is unlawful to use any hook larger than 5/8 inch (point of hook to shank) when fishing for all species except sturgeon. Anglers cannot remove any chinook salmon or steelhead from the water unless it is retained as part of the daily bag limit. Anglers are reminded to refer to the 2015-16 Fishing in Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet for other regulations, including safety closures and closed waters. - 12:05 p.m. 6/8/2016
Snake River spring chinook fishery
opens
for two more days below Little Goose
Dam

Action: Spring chinook fishery to
open for two days below Little Goose
Dam.

Species affected: Chinook salmon

Locations: Below Little Goose Dam:
Snake River from Texas Rapids boat
launch (south side of the river
upstream of the mouth of Tucannon
River) to the fishing restriction
boundary below Little Goose Dam. This
zone includes the rock and concrete
area between the juvenile bypass
return pipe and Little Goose Dam
along the south shoreline of the
facility (includes the walkway area
locally known as "the Wall" in front
of the juvenile collection facility).

Effective dates: June 12 and 13,
2016.

Daily limit: 6 hatchery chinook
(adipose fin clipped), of which no
more than two may be an adult chinook
salmon. For all areas open for
chinook salmon harvest, anglers must
cease fishing for salmon when the
hatchery adult limit has been
retained for the day.

Reason for action: Based on the
current harvest estimates, 130 adult
hatchery chinook are available to
harvest in the Snake River. WDFW
anticipates that this additional
fishery will utilize the majority of
the remaining allotment of
harvestable spring chinook in the
Snake River.

Other Information: The minimum size
of any retained chinook salmon is 12
inches. Jacks are less than 24 inches
long. The adipose fin-clipped chinook
salmon that can be retained must have
a healed scar at the location of the
missing fin. All chinook salmon with
the adipose fin intact, and all bull
trout and steelhead, must be
immediately released unharmed.

In addition: Anglers fishing for all
species, in the areas open for
chinook salmon, during the days of
the week the salmon fishery is open
in that area, must use barbless
hooks. Only single point barbless
hooks are allowed when fishing for
sturgeon. A night closure is in
effect for salmon and sturgeon. It is
unlawful to use any hook larger than
5/8 inch (point of hook to shank)
when fishing for all species except
sturgeon. Anglers cannot remove any
chinook salmon or steelhead from the
water unless it is retained as part
of the daily bag limit.

Anglers are reminded to refer to the
2015-16 Fishing in Washington Sport
Fishing Rules pamphlet for other
regulations, including safety
closures and closed waters.


Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Nearshore halibut fishery in Marine Area 1 to close June 9 Action: The Marine Area 1 (Columbia River) nearshore quota is projected to be taken. Effective date: June 9, 2016 Species affected: Pacific halibut Location: Marine Area 1 Reason for action: The Marine Area 1 recreational halibut fishery has taken the Pacific halibut quota set aside for the nearshore fishery. There are not enough quota pounds remaining for another day, this area will be closed to recreational halibut fishing for the remainder of the year. This rule conforms to federal action taken by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and the International Pacific Halibut Commission (IPHC). Information contact: Heather Reed, (360) 249-4628, ext. 202 Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. - 8:59 p.m. 6/7/2016
Nearshore halibut fishery in Marine
Area 1 to close June 9

Action: The Marine Area 1 (Columbia
River) nearshore quota is projected
to be taken.

Effective date: June 9, 2016

Species affected: Pacific halibut

Location: Marine Area 1

Reason for action: The Marine Area 1
recreational halibut fishery has
taken the Pacific halibut quota set
aside for the nearshore fishery.
There are not enough quota pounds
remaining for another day, this area
will be closed to recreational
halibut fishing for the remainder of
the year. This rule conforms to
federal action taken by the National
Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and
the International Pacific Halibut
Commission (IPHC).

