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Viewing Fishing Reports 11-20 (49 reports)

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Smelt - 5:35 a.m. 3/11/2015
Headed to the Sandy river last Saturday hoping for
some smelt. Dick's Sporting goods and Fisherman's
Marine both said they were in thick. Not a fish in
sight for any of the 1000's that showed up. Not
that familiar with smelt. Do they come back up ?
All the dead ones meant they were there but will
they come back or is it a one way trip ?

Bobberdogger - BG

Fishing Derby - 4:12 p.m. 3/9/2015
Harpers Tackle & Outdoor Located just East of the Arco Station
Hours: 6am to 6pm Mon-Sat and 6am-4pm Sunday. We are sponsoring the fishing deby. Call or stop by for rules

Click above to go to local fishing reports and photos.
Owners
James & Janet Harper
267 Millard St
Woodland, WA 98674
360.841.8292

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Where's a good bobber hole? - 3:47 p.m. 3/9/2015
Where is a good salmon/steelhead
boober fishing hole? Near
lewis,cowlitz,and kalama?

Charles - Vancouver, WA
Thao

contest - 8:31 p.m. 3/8/2015
Where do u bring ur salmon into for the Salmon Derby Contest? or am I not seeing it?

Rob - Vanc

good luck fish hatchery - 4:54 p.m. 3/4/2015
went salmon trolling today between warrior rock and saint hellens. seen atleast 50 sea lions at the mouth of the lewis river. so good luck on the hatchery getting the spring Chinook that they need.

pirate eddie - battleground wa
haskinsbe@comcast.net

WDFW short of spring chinook smolts on the Lewis River Print Email 15 hours ago • By Allen Thomas / The Columbian (Vancouver)(0) Comments ARIEL, Wash. — The state Department of Fish and Wildlife expects to be short about 55,000 young spring chinook for release in the North Fork of the Lewis River this fall and next spring. That prompts the question: Should the shortage be in the lower Lewis River downstream of Merwin Dam or in the reintroduction program upstream of Swift Reservoir? Eric Kinne, hatchery reform coordinator for the agency in Southwest Washington, told the Lewis River Aquatic Coordination Committee recently, the hatcheries on the North Fork need 1,350 spring chinook spawners to produce 1.25 million young salmon for release below Merwin and 100,000 for upstream of Swift. But in 2014, the adult return to the North Fork of the Lewis was only 1,112 spring chinook. PacificCorp’s 50-year federal license to operate the three Lewis River dams calls for reintroduction of spring chinook upstream of Swift Dam. The Aquatic Coordination Committee is a monthly meeting of PacifiCorp, state and federal fishery agencies, the Forest Service, Cowlitz PUD, Indian tribes and others. If 1.1 million young spring chinook from the 2014 adults are released below Merwin as tentatively planned in October, and 150,000 more in the spring of 2016, then only 45,000 remain for release upstream of Swift in the spring of 2016. “Do we short the upper or lower river?’’ Kinne asked the committee. Spring chinook released upstream of Swift Dam acclimate in the upper watershed, then are collected during their downstream migration by a facility at the dam and trucked to a release point in Woodland. The $65-million collector at Swift Dam began operation in December of 2012. However, 2013 proved to be a rocky year for the Swift fish collection facility. A storm tore holes in sections of the net near Swift Dam that help guide the young fish to the collector. Kinne noted that 100,000 spring chinook smolts were planted upstream of Swift in 2014 and only 2,200 were captured at the dam and released in the lower North Fork of the Lewis. Given those numbers, Kinne asked if it makes most sense to short the upper river. Frank Shrier, principal scientist for PacifiCorp, said repairs to the net are complete. The numbers of spring chinook captured migrating out this year will provide more insight into the progress of the reintroduction effort, he added. Kinne said a decision is needed before October on how to distribute the young from 2014 spawners. The fish would return as adults in 2018 and 2019. Spring chinook are struggling in the North Fork of the Lewis River. Another weak return is forecast for 2015, with only 1,100 adults anticipated back. “We need to increase this population,’’ Kinne said. “We’re shutting down fisheries and still not making brood.’’ Temperatures in the North Fork of the Lewis River are not typical of a spring chinook stream due to the three reservoirs upstream of the hatcheries, he said. Water temperatures in the 60s in October and November cause spring chinook to smolt early and want to head to the ocean. Smolting is the physiological process that makes anadromous fish capable of adapting to saltwater. Kinne said the department tried releasing a portion of its spring chinook in fall of 2014 instead of waiting until this spring. “The fall release this year was the best-looking fish that went out of the Lewis in a long time,’’ he said. The Aquatic Coordination Committee made no recommendation on how to split the releases this fall and next spring. The group is expected to visit the topic again in August. Copyright 2015 Longview Daily News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. - 8:42 a.m. 3/3/2015
WDFW short of spring chinook smolts
on the Lewis River

