LewisRiver.com Fishing Reports

Click here to buy a Washington Fishing Licence


Click here for high water information.

Scroll down to fishing reports.

Click here for Gone Catchin Guide Service.
Click above for Gone Catchin Guide Service.

Click here for Lewis River RV Park and Country Store.
Click above for Lewis River RV Park and Country Store.

Click here to go to Harpers Tackle & Outdoor.
Click above to go to Harpers Tackle & Outdoor.

Click here to go to Gilliano's Pizza and Ice Cream Parlor.
Click above to go to page with $3.00 off coupon.

Take a safe boating course and get your Washington boat license to increase your fishing success.

Phone number to report snaggers Toll-Free at 1-877-933-9847. More info, click here.

Click here for information on when runs of fish enter the North Fork Lewis.

Click here for current fish counts over the Columbia River dams.

River Access Below Merwin Dam

You are currently viewing the Fishing Reports
[ Submit a Report ]

Viewing Fishing Reports 11-20 (29 reports)

Previous Page        Page # 1 2 3         Next Page

Washington's salmon fisheries set for 2015 - 5:03 p.m. 4/15/2015
Washington's salmon fisheries set for 2015

ROHNERT PARK, CALIF. – State and tribal co-managers today agreed on a package of salmon fisheries that meets conservation goals for wild salmon populations and provides fishing opportunities on healthy stocks.

Washington's 2015 salmon fishing seasons, developed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and treaty tribal co-managers, were finalized during the Pacific Fishery Management Council's (PFMC) meeting in Rohnert Park, Calif. The regulations cover salmon fisheries in Puget Sound, Washington's ocean and coastal areas, and the Columbia River.

The first priority for state and tribal fishery managers was to develop a package of salmon fisheries that is consistent with ongoing efforts to protect and rebuild wild salmon stocks, said Ron Warren, fisheries policy lead for WDFW.

While state and tribal fishers will have a variety of salmon-fishing opportunities this year, many fisheries will be constrained to protect wild salmon listed under the federal Endangered Species Act, he said.

“With about 25 percent fewer wild chinook expected back to Puget Sound this year, we had to make several difficult decisions in order to meet conservation goals for wild salmon,” Warren said. “Despite those necessary changes, anglers will still have a number of good opportunities to fish for salmon this year in Washington.”

As in past years, recreational salmon fisheries will vary by area:

Washington's ocean waters: The PFMC approved a recreational chinook catch quota of 64,000 fish, which is an increase of 4,900 fish from 2014's quota. The PFMC, which establishes fishing seasons in ocean waters three to 200 miles off the Pacific coast, also adopted a quota of 150,800 coho for this year's recreational ocean fishery – about 34,000 fish fewer than last year's quota.

Mark-selective fisheries for hatchery chinook will begin in ocean areas on various dates in May.

The recreational salmon fishing season in marine areas 3 (La Push) and 4 (Neah Bay) will begin with two short openings May 15-16 and May 22-23 for hatchery chinook. The mark-selective fishery for hatchery chinook in those two marine areas will then reopen May 30 and run seven days a week through June 12.
Mark-selective fisheries for hatchery chinook will be open daily May 30 through June 12 in Marine Area 2 (Westport/Ocean Shores) and Marine Area 1 (Ilwaco).
In all areas, anglers will have a daily limit of two salmon, but must release coho and wild chinook. The fisheries could close earlier if a coastwide quota of 10,000 hatchery chinook is reached.
Recreational ocean salmon fisheries for chinook and hatchery coho will be open daily beginning June 13 in marine areas 1-4. Anglers will have a daily limit of two salmon, plus two additional pink salmon in marine areas 3 and 4. Those fishing marine areas 1 and 2 also will have a two-salmon daily limit, but can keep only one chinook per day. All four marine areas will close Sept. 30. The La Push late-season area of Marine Area 3 will reopen Oct. 1-11.

Columbia River: The Buoy 10 salmon fishery will be open from Aug. 1 through Dec. 31. The fishery will be open for chinook and hatchery coho Aug. 1 through Sept. 7 (Labor Day) with a daily limit of two salmon, only one of which can be chinook.