Information contact: Heather Reed,
(360) 249-4628, ext. 202

Fishers must have a current
Washington fishing license,
appropriate to the fishery. Check the
WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules
pamphlet for details on fishing
seasons and regulations. Fishing
rules are subject to change. Check
the WDFW Fishing hotline for the
latest rule information at (360) 902-
2500, press 2 for recreational rules.
For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline
call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-
866-880-5431.
Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Middle Yakima River to open for hatchery spring chinook Action: Open the middle section of the Yakima River to fishing for hatchery spring chinook salmon. Species affected: Chinook salmon. Location: From the Interstate 82 bridge at Union Gap (river mile 107.1) to the BNSF railroad bridge, approximately 600 feet downstream of Roza Dam (river mile 127.8). Dates: June 9 through June 30, 2016. Reason for action: Yakama Nation (YN) and WDFW fishery managers are forecasting a return of 4,610 adult spring chinook to the Yakima River in 2016 (3,100 wild and 1,510 hatchery fish). This represents 55% of the average adult return of 8,320 spring chinook over the past 10 years (2006-2015). Consequently, the daily limit has been reduced from two to one hatchery fish and the season length has been shortened. Other information: Daily limit of one hatchery chinook. Hatchery salmon are identified by a missing adipose fin and a healed scar in the location of the missing fin. Wild chinook (adipose fin intact) must be immediately released unharmed and cannot be removed from the water prior to release. For the duration of this salmon fishery, the upper "closed water" boundary line is moved upstream to the railroad bridge downstream of Roza Dam to provide additional opportunity to harvest hatchery chinook. During the salmon fishery, the "Selective Gear Rules" prohibiting use of bait and knotted nets is temporarily suspended, but only in the river section open to salmon fishing. Terminal gear is restricted to two, single-point, barbless hooks with a hook gap from point to shank of 3/4 inch or less when fishing for salmon. Use of bait is allowed. Night closure in effect. Fishing for steelhead remains closed. All steelhead (rainbow trout greater than 20" in total length) must be immediately released unharmed and cannot be removed from the water prior to release. A Columbia River Salmon/Steelhead Endorsement is required to participate in this fishery except for "Free Fishing Weekend", June 11-12 (recording salmon catch on a free Catch Record Card is required on Free Fishing Weekend). The use of two (2) fishing poles is permitted during the salmon fishery provided the participating angler has purchased a "Two-Pole Endorsement" (in addition to the freshwater fishing license and Columbia River salmon/steelhead endorsement). Fishing from boats equipped with an internal combustion motor (ICM) is allowed only from the I-82 bridge at Union Gap to the east-bound (upstream) I-82 bridge at Selah Gap. Boats with an ICM may be used for transportation only upstream of the Selah Gap bridge. Closed to fishing for all species 400 feet upstream from the upstream side of the Yakima Ave. /Terrace Heights Rd. bridge in Yakima, including the area adjacent and downstream of the Roza Wasteway No. 2 fish barrier rack next to Morton & Sons Inc. Information contacts: Eric Anderson, District 8 Fish Biologist, (509) 457-9301 (Yakima) or John Easterbrooks, Regional Fish Program Manager, (509) 457-9330 (Yakima). Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list. Visit the Emergency Fishing Rule Website at: https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/ To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html - 5:32 p.m. 6/6/2016
Middle Yakima River to open for
hatchery spring chinook

Action: Open the middle section of
the Yakima River to fishing for
hatchery spring chinook salmon.

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Location: From the Interstate 82
bridge at Union Gap (river mile
107.1) to the BNSF railroad bridge,
approximately 600 feet downstream of
Roza Dam (river mile 127.8).

Dates: June 9 through June 30, 2016.

Reason for action: Yakama Nation (YN)
and WDFW fishery managers are
forecasting a return of 4,610 adult
spring chinook to the Yakima River in
2016 (3,100 wild and 1,510 hatchery
fish). This represents 55% of the
average adult return of 8,320 spring
chinook over the past 10 years (2006-
2015). Consequently, the daily limit
has been reduced from two to one
hatchery fish and the season length
has been shortened.

Other information:

