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Merwin/Yale - 5:11 p.m. 2/2/2016
How is winter fishing on merwin or yale? It has always been a sprin-fall fishery for me and have never really thought about it for winter. Any info would be appreciated. Thanks

Isaac - battle ground, wa

CROSSING PATHS WITH WASHINGTON'S WILDLIFE - 9:12 a.m. 2/2/2016
CROSSING PATHS WITH WASHINGTON'S WILDLIFE

February 2016

Get nest boxes ready for new occupants

Spring may officially be several weeks off, but now is the time to get your bird nest boxes cleaned out and ready for new, incoming occupants.

If you don’t already have nest boxes up, this is the time to either build or buy and place them, following our specs at http://wdfw.wa.gov/living/projects/nestboxes/index.html

Many backyard birding enthusiasts who use nest boxes leave them up year-round and leave nesting materials in them through the winter, when some birds will use them as nightime roost sites.

But migrating birds that use cavities for nesting, like bluebirds, swallows and wrens, will be returning next month and they prefer clean quarters to follow their instincts to build their own nests.

All nest boxes attract insects – mites, lice, fleas, flies, hornets, spiders and more. In small numbers they are relatively harmless to birds, but in larger numbers they can cause injuries and even fatalities to young birds.

Inspect all nest boxes to clean out insects and also to remove the old nesting material. Although some diligent and industrious birds will remove old nesting material before building their own particular nest, many more will just build on top of an old nest. That kind of layering can raise the nest dangerously close to the entrance hole where predators might reach eggs or young.

Your inspection may turn up dead nestlings or infertile eggs, which of course should also be removed. Be sure to use protective gloves, maybe even a dust mask, and dispose of everything you find in nest boxes away from the site to avoid smells that can attract predators.

Nest box maintenance includes tightening screws, loosening lag bolts, unblocking drainage holes, and generally making sure everything is secure and working right.

If you find a nest box in your collection that year after year goes unused, consider relocating it. It might not be in the appropriate habitat or suitable height location for the species it’s built for, or perhaps it’s in the right place but is not built correctly. Check the entrance hole size, overall size dimensions, and other factors that are important to, and different for, various species of nest-box-using birds. Details are available at http://wdfw.wa.gov/living/projects/nestboxes/index.html

If the same nest box turns up dead nestlings or infertile eggs more than once, consider relocation to avoid competitors or predators, or remodeling to protect the species using the box. A predator block – just a one-inch thick piece of wood drilled with the appropriate size hole – mounted over the entrance hole to create a short tunnel into the nest, can deter starlings, raccoons, or squirrels that have chewed the original hole bigger.

Another improvement is to remove any perch post projecting out from the front of a nest box. Our native cavity-nesting birds don’t need these perches but they are used by more aggressive non-native birds to harass nesting birds.

If you often have earlier-arriving starlings or English house sparrows dominating your nest box site, you may want to plug the entrance hole until later this spring when martins or swallows or other native species arrive. Small paper cups and other such plugs work well. Remember to remove the plug as soon as you see your “target” species return to the area, or when you otherwise learn of its return to your area. (Online birding chat groups can be a good source of news about migratory bird movements.)

If you watch a nest box closely enough this spring to know when birds have finished raising a brood, you can clean out the box again to encourage another pair to use it or the same pair to nest again. Just don’t bother an obviously occupied nest box.

Noel Johnson - Woodland WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Winter steelhead: Anglers are still reeling in hatchery steelhead from area tributaries, notably the Cowlitz and Kalama rivers. The daily limit for adult steelhead on most area rivers is three marked, hatchery-reared fish. Barbless hooks are required, and any steelhead with an intact adipose fin must be released. In addition, anglers must keep the first three hatchery steelhead they catch. - 9:10 p.m. 2/1/2016
Winter steelhead: Anglers are still reeling in hatchery steelhead from area tributaries, notably the Cowlitz and Kalama rivers. The daily limit for adult steelhead on most area rivers is three marked, hatchery-reared fish. Barbless hooks are required, and any steelhead with an intact adipose fin must be released. In addition, anglers must keep the first three hatchery steelhead they catch.