From Sept. 8 through Sept. 30, anglers will have a daily limit of two hatchery coho, but must release chinook. From Oct. 1 through Dec. 31, the fishery will be open for chinook and hatchery coho, with a daily limit of two adult salmon. During the season, fishery managers will assess the catch and may make changes to chinook retention.

For the second-straight year, during fall fisheries, anglers fishing from the same boat may continue fishing for salmon until all anglers have reached their daily limits in the following areas:

The mainstem Columbia River from the Rocky Point/Tongue Point line upstream to Lewis River will be open for hatchery coho Aug. 1 through Dec. 31. Anglers will be allowed to retain one adult chinook as part of their two-adult daily limit from Aug. 1 through Sept. 14. From Sept. 8 through Sept. 14, adult chinook retention is restricted to hatchery chinook only. From Oct. 1 through Dec. 31, anglers can retain two adult chinook daily.
The Lewis River upstream to Steamboat Landing Park dock/Marker #50, near Washougal, will be open Aug. 1 through Dec. 31 for chinook and hatchery coho, with a daily limit of two adult salmon.
The Steamboat Landing Park dock/Marker #50 upstream to Bonneville Dam will be open Aug. 1 through Dec. 31 for chinook and hatchery coho with a daily limit of three adult salmon, two of which can be hatchery coho.
Bonneville Dam upstream to the Highway 395 Bridge near Pasco will be open Aug. 1 through Dec. 31 with a daily limit of three adult salmon, two of which may be coho. Anglers must release any unmarked coho caught downstream of the Hood River Bridge.
The summer season on the mainstem Columbia River from the Astoria-Megler Bridge upstream to Bonneville Dam will initially be open from June 16 through July 6 for hatchery summer chinook and sockeye. The daily limit will be two adult salmonids (chinook and steelhead must be adipose fin-clipped). All sockeye are considered adults in the daily limit. Staff will monitor the fishery and potentially modify the July portion of the fishery, which may include extending the season or allowing retention of any adult chinook.

The summer season from Bonneville Dam upstream to the Highway 395 Bridge will be open from June 16 through July 31 for hatchery summer chinook and sockeye. The daily limit will be two adult salmonids (chinook and steelhead must be adipose fin-clipped). All sockeye are considered adults in the daily limit.

Puget Sound: Anglers will have an opportunity to take advantage of solid returns of coho, pink and Skagit River sockeye salmon. They will, however, see adjustments to hatchery chinook fisheries, due to an expected weaker return of both wild and hatchery chinook than prior years.

“Fishing for pink salmon should be excellent in Puget Sound, including in Hood Canal and Dungeness Bay,” said Ryan Lothrop, Puget Sound recreational fishery manager for WDFW.

Anglers fishing Marine Area 10 (Seattle/Bremerton) will see the biggest change this season. The area will be closed to chinook retention as part of an effort to rebuild stocks returning to Lake Washington. However, Marine Area 10 will still be open for coho and pink salmon retention.

Neighboring Marine Area 9 (Admiralty Inlet) will be open the same dates as last year, with anglers allowed to retain hatchery chinook from July 16 through Aug. 15. However, the area could close sooner if the quota of 2,483 fish is met.

A portion of the estimated 14 million pink salmon returning to Canada's Fraser River will make their way to the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the waters of the San Juan Islands. Another roughly 6.5 million pink salmon will return to Puget Sound. Anglers fishing in most marine areas will be allowed to keep two pink salmon in addition to daily catch limits for other salmon during July through September.

Meanwhile, the forecast for sockeye returning to Baker Lake is strong enough to allow for both a lake fishery, open mid-July through early September, and a fishery on the Skagit River, which will be open June 16 through July 15 with a quota.