Daily limit of one hatchery chinook.
Hatchery salmon are identified by a
missing adipose fin and a healed scar
in the location of the missing fin.
Wild chinook (adipose fin intact)
must be immediately released unharmed
and cannot be removed from the water
prior to release.
For the duration of this salmon
fishery, the upper "closed water"
boundary line is moved upstream to
the railroad bridge downstream of
Roza Dam to provide additional
opportunity to harvest hatchery
chinook.
During the salmon fishery, the
"Selective Gear Rules" prohibiting
use of bait and knotted nets is
temporarily suspended, but only in
the river section open to salmon
fishing.
Terminal gear is restricted to two,
single-point, barbless hooks with a
hook gap from point to shank of 3/4
inch or less when fishing for salmon.
Use of bait is allowed.
Night closure in effect.
Fishing for steelhead remains closed.
All steelhead (rainbow trout greater
than 20" in total length) must be
immediately released unharmed and
cannot be removed from the water
prior to release.
A Columbia River Salmon/Steelhead
Endorsement is required to
participate in this fishery except
for "Free Fishing Weekend", June 11-
12 (recording salmon catch on a free
Catch Record Card is required on Free
Fishing Weekend).
The use of two (2) fishing poles is
permitted during the salmon fishery
provided the participating angler has
purchased a "Two-Pole Endorsement"
(in addition to the freshwater
fishing license and Columbia River
salmon/steelhead endorsement).
Fishing from boats equipped with an
internal combustion motor (ICM) is
allowed only from the I-82 bridge at
Union Gap to the east-bound
(upstream) I-82 bridge at Selah Gap.
Boats with an ICM may be used for
transportation only upstream of the
Selah Gap bridge.
Closed to fishing for all species 400
feet upstream from the upstream side
of the Yakima Ave. /Terrace Heights
Rd. bridge in Yakima, including the
area adjacent and downstream of the
Roza Wasteway No. 2 fish barrier rack
next to Morton & Sons Inc.
Information contacts: Eric Anderson,
District 8 Fish Biologist, (509) 457-
9301 (Yakima) or John Easterbrooks,
Regional Fish Program Manager, (509)
457-9330 (Yakima).

Fishers must have a current
Washington fishing license,
appropriate to the fishery. Check the
WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules
pamphlet for details on fishing
seasons and regulations. Fishing
rules are subject to change. Check
the WDFW Fishing hotline for the
latest rule information at (360) 902-
2500, press 2 for recreational rules.
For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline
call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-
866-880-5431.
Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to the
WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the Emergency Fishing Rule
Website at:
https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/ef
ishrules/
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing
list:
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.
html

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Hanford Reach summer salmon fishery changes Actions: Closes sockeye salmon to retention Effective date: June 16 through Aug. 15, 2016 Species affected: Sockeye salmon Area 1: Columbia River from Hwy. 395 Bridge at Pasco to the Interstate 182 Bridge at Richland near Columbia Point (CRC 534) Daily Limit: Daily limit of three (3) salmon, of which no more than one (1) may be adult hatchery chinook. Release wild adult chinook and sockeye. Area 2: Columbia River from the Interstate 182 Bridge to Priest Rapids Dam (CRC 535 and 536) Daily Limit: Daily limit of four (4) salmon, of which no more than two (2) may be adult hatchery chinook. Release wild adult chinook and sockeye. Other information: Anglers must use barbless hooks when fishing for salmon and must have a current Washington fishing license, as well as a Columbia River Salmon and Steelhead Endorsement (CRSSE). Anglers may fish with two poles with the Two-Pole Endorsement, except for sturgeon. Reason for action: The pre-season forecast for upper Columbia River sockeye salmon is only for about 102,000 fish returning to the river mouth. This run abundance is insufficient to support sockeye harvest in the upper Columbia River and meet spawning escapement goals in the Wenatchee and Okanogan basins. Achieving a successful sockeye spawn in 2016 is extremely important following the massive mortality and poor spawning escapement of upper Columbia sockeye caused by the drought and high water temperatures in 2015. These changes were proposed and discussed during the North of Falcon salmon season rule-setting public process and will be adopted by permanent rule later this summer and be published in the 2016-17 sport fishing rules pamphlet. Information contacts: Paul Hoffarth, District 4 Fish Biologist, (509) 545-2284 (Pasco) or John Easterbrooks, Regional Fish Program Manager, (509) 457-9330. Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list. Visit the Emergency Fishing Rule Website at: https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/ To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html - 3:54 p.m. 6/3/2016
Hanford Reach summer salmon fishery
changes

Actions: Closes sockeye salmon to
retention

Effective date: June 16 through Aug.
15, 2016

Species affected: Sockeye salmon

Area 1: Columbia River from Hwy. 395
Bridge at Pasco to the Interstate 182
Bridge at Richland near Columbia
Point (CRC 534)

Daily Limit: Daily limit of three (3)
salmon, of which no more than one (1)
may be adult hatchery chinook.
Release wild adult chinook and
sockeye.

Area 2: Columbia River from the
Interstate 182 Bridge to Priest
Rapids Dam (CRC 535 and 536)

Daily Limit: Daily limit of four (4)
salmon, of which no more than two (2)
may be adult hatchery chinook.
Release wild adult chinook and
sockeye.

Other information: Anglers must use
barbless hooks when fishing for
salmon and must have a current
Washington fishing license, as well
as a Columbia River Salmon and
Steelhead Endorsement (CRSSE).
Anglers may fish with two poles with
the Two-Pole Endorsement, except for
sturgeon.