Print Email
15 hours ago • By Allen Thomas /
The Columbian (Vancouver)(0)
Comments
ARIEL, Wash. — The state Department
of Fish and Wildlife expects to be
short about 55,000 young spring
chinook for release in the North
Fork of the Lewis River this fall
and next spring.

That prompts the question: Should
the shortage be in the lower Lewis
River downstream of Merwin Dam or
in the reintroduction program
upstream of Swift Reservoir?

Eric Kinne, hatchery reform
coordinator for the agency in
Southwest Washington, told the
Lewis River Aquatic Coordination
Committee recently, the hatcheries
on the North Fork need 1,350 spring
chinook spawners to produce 1.25
million young salmon for release
below Merwin and 100,000 for
upstream of Swift.

But in 2014, the adult return to
the North Fork of the Lewis was
only 1,112 spring chinook.

PacificCorp’s 50-year federal
license to operate the three Lewis
River dams calls for reintroduction
of spring chinook upstream of Swift
Dam. The Aquatic Coordination
Committee is a monthly meeting of
PacifiCorp, state and federal
fishery agencies, the Forest
Service, Cowlitz PUD, Indian tribes
and others.

If 1.1 million young spring chinook
from the 2014 adults are released
below Merwin as tentatively planned
in October, and 150,000 more in the
spring of 2016, then only 45,000
remain for release upstream of
Swift in the spring of 2016.

“Do we short the upper or lower
river?’’ Kinne asked the committee.

Spring chinook released upstream of
Swift Dam acclimate in the upper
watershed, then are collected
during their downstream migration
by a facility at the dam and
trucked to a release point in
Woodland.

The $65-million collector at Swift
Dam began operation in December of
2012.

However, 2013 proved to be a rocky
year for the Swift fish collection
facility.

A storm tore holes in sections of
the net near Swift Dam that help
guide the young fish to the
collector.

Kinne noted that 100,000 spring
chinook smolts were planted
upstream of Swift in 2014 and only
2,200 were captured at the dam and
released in the lower North Fork of
the Lewis.

Given those numbers, Kinne asked if
it makes most sense to short the
upper river.

Frank Shrier, principal scientist
for PacifiCorp, said repairs to the
net are complete. The numbers of
spring chinook captured migrating
out this year will provide more
insight into the progress of the
reintroduction effort, he added.

Kinne said a decision is needed
before October on how to distribute
the young from 2014 spawners. The
fish would return as adults in 2018
and 2019.

Spring chinook are struggling in
the North Fork of the Lewis River.
Another weak return is forecast for
2015, with only 1,100 adults
anticipated back.

“We need to increase this
population,’’ Kinne said. “We’re
shutting down fisheries and still
not making brood.’’

Temperatures in the North Fork of
the Lewis River are not typical of
a spring chinook stream due to the
three reservoirs upstream of the
hatcheries, he said.

Water temperatures in the 60s in
October and November cause spring
chinook to smolt early and want to
head to the ocean. Smolting is the
physiological process that makes
anadromous fish capable of adapting
to saltwater.

Kinne said the department tried
releasing a portion of its spring
chinook in fall of 2014 instead of
waiting until this spring.

“The fall release this year was the
best-looking fish that went out of
the Lewis in a long time,’’ he
said.

The Aquatic Coordination Committee
made no recommendation on how to
split the releases this fall and
next spring. The group is expected
to visit the topic again in August.