Other changes to this year’s Puget Sound marine area and freshwater fisheries include:

Marine Area 7 (San Juan Islands) will remain a non mark-selective fishery for the month of July, when anglers can keep one chinook per day with a two fish limit, plus two additional pink salmon. Also in July, the southern Rosario strait/eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca will be closed for salmon.
The Dungeness Bay section of Marine Area 6 (Port Angeles) will be open July 16 through Aug. 15 for pink salmon fishing only with gear restrictions. Anglers can keep four pink salmon daily.
Elliott Bay will be open for pink and coho retention Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays starting Aug. 14.
Marine Area 12 (Hood Canal) north of Ayock Point will be open to coho and pink salmon fishing starting in July with gear restrictions for that month only.
The mark-selective fishery for hatchery chinook on the Skykomish River is not scheduled to open this year. However, the fishery could open (by emergency rule) if broodstock goals are met.
Anglers on the Skokomish River should be aware of a new “bobber only” section of the river, from the Highway 106 Bridge to Highway 101. Upstream of Highway 106 will be open in late July for “bobber only” fishing. Additionally, the free-flowing freshwaters near the mouth of the river (below the Tacoma Powerlines) will be closed this year.
Tahuya River is closed to coho fishing due to several issues including trespassing, littering, and snagging.
Anglers fishing in Marine Area 5 will be able to retain wild coho for eight days in September, in addition to the entire month of October. Marine Area 7 also will be open for wild coho retention in October.
Puyallup River will have closures similar to last year, while the Nisqually River will have additional closures.
Lake Sammamish will be closed to salmon fishing this year.
Specific fishing seasons and regulations for marine areas in Washington and a portion of the Columbia River will be posted on WDFW's North of Falcon website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalcon/ within a few weeks.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Columbia Park Pond to close - 5:40 p.m. 4/14/2015
Columbia Park Pond to close
for kids' fishing day events

Action: Close Columbia Park Pond to all fishing except youth registered for the "Special Needs Fishing Event" on Friday, May 8, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.; or the "Kids' Fishing Day" event on Saturday, May 9, at 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. In addition, the daily limit is reduced to three trout during the events.

Effective dates: 12:01 a.m. May 6 through 3 p.m. May 9, 2015.

Species affected: All game fish.

Location: Columbia Park Pond located within Columbia Park in Kennewick.

Reasons for action: This rule change is necessary to assure safe and successful fishing events. Several thousand rainbow trout will be stocked up to three days prior to the events to ensure they will bite while the kids are fishing. During the two events, only those registered will be allowed to fish.

Other information: The kids' fishing events have been held at Columbia Park Pond for the past 14 years. The events this year will bring out more than 1,400 registered anglers to introduce them to the fun of fishing.

The pond re-opens to the public on Saturday, May 9 at 3:01 p.m. Columbia Park Pond is only open to fishing by juvenile anglers (under 15 years old) and adults with a disability who have a designated harvester companion card.

Information contact: Paul Hoffarth, WDFW District 4 Biologist, (509-545-2284).

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Snake River spring chinook fishery - 4:44 p.m. 4/10/2015
Snake River spring chinook fishery
will get under way Sunday, April 19

OLYMPIA – Two sections of the Snake River, below Ice Harbor Dam near Pasco and below Lower Granite Dam, will open to fishing for spring chinook salmon Sunday, April 19. Two other sections of the river – below Little Goose Dam and Clarkston – will open Thursday, April 23.

Each section of the river is scheduled to be open three days per week. Waters below Ice Harbor Dam and below Lower Granite Dam are scheduled to be open Sunday through Tuesday each week, while the Little Goose Dam and Clarkston area sections will be open Thursday through Saturday each week.

All four sections will remain open until further notice.

Jeremy Trump, district fish biologist for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), said the fishery will likely remain open from four to six weeks.

“We have a strong run-size forecast for Columbia River spring chinook this year, so we will likely be able to sustain fishing into late May,” Trump said.

The fishery will close when the Snake River harvest allocation is met or allowable impacts on wild stocks reach federal limits, he said.

The Columbia River forecast for 2015 totals 232,500 adult upriver spring chinook, including 140,800 Snake River fish, of which 95,500 are hatchery fish. By comparison, last year’s forecast anticipated a return of 125,000 Snake River spring chinook, with 82,800 hatchery fish.

The daily catch limit for open areas is six hatchery chinook – marked by a clipped adipose fin – of which no more than one may be an adult chinook salmon. Jacks are less than 24 inches long, and any chinook salmon measuring less than 12 inches must be released.

During these fisheries, possession limits will be increased to allow three daily limits of spring chinook salmon in fresh form.