Reason for action: The pre-season
forecast for upper Columbia River
sockeye salmon is only for about
102,000 fish returning to the river
mouth. This run abundance is
insufficient to support sockeye
harvest in the upper Columbia River
and meet spawning escapement goals in
the Wenatchee and Okanogan basins.
Achieving a successful sockeye spawn
in 2016 is extremely important
following the massive mortality and
poor spawning escapement of upper
Columbia sockeye caused by the
drought and high water temperatures
in 2015.

These changes were proposed and
discussed during the North of Falcon
salmon season rule-setting public
process and will be adopted by
permanent rule later this summer and
be published in the 2016-17 sport
fishing rules pamphlet.

Information contacts: Paul Hoffarth,
District 4 Fish Biologist, (509) 545-
2284 (Pasco) or John Easterbrooks,
Regional Fish Program Manager, (509)
457-9330.

Fishers must have a current
Washington fishing license,
appropriate to the fishery. Check the
WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules
pamphlet for details on fishing
seasons and regulations. Fishing
rules are subject to change. Check
the WDFW Fishing hotline for the
latest rule information at (360) 902-
2500, press 2 for recreational rules.
For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline
call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-
866-880-5431.
Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to the
WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the Emergency Fishing Rule
Website at:
https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/ef
ishrules/
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing
list:
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.
html

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Kids with special needs can hook big trout at Merwin fishing event VANCOUVER, Wash. Children with disabilities will have a chance to reel in some big trout during a special fishing event July 9 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Merwin Fish Hatchery, east of Woodland. More than 100 young people and their families are expected to turn out for the 18th annual Merwin Special Kids Day, sponsored by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and Pacific Power. Sponsors ask that participants be pre-registered by June 30 by calling 1-800-899-4421. Prior to the event, WDFW will plant the wheelchair-accessible hatchery waters with up to 3,000 trout ranging in size from one to four pounds each. Volunteers will then serve as one-on-one fishing coaches, assisting youngsters throughout the day. Rods, reels, tackle and T-shirts will be provided for the young fishers to use and keep. A free barbecue lunch will be served, followed by a casting contest and other activities. Instituted in 1999, the annual fishing event draws youngsters from the Vancouver School for the Blind, Doernbecher Children's Hospital, Emanuel Legacy, Kaiser Kids and Shriners hospitals, but anyone will a special-needs child is invited to join in the fun. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. - 12:20 p.m. 6/2/2016
Kids with special needs can hook big
trout at Merwin fishing event

VANCOUVER, Wash. Children with
disabilities will have a chance to
reel in some big trout during a
special fishing event July 9 from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Merwin Fish
Hatchery, east of Woodland.

More than 100 young people and their
families are expected to turn out for
the 18th annual Merwin Special Kids
Day, sponsored by the Washington
Department of Fish and Wildlife
(WDFW) and Pacific Power.

Sponsors ask that participants be
pre-registered by June 30 by calling
1-800-899-4421.

Prior to the event, WDFW will plant
the wheelchair-accessible hatchery
waters with up to 3,000 trout ranging
in size from one to four pounds each.
Volunteers will then serve as one-on-
one fishing coaches, assisting
youngsters throughout the day.

Rods, reels, tackle and T-shirts will
be provided for the young fishers to
use and keep. A free barbecue lunch
will be served, followed by a casting
contest and other activities.

Instituted in 1999, the annual
fishing event draws youngsters from
the Vancouver School for the Blind,
Doernbecher Children's Hospital,
Emanuel Legacy, Kaiser Kids and
Shriners hospitals, but anyone will a
special-needs child is invited to
join in the fun.

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Viewing Fishing Reports 11-20 (114 reports)

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For fishing pictures go to LewisRiver.com monthy fishing pictures.
For more information go to Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Call 1.800.547.1501 for updated reservoir levels and estimated river flow below Merwin.
For N. F . Lewis River flow go to River Flows At Ariel.
For East Fork Lewis River flow go to East Fork Lewis River Near Heisson, Wa.

Stream flow and reservoir levels at:
Lewis River at Woodland       Speelyai Creek      Muddy Creek
Lewis River at Ariel      Lewis River Reservoir Levels

We are very pleased to offer you this fishing report site. Please only post reports or information that is of interest to all. Many people want a fast report and don't have time to read a lot of other stuff. Inappropriate posts will be deleted. Thanks, Noel Johnson.

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