Spring chinook: The fishery is now open below the Interstate 5 Bridge, with a daily limit of two adult spring chinook per day. But the action usually doesn't pick up until March, when new rules adopted by Washington and Oregon take effect. "This is a good time to dust off your gear, order your bait, prepare your boat, and maybe do a little prospecting," said Joe Hymer, a WDFW fish biologist.

Anticipating a return of 299,200 adult spring chinook salmon, fishery managers from the two states set this year's initial fishing season on the lower Columbia River to run through April 9. See the news release on WDFW's website for more information.

Smelt: The Cowlitz River will be open to recreational dip netting for one six-hour period from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 6 under rules recently approved by WDFW. No fishing license is required, and each dip-netter may retain 10 pounds of smelt per day (roughly equivalent to a quarter of a five-gallon bucket). Smelt must be dipped from the shore; no boats are allowed in the fishery.

Noel Johnson - Woodland Wa 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

WDFW approves month-long razor clam dig at Long Beach - 3:35 p.m. 1/29/2016
WDFW approves month-long razor clam dig at Long Beach

OLYMPIA – Razor clam diggers can look forward to more than a month of razor clam digging opportunities at Long Beach on the Washington coast.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the dig, which runs from Feb. 4 through March 10, at Long Beach after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat.

All other beaches remain closed to recreational razor clam digging.

The department approved this extended opening due to the abundance of clams available at Long Beach, said Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager.

“We had a late start to the digging season, so we still have plenty of clams to dig at Long Beach,” Ayres said. “We’re thrilled to be able to announce this lengthy opening.”

The dig at Long Beach is on evening tides. No digging will be allowed before noon any day. Diggers should check tide charts before heading out, since tides of one foot or above aren’t conducive to digging, Ayres said.

“For the best digging conditions, we advise people to plan their trips to the beach when the evening low tides are less than one foot,” Ayres said.

Ayres noted the best digging usually occurs one to two hours prior to low tide

The first week of the upcoming dig at Long Beach is scheduled on the following dates and low tides:

Feb. 4, Thursday, 3:41 p.m.; 0.8 feet, Long Beach,
Feb. 5, Friday, 4:28 p.m.; 0.2 feet, Long Beach
Feb. 6, Saturday, 5:11 p.m.; -0.3 feet, Long Beach
Feb. 7, Sunday, 5:52 p.m.; -0.7 feet, Long Beach
Feb. 8, Monday, 6:32 p.m.; -1.0 feet, Long Beach
Feb. 9, Tuesday, 7:12 p.m.; -0.9 feet, Long Beach
Feb. 10, Wednesday, 7:52 p.m.; -0.7 feet, Long Beach
For tidal information at Long Beach beginning Feb. 11, diggers should check the tide charts listed on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s webpage at http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/map/
Additionally, a list of tides will be posted on WDFW’s razor clam webpage http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/ Diggers should also check the website for announcements about openings at other Washington beaches.

Although toxin tests at Copalis beach show clams are safe to eat, shellfish managers are limiting digging there to help ensure the beach will have openings throughout the spring.

“Copalis was the first beach to open this season and we’ve already harvested nearly 40 percent of our annual quota,” Ayres said.

Razor clam digging will remain closed on Washington’s other coastal beaches until domoic acid levels drop below the threshold of 20 parts per million set by state public health officials. The natural toxin produced by certain types of marine algae can be harmful or even fatal if consumed in sufficient quantities.

WDFW is continuing to monitor toxin levels on all Washington beaches and will open other areas as soon as clams are safe to eat. Toxin test results can be found on WDFW’s domoic acid webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/domoic_levels.html

Diggers should monitor WDFW’s main razor clam webpage for any potential changes to the Long Beach opening.

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger's clams must be kept in a separate container.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2015-16 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW's website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