In all areas, anglers are required to use barbless hooks, and must stop fishing for the day when they reach their daily limit of adult hatchery chinook salmon. All chinook with an adipose fin, and all steelhead, must immediately be released unharmed.

“Our ability to closely monitor this fishery, as required by federal permit, is due in large part to funds from the Columbia River Salmon/Steelhead Endorsement,” said Trump. “Without the monitoring, we wouldn’t be able to open this fishery.”

The endorsement, required of all anglers fishing for salmon or steelhead in the Columbia River system (which includes the Snake River), costs $8.75; seniors and youth pay $7.10.

The sections of the Snake River scheduled to open April 19 are:

Below Ice Harbor: Snake River from the South Bound Highway 12 Bridge near Pasco upstream about 7 miles to the fishing restriction boundary below Ice Harbor Dam.
Below Lower Granite Dam: Snake River from the south shore boat launch (Ilia Boat Launch) across to the mouth of Almota Creek upstream about four miles to the restricted fishing area below Lower Granite Dam.
The sections of the Snake River scheduled to open April 23 are:

Below Little Goose: Snake River from Texas Rapids boat launch (south side of the river upstream from the mouth of the Tucannon River) to the fishing restriction boundary below Little Goose Dam. This zone includes the rock and concrete area between the juvenile bypass return pipe and Little Goose Dam along the south shoreline of the facility (includes the walkway area locally known as “the Wall” in front of the juvenile collection facility).
Clarkston: Snake River from the downstream edge of the large power lines crossing the Snake River (just upstream from West Evans Road on the south shore) upstream about 3.5 miles to the Washington state line (from the east levee of the Greenbelt boat launch in Clarkston northwest across the Snake River to the Washington/Idaho boundary waters marker on the Whitman County shore).
Trump strongly encourages anglers to review the spring chinook fishing rule change, posted on WDFW’s website at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/

General fishing regulations for the Snake River, in effective through June 30, are available in the Fishing in Washington rule pamphlet ( http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/ ).

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Southwest Washington - 5:44 p.m. 3/31/2015
Southwest Washington
(Clark, Cowlitz, Klickitat, Lewis, Skamania and Wahkiakum counties)

Fishing: The spring chinook fishery got off to a fast start this year, drawing a strong showing of anglers to the lower Columbia River by late March. As of March 22, anglers had made twice as many fishing trips to the area and caught nine times as many spring chinook as they did during the same period last year.

“The fishery is clearly off and running,” said Ron Roler, Columbia River policy coordinator for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). “Water conditions have been great, the weather’s been terrific and a lot of anglers are turning out for this year’s fishery.”

In addition, trout fishing opens April 25 on several popular lakes and anglers can catch hatchery steelhead, sturgeon, and walleye in various waters all month long.

Anglers age 15 and older are required to have a valid 2015-16 fishing license to participate all of these fisheries after March 31, when 2014-15 licenses expire. Licenses are avaiIable online, by phone (1-866-246-9453), and from sporting goods stores and other retail license dealers around the state.

Based on pre-season projections, 312,600 adult spring chinook salmon are expected to return to the big river this year, including 232,500 upriver fish bound for rivers and streams above Bonneville Dam.

The initial spring chinook season for the lower Columbia River is scheduled to run through April 10 from Buoy 10 upstream to Beacon Rock (except April 7, when the season closes for a possible one-day commercial fishery). Bank fishing is also allowed farther upriver to the fishing boundary just below Bonneville Dam.

State fishery managers from Washington and Oregon have scheduled a joint meeting April 8 to assess the catch-to-date, and determine whether they can add additional fishing days before the pre-season run forecast is updated in late April or early May.

That decision will be announced here, on WDFW’s main webpage, on the department’s Fishing Hotline (360-902-2500), and in a news release to statewide news media.

Upriver from Bonneville Dam, the initial spring chinook fishery is scheduled to continue through May 6 from the Tower Island powerlines to the Washington/Oregon state line, 17 miles above McNary Dam. During that time, bank anglers can also fish from Bonneville Dam upriver to the powerlines, six miles below The Dalles Dam.