Copyright 2015 Longview Daily News.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisreiver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Strong runs of Columbia River chinook, Puget Sound pink and coho salmon projected OLYMPIA – Fishing prospects look promising for chinook in Washington’s ocean waters and the Columbia River, as well as for coho and pink salmon in areas of Puget Sound, according to state fisheries managers. The forecasts – developed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and treaty Indian tribes – for chinook, coho, sockeye, chum and pink salmon were released at a public meeting in Olympia today. The forecasts mark the starting point for developing the 2015 salmon fishing seasons. The public is encouraged to participate throughout the process by attending various meetings and by using a new online commenting tool, said Ron Warren, fisheries policy lead for WDFW. The commenting tool, a meeting schedule, salmon forecasts and information about the salmon season-setting process are available on WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalcon/ . Over the next several weeks, state and tribal co-managers will develop seasons that focus fishing opportunities on abundant hatchery and wild salmon populations, Warren said. “Ensuring we meet our conservation objectives for depressed wild salmon stocks is the first step in establishing these fisheries,” Warren said. “That is always a challenge, but several of this year’s forecasts suggest we can provide some potentially great fisheries while meeting these goals.” As in past years, salmon-fishing prospects in 2015 vary by area: Columbia River: About 900,000 fall chinook are expected to return to the Columbia River in 2015. That would be the third largest run on record since 1938, said Ron Roler, Columbia River policy coordinator for WDFW. Roughly 70 percent of the chinook anticipated this year – or about 626,000 salmon – is expected to be “upriver brights” headed for areas above Bonneville Dam. The ocean abundance of Columbia River coho this year is expected to be nearly 777,000 fish, down from 964,000 in 2014. Washington’s ocean waters: About 255,000 hatchery chinook are expected to return this year to the lower Columbia River. Those salmon, which are known as “tules,” are the backbone of the recreational ocean chinook fishery. The forecast for returning coho also is strong though down somewhat from last year, said Doug Milward, ocean salmon fishery manager for WDFW. “Coho numbers are down about 20 percent from 2014, but the forecast for lower river chinook is up slightly from last year,” Milward said. “Overall, anglers can look forward to more great fishing opportunities in the ocean this summer.” Puget Sound: Another solid run of coho is expected to return to Puget Sound’s rivers this year. More than 891,000 coho, up 20,000 from last year, are forecast to return to Puget Sound. Central and south Sound are anticipated to be bright spots for coho, said Ryan Lothrop, Puget Sound recreational fishery manager for WDFW. The forecast for summer/fall chinook is down somewhat from last year with about 208,000 chinook returning, Lothrop said. Hatchery chinook make up the bulk of returning fish. More than 6.5 million pink salmon are expected to return to the Sound this year, which is comparable to the number that returned in 2013. Most pink salmon return to Washington’s waters only in odd-numbered years. “A large return of pink salmon provides another reason for anglers to get out on the water and, perhaps, bring someone new to the sport along with them,” Lothrop said. Meanwhile, the forecast of 165,000 sockeye still falls short of the 350,000 minimum needed to consider a recreational sockeye fishery for Lake Washington. Fishery managers, however, will consider sockeye fisheries in Baker Lake and the Skagit River, Lothrop said. - 2:08 p.m. 3/2/2015
Strong runs of Columbia River
chinook,
Puget Sound pink and coho salmon
projected

OLYMPIA – Fishing prospects look
promising for chinook in
Washington’s ocean waters and the
Columbia River, as well as for coho
and pink salmon in areas of Puget
Sound, according to state fisheries
managers.

The forecasts – developed by the
Washington Department of Fish and
Wildlife (WDFW) and treaty Indian
tribes – for chinook, coho,
sockeye, chum and pink salmon were
released at a public meeting in
Olympia today.

The forecasts mark the starting
point for developing the 2015
salmon fishing seasons. The public
is encouraged to participate
throughout the process by attending
various meetings and by using a new
online commenting tool, said Ron
Warren, fisheries policy lead for
WDFW.

The commenting tool, a meeting
schedule, salmon forecasts and
information about the salmon
season-setting process are
available on WDFW’s website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfal
con/ .

Over the next several weeks, state
and tribal co-managers will develop
seasons that focus fishing
opportunities on abundant hatchery
and wild salmon populations, Warren
said.

“Ensuring we meet our conservation
objectives for depressed wild
salmon stocks is the first step in
establishing these fisheries,”
Warren said. “That is always a
challenge, but several of this
year’s forecasts suggest we can
provide some potentially great
fisheries while meeting these
goals.”