States set seasons for spring chinook, sturgeon, smelt in Columbia River Basin VANCOUVER, Wash. – Anticipating a return of 299,200 adult spring chinook salmon, fishery managers from Washington and Oregon today set this year’s initial fishing season to run through April 9 on the lower Columbia River. In addition, representatives from the two states agreed to close the winter sturgeon retention fishery in the Bonneville Pool effective Feb. 8 and approved a six-hour recreational smelt season Feb. 6 on the Cowlitz River. Here are the major provisions of those agreements: Spring chinook: From March 1 through April 9, anglers fishing downriver from Bonneville Dam may retain one marked, hatchery-reared adult spring chinook as part of their daily catch limit. The fishery will be open to both boat and bank anglers upriver to Beacon Rock, and – for bank anglers only – from there upriver to the fishing boundary just below the dam. The sport fishery will close in all areas of the lower Columbia River on two Tuesdays – March 29 and April 5 – to accommodate potential commercial fisheries. Upstream of Bonneville Dam, anglers may retain one hatchery-reared adult spring chinook per day from March 16 through May 6 between the Tower Island powerlines and the Washington/Oregon state line. Bank anglers using hand-casted gear (no boats) can also fish from Bonneville Dam upriver to the Tower Island powerlines during that time. Barbless hooks are required to fish for spring chinook in the Columbia River and anglers must release any salmon or steelhead not visibly marked as a hatchery fish by a clipped adipose fin. Sturgeon: The recreational sturgeon retention fishery between Bonneville Dam and The Dalles Dam will close Feb. 8. By that time, fishery managers expect that anglers will have reeled in 140 sturgeon from those waters, leaving 185 available for a one-or-two day fishery in summer. Catch-and-release fishing remains an option until then. Smelt: As in the past two years, fishery managers approved a limited fishery for smelt on the Cowlitz River to help gather data on the species’ abundance. Recreational smelt dipping will be restricted to the hours of 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 6. The limit per person is 10 pounds – about one-quarter of a five-gallon bucket. Smelt dipping is not allowed from boats. To support the data-collection effort, the two states also approved a limited gillnet fishery for smelt in February on the lower Columbia River. The area’s smelt population was listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act in 2010, but runs have shown some signs of improvement since then. Fishing rules reflecting these actions are available on the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (WDFW) website at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/ Fishing for spring chinook is currently open on a daily basis from Buoy 10 near the mouth of the Columbia River upstream to the Interstate 5 Bridge, although the bulk of the run doesn’t arrive until mid-March when the new fishing rules will be in effect. Catch guidelines approved for the popular fishery will allow anglers fishing below Bonneville Dam to catch approximately 9,100 hatchery-raised “springers” before an updated run forecast is completed in late April or early May. Another 1,000 adult upriver - 5:14 p.m. 1/28/2016
States set seasons for spring
chinook,
sturgeon, smelt in Columbia River
Basin

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Anticipating a
return of 299,200 adult spring
chinook salmon, fishery managers from
Washington and Oregon today set this
year’s initial fishing season to run
through April 9 on the lower Columbia
River.

In addition, representatives from the
two states agreed to close the winter
sturgeon retention fishery in the
Bonneville Pool effective Feb. 8 and
approved a six-hour recreational
smelt season Feb. 6 on the Cowlitz
River.

Here are the major provisions of
those agreements:

Spring chinook: From March 1 through
April 9, anglers fishing downriver
from Bonneville Dam may retain one
marked, hatchery-reared adult spring
chinook as part of their daily catch
limit. The fishery will be open to
both boat and bank anglers upriver to
Beacon Rock, and – for bank anglers
only – from there upriver to the
fishing boundary just below the dam.

The sport fishery will close in all
areas of the lower Columbia River on
two Tuesdays – March 29 and April 5 –
to accommodate potential commercial
fisheries.

Upstream of Bonneville Dam, anglers
may retain one hatchery-reared adult
spring chinook per day from March 16
through May 6 between the Tower
Island powerlines and the
Washington/Oregon state line. Bank
anglers using hand-casted gear (no
boats) can also fish from Bonneville
Dam upriver to the Tower Island
powerlines during that time.

Barbless hooks are required to fish
for spring chinook in the Columbia
River and anglers must release any
salmon or steelhead not visibly
marked as a hatchery fish by a
clipped adipose fin.
Sturgeon: The recreational sturgeon
retention fishery between Bonneville
Dam and The Dalles Dam will close
Feb. 8. By that time, fishery
managers expect that anglers will
have reeled in 140 sturgeon from
those waters, leaving 185 available
for a one-or-two day fishery in
summer. Catch-and-release fishing
remains an option until then.
Smelt: As in the past two years,
fishery managers approved a limited
fishery for smelt on the Cowlitz
River to help gather data on the
species’ abundance. Recreational
smelt dipping will be restricted to
the hours of 7 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 6. The limit per
person is 10 pounds – about one-
quarter of a five-gallon bucket.
Smelt dipping is not allowed from
boats.