In all areas of the mainstem Columbia River downriver from the state line, the daily catch limit for adult fish is two hatchery salmon or steelhead in combination, of which no more than one may be a chinook. Anglers are required to use barbless hooks and release any salmon or steelhead not visibly marked as a hatchery fish by a clipped adipose fin.

Joe Hymer, a WDFW fish biologist, said the water has been running warmer than usual – about 48 degrees F. – which has put springers on the bite. “Given the water conditions, a lot of anglers are switching out herring for spinners and prawns,” he said.

Under this year’s initial catch guidelines, anglers fishing below the dam will be allowed to catch up to 11,500 spring chinook prior to the run update. Another 1,200 adult upriver chinook are reserved for anglers fishing between Bonneville Dam and the Washington/Oregon state line.

To guard against overestimating this year’s run, the states are again managing the fisheries with a 30 percent buffer until the forecast is updated with information about actual returns.

Meanwhile, sleek springers will continue moving into area tributaries, some of which also offer great fishing for hatchery steelhead.

Starting April 1, anglers fishing the Cowlitz River can catch and keep two hatchery adult chinook salmon plus three hatchery steelhead per day, as described in the rule change. On the Kalama River, anglers can retain one hatchery adult chinook plus three hatchery steelhead per day under the current fishing rule. The lower Kalama is open for hatchery Chinook through at least April and possibly longer depending on anglers’ success and hatchery returns.

The Lewis River (including the North Fork) remains open for hatchery steelhead, but is closed for spring chinook fishing until further notice. In addition, the North Fork Lewis from Johnson Creek (located below the salmon hatchery) upstream to Merwin Dam is slated to be closed to all fishing in the month of May.

Anglers planning to fish the Wind River, Drano Lake, or the Klickitat River should check the 2014-15 Sport Fishing Rules for salmon and steelhead openings and regulation changes in April.

Rather catch sturgeon? Currently, anglers must release any sturgeon they catch in the Bonneville Pool, but, fishery managers will meet in April to set dates for the summer retention season. Until then, anglers can still catch and keep one legal-size white sturgeon per day in The Dalles and John Day pools. Legal fish measure 43 inches to 54 inches, fork-length. Walleye fishing has been good in The Dalles and John Day pools, and bass should start biting there and in Bonneville Pool as the water warms up.

Another option is trout fishing, which hits full throttle April 25 when several hundred lowland lakes throughout the state open for business.

While most lakes in southwest Washington are open year-round, “opening day” marks the opening of such perennial favorites as Mineral Lake, Fort Borst Park Pond, Carlisle Lake, Davis Lake, and Plummer Lake in Lewis County; Kidney Lake in Skamania County; and the Rowland Lakes, Spearfish and Horsethief Lakes in Klickitat County.

As noted in last year’s Sport Fishing Rules, Swift Reservoir will not open until the first Saturday in June to protect salmon and steelhead smolts migrating downstream. Those smolts are part of an ongoing reintroduction program under re-licensing agreements with PacifiCorp.

In other waters, WDFW will continue to plant thousands of catchable trout in Clark County lakes, including Klineline Pond, Battleground Lake and Lacamas Lake. Three lakes in Cowlitz County – Sacajawea, Kress, and Horseshoe lakes – will receive plants of rainbow trout, as will three lakes in Skamania County – Icehouse, Little Ash, and Tunnel lakes. Swift Power Canal also will be planted prior to the April 25 opener.

To accommodate a fishing event for kids, Klineline Park in Vancouver will be closed to the general public from April 9-11. More information is available on WDFW’s website.

Hunting: The spring wild turkey season runs April 15 through May 31 around the state. The general season follows a special hunt April 4-5 for people age 15 and younger. For more information, check out the Wild Turkey Spring Season pamphlet.

As in past years, we are seeing high interest in hunter education around the spring turkey season opener, said Dave Whipple, WDFW hunter education division manager. “We encourage new hunters to enroll in hunter education courses well ahead of their first hunting trip.”

A hunter education course is required for first-time Washington hunters born after Jan. 1, 1972. To find a course and learn about hunter education requirements, new hunters should visit the WDFW hunter education webpage. Those who do not find a course that meets their needs should continue to check the website as classes are added regularly.