As in past years, salmon-fishing
prospects in 2015 vary by area:

Columbia River: About 900,000 fall
chinook are expected to return to
the Columbia River in 2015. That
would be the third largest run on
record since 1938, said Ron Roler,
Columbia River policy coordinator
for WDFW.
Roughly 70 percent of the chinook
anticipated this year – or about
626,000 salmon – is expected to be
“upriver brights” headed for areas
above Bonneville Dam.
The ocean abundance of Columbia
River coho this year is expected to
be nearly 777,000 fish, down from
964,000 in 2014.

Washington’s ocean waters: About
255,000 hatchery chinook are
expected to return this year to the
lower Columbia River. Those salmon,
which are known as “tules,” are the
backbone of the recreational ocean
chinook fishery.
The forecast for returning coho
also is strong though down somewhat
from last year, said Doug Milward,
ocean salmon fishery manager for
WDFW.
“Coho numbers are down about 20
percent from 2014, but the forecast
for lower river chinook is up
slightly from last year,” Milward
said. “Overall, anglers can look
forward to more great fishing
opportunities in the ocean this
summer.”

Puget Sound: Another solid run of
coho is expected to return to Puget
Sound’s rivers this year. More than
891,000 coho, up 20,000 from last
year, are forecast to return to
Puget Sound.
Central and south Sound are
anticipated to be bright spots for
coho, said Ryan Lothrop, Puget
Sound recreational fishery manager
for WDFW.
The forecast for summer/fall
chinook is down somewhat from last
year with about 208,000 chinook
returning, Lothrop said. Hatchery
chinook make up the bulk of
returning fish.
More than 6.5 million pink salmon
are expected to return to the Sound
this year, which is comparable to
the number that returned in 2013.
Most pink salmon return to
Washington’s waters only in odd-
numbered years.
“A large return of pink salmon
provides another reason for anglers
to get out on the water and,
perhaps, bring someone new to the
sport along with them,” Lothrop
said.
Meanwhile, the forecast of
165,000 sockeye still falls short
of the 350,000 minimum needed to
consider a recreational sockeye
fishery for Lake Washington.
Fishery managers, however, will
consider sockeye fisheries in Baker
Lake and the Skagit River, Lothrop
said.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisreiver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Southwest Washington - 4:51 p.m. 2/27/2015
Southwest Washington
(Clark, Cowlitz, Klickitat, Lewis, Skamania and Wahkiakum counties)

Fishing: Steelhead fishing is heating up on the Cowlitz and Kalama rivers, kokanee are biting at Merwin Reservoir, and five area lakes are set to receive thousands of rainbow trout this month. Starting March 2, sturgeon fishing is limited to catch-and-release in the Bonneville Pool, but anglers can keep one legal-size fish per day in The Dalles and John Day pools until annual harvest guidelines have been met.

Even so, the main attraction this month is the spring chinook fishery in the lower Columbia River, the first major salmon fishery of 2015. Anglers have already reeled in several nice springers, but the real action begins later in March.

Based on pre-season projections, 312,600 adult spring chinook are expected to return to the big river this year, including 232,500 upriver fish bound for rivers and streams above Bonneville Dam. The forecast for upriver chinook is just shy of last year’s return of 242,600 upriver fish.

“The stage is set for another great spring chinook fishery this year,” said Ron Roler, Columbia River policy manager for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). “Not only is the run forecast well above average, but water conditions also appear to be favorable for the upcoming season.”

Initial seasons set by fishery managers from Washington and Oregon are as follows:


•Below Bonneville Dam: Open from March 1 through April 10 to boat and bank fishing from Buoy 10 upstream to Beacon Rock. Bank fishing will also be allowed from Beacon Rock upriver to the fishing boundary just below the dam. The sport fishery will be closed March 24, March 31, and April 7 (Tuesdays) to allow for potential commercial fisheries. The adult daily catch limit is two hatchery salmon or steelhead in combination, of which no more than one may be a chinook. •Above Bonneville Dam: Open daily from March 16 through May 6 to boat and bank anglers between the Tower Island powerlines (six miles below The Dalles Dam) and the Washington/Oregon state line, 17 miles above McNary Dam. Bank anglers can also fish from Bonneville Dam upriver to the Tower Island powerlines during that time. As below the dam, the adult daily catch limit will be two hatchery salmon or steelhead in combination, of which no more than one may be a chinook.
Anglers are required to use barbless hooks in both areas, and release any salmon or steelhead not visibly marked as a hatchery fish by a clipped adipose fin.