To support the data-collection
effort, the two states also approved
a limited gillnet fishery for smelt
in February on the lower Columbia
River. The area’s smelt population
was listed as threatened under the
federal Endangered Species Act in
2010, but runs have shown some signs
of improvement since then.
Fishing rules reflecting these
actions are available on the
Washington Department of Fish and
Wildlife’s (WDFW) website at
https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/ef
ishrules/

Fishing for spring chinook is
currently open on a daily basis from
Buoy 10 near the mouth of the
Columbia River upstream to the
Interstate 5 Bridge, although the
bulk of the run doesn’t arrive until
mid-March when the new fishing rules
will be in effect.

Catch guidelines approved for the
popular fishery will allow anglers
fishing below Bonneville Dam to catch
approximately 9,100 hatchery-raised
“springers” before an updated run
forecast is completed in late April
or early May.

Another 1,000 adult upriver

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Anglers limited to 1 chinook per day in Marine Area 6 Action: The daily catch limit for chinook salmon in Marine Area 6 (East Juan de Fuca Strait) will be reduced to 1 fish, with a 2 salmon limit. All wild chinook salmon must be released. Effective Date: Feb. 5 through April 10, 2016. Species affected: Chinook salmon. Location: Marine Area 6 within Puget Sound. Reason for action: Before the salmon fishing season started, WDFW and tribal co-managers agreed to a limited number (2,586) of chinook encounters - retaining or releasing fish - anglers are allowed in Marine Area 6. Preliminary estimates indicate that anglers have reached 71 percent of those encounters. The fishery is being modified to control impacts on stocks of concern. Other information: WDFW will continue to monitor and evaluate the fishery in order to help maximize fishing opportunity is available for Marine Area 6. Anglers are reminded that they must continue to release all wild chinook. Information contact: Ryan Lothrop, (360) 902-2808. Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list. Visit the Emergency Fishing Rule Website at: https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/ To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html - 5:12 p.m. 1/28/2016
Anglers limited to 1 chinook per day
in Marine Area 6

Action: The daily catch limit for
chinook salmon in Marine Area 6 (East
Juan de Fuca Strait) will be reduced
to 1 fish, with a 2 salmon limit. All
wild chinook salmon must be released.

Effective Date: Feb. 5 through April
10, 2016.

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Location: Marine Area 6 within Puget
Sound.

Reason for action: Before the salmon
fishing season started, WDFW and
tribal co-managers agreed to a
limited number (2,586) of chinook
encounters - retaining or releasing
fish - anglers are allowed in Marine
Area 6. Preliminary estimates
indicate that anglers have reached 71
percent of those encounters. The
fishery is being modified to control
impacts on stocks of concern.

Other information: WDFW will continue
to monitor and evaluate the fishery
in order to help maximize fishing
opportunity is available for Marine
Area 6. Anglers are reminded that
they must continue to release all
wild chinook.

Information contact: Ryan Lothrop,
(360) 902-2808.

Fishers must have a current
Washington fishing license,
appropriate to the fishery. Check the
WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules
pamphlet for details on fishing
seasons and regulations. Fishing
rules are subject to change. Check
the WDFW Fishing hotline for the
latest rule information at (360) 902-
2500, press 2 for recreational rules.
For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline
call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-
866-880-5431.
Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to the
WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the Emergency Fishing Rule
Website at:
https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/ef
ishrules/
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing
list:
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.
html

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Idaho angler breaks opah sport fish record OLYMPIA – Jim Watson of Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, has set a new state record for the largest opah caught off the Washington coast, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) confirmed today. Watson caught the fish–a large-eyed, orange-red colored, disc-shaped giant–while fishing with anchovies 45 miles offshore of Westport in Grays Harbor County in September. It weighed 35.67 pounds and measured 37-7/8 inches. “Catching the fish was a lot of work, but fun. They really fight, and it took a while,” said Watson. “The captain and crew came unglued, because you just don’t see these fish very often.” Watson shared the fish with the charter crew, family and friends. “It was not like any fish I’ve tasted, but it was really good,” said Watson. “Every bit of it went to good use.” Opah are the only fish found to be warm blooded throughout their bodies, a discovery first reported in the journal Science in May. The new opah record exceeded the previous by 7.49 pounds. That record was held by Rick Shapland on a fish that was also caught in the Pacific Ocean off of Westport in 2013. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. - 8:31 p.m. 11/19/2015
Idaho angler breaks opah sport fish
record

OLYMPIA – Jim Watson of Coeur
d’Alene, Idaho, has set a new state
record for the largest opah caught
off the Washington coast, the
Washington Department of Fish and
Wildlife (WDFW) confirmed today.