Hunter education programs teach safety, conservation ethics and principles of sportsmanship, said Whipple. “This is critical information for a safe and positive hunting experience, and we do not want any new hunter to miss this opportunity,” he said.

Wildlife viewing: Each year since 2002, dozens of California sea lions have travelled 145 miles up the Columbia River to feed on spring chinook salmon preparing to move up the fish ladders at Bonneville Dam. Both species will be well represented there this month, but there are better places along the river to see them up close.

According to a recent survey, there are now more than 2,340 California and Steller sea lions packed onto the docks and nearby jetties at the East Mooring Basin in Astoria. Packed cheek by jowl, they will be on display throughout the month, before moving upriver or back to their breeding grounds in the Channel Islands off the California coast. While they are easily seen – and heard – biologists warn spectators not to get too close.

Meanwhile, back at Bonneville Dam, spring chinook and steelhead will be evading sea lions and crowding up the fish ladders in increasing numbers this month. Starting with just a few hundred a day, their numbers will climb into the thousands, passing by the viewing window at the dam.

To observe the annual parade of fish, stop by the Washington Shore Visitor Complex at the dam. To get there, take Washington State Highway 14 east to Milepost 40 (about 5 miles from Stevenson) and turn into the Bonneville Dam visitor center. The visitor center is the glass building at the end of the powerhouse.

For information on state fish managers’ ongoing efforts to reduce sea lion predation on salmon and steelhead at Bonneville Dam, see the department’s website on sea lion management.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

015 halibut seasons provide more - 3:45 p.m. 3/27/2015
015 halibut seasons provide more
fishing options in Columbia River area

OLYMPIA - Anglers can expect halibut fishing seasons this year to be similar to 2014 for the Puget Sound and coastal waters, with some additional fishing opportunities in the Columbia River area.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) sets halibut seasons using catch quotas adopted by the International Pacific Halibut Commission. The recreational catch quota for all of Washington's areas is 214,110 pounds, the same as last year.

WDFW has revised the season structure for the Columbia River fishery to encourage anglers to fish for halibut there, said Heather Reed, WDFW coastal policy coordinator. The season for that area will run continuously instead of being divided between an early and late season.

"We continue to look for ways to increase fishing opportunity in the Columbia River area, where the catch has been below the quota in recent years," Reed said.

Anglers will again be allowed to retain all bottomfish while having halibut onboard their boats in the nearshore section of the Columbia River fishery (Marine Area 1), which opens May 4 on a Monday-through-Wednesday schedule. Additional changes will allow anglers to retain flatfish - in addition to sablefish and Pacific cod - with halibut on board during the all-depth fishery that opens May 1 on a Thursday- through-Sunday schedule.

"In addition to some great halibut fishing, anglers can look forward to more opportunities to target bottomfish in Westport, Neah Bay and La Push," Reed said.

For the first time since 2008, anglers will be allowed to fish for lingcod in the Westport area (south of 46? 58' N. Lat. and seaward of 30 fathoms) on Fridays and Saturdays, from July 1 through Aug. 31.

In addition, anglers fishing in the deep waters off the north coast in Marine areas 3 and 4, west of the Bonilla-Tatoosh line, will have more days to retain bottomfish, including lingcod. Starting this year, the 20 fathom (120 ft.) depth restriction will be in place May 9 through Labor Day, rather than May 1 through Sept. 30.

WDFW considers management measures for coastal sport bottomfish fisheries every two years through the Pacific Fishery Management Council process.

Regulations approved by the council include depth restrictions and area closures designed to reduce encounters with yelloweye and canary rockfish in coastal waters. Anglers are also prohibited from retaining those species - and bocaccio rockfish - in parts of Puget Sound.

Anglers are strongly encouraged to use a descending device to release these rockfish species, as well as other rockfish that anglers don't intend to retain. Information about descending devices can be found on WDFW's webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/bottomfish/rockfish/mortality.html .

In all marine areas open to halibut fishing, there is a one-fish daily catch limit and no minimum size restriction. Anglers may possess a maximum of two fish in any form and must record their catch on a WDFW catch record card.

Changes to the effective date of the WDFW Sport Fishing Pamphlet will mean that the most up-to-date information on recreational halibut and bottomfish seasons and regulations will be found on the WDFW website http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/creel/halibut/ .