Under this year’s initial catch guidelines, anglers fishing below the dam will be allowed to catch up to 11,500 spring chinook before an updated run forecast is released in late April or early May. Another 1,200 adult upriver chinook will be reserved for anglers fishing between Bonneville Dam and the Washington/Oregon state line.

To guard against overestimating this year’s run, the states will again manage the fisheries with a 30 percent buffer until the forecast is updated with information about actual returns.

Several tributaries will also be open to fishing for hatchery spring chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead in March. A strong return of 11,200 spring chinook is expected this year to the Cowlitz River, which is currently open with an adult daily catch limit of two hatchery salmon. Late stock winter hatchery steelhead have also been biting anglers’ hooks on the Cowlitz.

On the Kalama River, anglers can catch one adult hatchery salmon per day, along with hatchery steelhead. Returns of late stock winter hatchery steelhead have been good so far – so good that the daily limit on the lower Kalama will increase to three fish starting March 1.

Wind River and Drano Lake open for salmon fishing March 16, with a daily limit two hatchery chinook, or two hatchery steelhead, or one of each.

In anticipation of low returns, the mainstem Lewis and North Fork Lewis rivers are closed to spring chinook fishing under an emergency rule, although both remain open to fishing for hatchery steelhead.

In addition, anglers should be aware that March 15 is the last day to fish for steelhead on Abernathy, Cedar (Clark Co.), Germany, Mill (Cowlitz Co.), Rock (Skamania Co.), and Salmon (Clark Co.) creeks and on the Coweeman, Elochoman, Grays, East Fork Lewis, South Fork Toutle, and Washougal rivers

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Plenty of good reasons to renew - 4:45 p.m. 2/27/2015
Plenty of good reasons to renew
fishing and hunting licenses soon

Spring chinook salmon are moving into the lower Columbia River, several eastside lakes open for trout fishing March 1, and razor clam digs are scheduled this month – including the first dig of the season on morning tides.

These fisheries are just the first of many set to open in the weeks ahead, and the year’s first hunting seasons aren’t far behind. A spring wild turkey season for hunters under age 16 is scheduled April 4-5 prior to the start of the general spring turkey hunt April 15.

With a new season of outdoor adventures about to begin, Washingtonians might want to consider purchasing 2015-16 fishing and hunting licenses before current licenses expire at midnight March 31.

“We encourage people to renew their fishing and hunting licenses early, so they can take advantage of all the great recreational opportunities available throughout the year,” said Joe Stohr, deputy director of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).

The cost of fishing and hunting licenses currently remain the same as last year. All fees included, a resident adult freshwater fishing license is $29.50; saltwater is $30.05; and a combination license is $54.25. Resident hunting licenses vary with package options, ranging from a small-game license at $40.50 to a deer/elk/cougar/bear combination license for $95.50.

Most annual licenses include a WDFW vehicle access pass, which gives people access to more than 700 WDFW water access sites throughout the state. Or, for $35, individuals can purchase an annual Discover Pass, which also provides vehicle access to state parks and other state lands.

Fishing licenses, hunting licenses and the Discover Pass are all available online ( https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov/ ), by phone (1-866-246-9453) and from license dealers around the state.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

report - 5:21 p.m. 2/26/2015
This is a great web site I check every day
and am surprized everyday I check and
theres no reports. Is the fact that theres no
reports mean no ones fishing or theres
nothing to report? Sometimes theres a
smart ass reply that the report doesnt have
anythi g to do with the lewis, but I have to
say somethings better than nothing and if
and when I get a chance to fish it I promise
ill report! Thanks sorry for the rant

Garry - Battleground wa
Lachlinsway@gmail.com

Viewing Fishing Reports 11-20 (49 reports)

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For fishing pictures go to LewisRiver.com monthy fishing pictures.
For more information go to Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Call 1.800.547.1501 for updated reservoir levels and estimated river flow below Merwin.
For N. F . Lewis River flow go to River Flows At Ariel.
For East Fork Lewis River flow go to East Fork Lewis River Near Heisson, Wa.

Stream flow and reservoir levels at:
Lewis River at Woodland       Speelyai Creek      Muddy Creek
Lewis River at Ariel      Lewis River Reservoir Levels

We are very pleased to offer you this fishing report site. Please only post reports or information that is of interest to all. Many people want a fast report and don't have time to read a lot of other stuff. Inappropriate posts will be deleted. Thanks, Noel Johnson.

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