Watson caught the fish–a large-eyed,
orange-red colored, disc-shaped
giant–while fishing with anchovies 45
miles offshore of Westport in Grays
Harbor County in September. It
weighed 35.67 pounds and measured 37-
7/8 inches.

“Catching the fish was a lot of work,
but fun. They really fight, and it
took a while,” said Watson. “The
captain and crew came unglued,
because you just don’t see these fish
very often.”

Watson shared the fish with the
charter crew, family and friends.
“It was not like any fish I’ve
tasted, but it was really good,” said
Watson. “Every bit of it went to good
use.”

Opah are the only fish found to be
warm blooded throughout their bodies,
a discovery first reported in the
journal Science in May.

The new opah record exceeded the
previous by 7.49 pounds. That record
was held by Rick Shapland on a fish
that was also caught in the Pacific
Ocean off of Westport in 2013.

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

We're not all idiots - 4:35 p.m. 8/19/2015
Noel...this is a great source of info and
most of us are very thankful that you
provide this report. Only the slow
thinkers will question its validity and
gripe. Don't let it hamper you one bit.

KalamaDave

Idaho angler shatters Washington - 4:30 p.m. 7/15/2015
Idaho angler shatters Washington
tiger trout sport fish record

OLYMPIA – Kelly Flaherty of Priest River, Idaho, has set a new state record for the largest tiger trout caught in Washington, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) confirmed today.

The 53-year-old angler caught the 18.49-pound fish measuring 32.5 inches on Cinco de Mayo, May 5, while bait fishing with a worm and egg at Bonaparte Lake, near Tonasket in Okanogan County.

“The fish skyrocketed out of the water,” said Flaherty, who was fishing from a boat launch. “As soon as I hooked it, I was whooping it up, while a crowd gathered around the whole time.”

Flaherty estimates it took him 15 minutes to land the fish from the time he set the hook until he pulled his prize onto the boat launch without a landing net.

According to WDFW, the new record exceeded the previous record tiger trout record by 3.45 pounds. The previous record was held by Kirk Herrin on a fish caught in Roses Lake, Chelan County in 2012.

Noel Johnson
Noel
www.lewisriver.com

Ellensburg angler breaks Pacific bluefin tuna record - 6:14 p.m. 11/25/2014
Ellensburg angler breaks Pacific bluefin tuna record

OLYMPIA - Sam Ellinger of Ellensburg has set a new state record for the largest Pacific bluefin tuna caught off the coast of Washington, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) confirmed today.

The 39.20 pound fish measured 41 inches and was caught 28 miles offshore southwest of Grays Harbor, while bait fishing with anchovies.

Ellinger, a student at Central Washington University, said he began the day early and was fishing, "from the crack of dawn until it got dark."

"Catching a fish this size was pretty exhausting," added Ellinger. "We didn't know what we hooked until we got it on the boat."

The new record exceeded the previous record Pacific bluefin tuna weight by 2.71 pounds. That record was held by Patrick Fagan on a fish caught 35 miles offshore from Westport in 2012.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Viewing Fishing Reports 11-20 (23 reports)

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For fishing pictures go to LewisRiver.com monthy fishing pictures.
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Call 1.800.547.1501 for updated reservoir levels and estimated river flow below Merwin.
For N. F . Lewis River flow go to River Flows At Ariel.
For East Fork Lewis River flow go to East Fork Lewis River Near Heisson, Wa.

Stream flow and reservoir levels at:
Lewis River at Woodland       Speelyai Creek      Muddy Creek
Lewis River at Ariel      Lewis River Reservoir Levels

We are very pleased to offer you this fishing report site. Please only post reports or information that is of interest to all. Many people want a fast report and don't have time to read a lot of other stuff. Inappropriate posts will be deleted. Thanks, Noel Johnson.

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