2015 Puget Sound halibut seasons

Marine Area 5: The fishery will be open May 15 and 16; Thursday through Sunday of Memorial Day weekend, May 21-24; and May 29 and 30.

Marine Areas 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10: The fishery will be open May 8 and 9; May 15 and 16; Thursday through Sunday of Memorial Day weekend, May 21-24; and May 28-30.

Marine Areas 11, 12, 13: These areas will remain closed to halibut fishing to protect threatened and endangered rockfish species.

2015 Pacific Coast halibut seasons

Marine Area 1 (Columbia River): Marine Area 1 opens May 1, four days per week (Thursday-Sunday) until the subarea quota is taken, or Sept. 30, whichever occurs first. Five hundred pounds of the subarea quota is reserved for an incidental fishery in the nearshore area, which will be open May 4 on a Monday-Wednesday schedule, which are the days the all depth halibut fishery is closed. Coordinates for the nearshore fishery are available online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/creel/halibut/ . The all depth quota is 9,754 pounds; the nearshore quota is 500 pounds.

Marine Area 2 (Westport): Marine Area 2 opens May 3, two days per week (Sundays and Tuesdays) for three consecutive weeks (the season could close sooner if the quota is reached). The primary fishery is closed May 24 and 26 but will reopen May 31 or June 2 if sufficient quota remains and continue until the quota is achieved, or Sept. 30, whichever occurs first. The northern nearshore area will be open on May 3, and continue seven days per week until the nearshore quota is reached or Sept. 30, whichever occurs first. The quota for the primary fishery is 40,739 pounds; the quota for the northern nearshore fishery is 2,000 pounds.

Marine Areas 3 and 4 (La Push and Neah Bay): Marine areas 3 and 4 open May 14, two days per week, Thursdays and Saturdays, through May 23 (as long as there is sufficient quota). This area will be closed May 28 and 30. If there is available quota, the fishery will re-open June 4 and/or 6. Additional days could be added (Thursdays and Saturdays), depending on the amount of quota available. The areas would remain open until the quota is reached or Sept. 30, whichever occurs first. The combined quota for both areas is 108,030 pounds.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Daily limit for hatchery steelhead will increase - 3:42 p.m. 3/27/2015
Daily limit for hatchery steelhead will increase
on the lower Cowlitz River

Action: Cowlitz River anglers may retain up to 3 hatchery steelhead.

Effective date: April 1, 2015, until further notice.

Species affected: Steelhead.

Location: Cowlitz River from boundary markers at the mouth upstream to 400 feet (or posted markers) below the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery barrier dam.

Reason for action: There has been a strong showing of late winter run hatchery steelhead on the Cowlitz to date. The hatchery brood stock goal is expected to be met.

Other information: Barbless hooks are required. From the Lexington Bridge Drive in Lexington upstream to the Highway 505 Bridge in Toledo, anglers may fish with two poles with a Two-Pole Endorsement.

New rules will be coming out in July. Under recently approved permanent rules, barbed hooks may be used in the month of July. In addition, anglers with a Two-Pole Endorsement may fish with two poles upstream to 400 feet (or posted markers) below the barrier dam beginning July 1.

All other permanent rules apply including the Columbia River Salmon and Steelhead Endorsement.

Information contact: (360) 696-6211.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Federal council adopts alternatives - 2:53 p.m. 3/12/2015
Federal council adopts alternatives
for ocean salmon sport fisheries

VANCOUVER, Wash. - Anglers fishing along the Washington coast will likely see a catch quota for chinook salmon similar to last year's and a lower quota for coho, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) announced today.

Three alternatives for ocean salmon fisheries, approved Thursday for public review by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC), reflect a decline from 2014 in the forecast for Columbia River hatchery coho and a moderate increase in Columbia River chinook. The PFMC establishes fishing seasons in ocean waters three to 200 miles off the Pacific coast.

The expected abundance of hatchery chinook and coho salmon should allow fishery managers to provide recreational anglers with some great fishing opportunities off the Washington coast this year, Ron Warren, fisheries policy lead for WDFW.

"With these alternatives in hand, we will work with stakeholders on the coast and Washington's inside waters to develop a final fishing package for 2015 while meeting our conservation objectives for wild salmon," Warren said.

All three alternatives include recreational mark-selective fisheries for chinook in June. Mark selective fisheries allow anglers to catch and keep abundant hatchery salmon, marked with a missing adipose fine, but require that they release wild salmon.

About 900,000 Columbia River fall chinook salmon are expected back this year. If that run comes in at forecast, it would be the third largest since record-keeping began in 1938. A portion of the run - about 255,000 salmon - is expected to be lower river hatchery chinook, which traditionally have been the backbone of the recreational ocean chinook fishery. In-river fisheries will also benefit from the strong return, Warren said.

Additionally, the ocean abundance of Columbia River coho is forecast to be about 777,000 fish. A significant portion of that run will contribute to the ocean fishery as well.

The PFMC is scheduled to make its final decision on this year's ocean regulations and harvest quotas for recreational and commercial fisheries at its April meeting in Rohnert Park, Calif. The recreational fishing alternatives include the following quotas for fisheries off the Washington coast:

Alternative 1 - 64,000 chinook and 159,200 coho.
Alternative 2 - 62,000 chinook and 134,400 coho.
Alternative 3 - 58,000 chinook and 117,600 coho.
The PFMC last year adopted recreational ocean fishing quotas of 59,100 chinook and 184,800 coho salmon.

Under each option for this year, the ocean recreational fishery would vary:

Alternative 1

Selective fishery for hatchery chinook:

Marine areas 1 (Ilwaco) and 2 (Westport/Ocean): May 30-June 12. Open daily. Daily limit of two salmon, except anglers must release coho and wild chinook.
Marine areas 3 (La Push) and 4 (Neah Bay): May 15-16, May 22-23 and May 30-June 12. Open daily. Daily limit of two salmon, except anglers must release coho and wild chinook.
Traditional ocean salmon fishery for chinook and hatchery coho:

Marine areas 1 and 2: June 13-Sept. 30. Open daily. Daily limit of two salmon, but only one chinook may be retained.
Marine Area 3: June 13-Sept. 30 and Oct. 1-11 in the La Push late season area. Open daily. Daily limit of two salmon, plus two additional pink salmon.
Marine Area 4: June 13-Sept. 30. Open daily. Daily limit of two salmon, plus two additional pink salmon.
Alternative 2

Selective fishery for hatchery chinook:

Marine areas 1 and 2: June 6-19. Open daily. Daily limit of two salmon, except anglers must release coho and wild chinook.
Marine areas 3 and 4: May 22-23 and June 6-19. Open daily. Daily limit of two salmon, except anglers must release coho and wild chinook.
Traditional ocean salmon fishery for chinook and hatchery coho:

Marine areas 1 and 2: June 20-Sept. 30. Open daily. Daily limit of two salmon, but only one chinook may be retained.
Marine Area 3: June 20-Sept. 20 and Sept. 27-Oct. 11 in the La Push late season area. Open daily. Daily limit of two salmon, plus two additional pink salmon.
Marine Area 4: June 20-Sept. 30. Open daily. Daily limit of two salmon, plus two additional pink salmon.
Alternative 3

Selective fishery for hatchery chinook:

Marine areas 1, 2, 3 and 4: June 13-26. Open daily. Daily limit of two salmon, except anglers must release coho and wild chinook.
Traditional ocean salmon fishery for chinook and hatchery coho:

Marine Area 1: June 27-Sept. 30. Open daily. Daily limit of two salmon, but only one chinook may be retained.
Marine Area 2: June 27-Sept. 20. Open daily. Daily limit of two salmon, but only one chinook may be retained.
Marine Area 3: June 27-Sept. 20 and Sept. 27-Oct. 11 in the La Push late season area. Open daily. Daily limit of two salmon, plus two additional pink salmon. \
Marine Area 4: June 27-Sept. 20. Open daily. Daily limit of two salmon, plus two additional pink salmon.
A public hearing on the three alternatives for ocean salmon fisheries is scheduled for March 30 in Westport.

Chinook and coho quotas approved by the PFMC will be part of a comprehensive 2015 salmon fishing package, which includes marine and freshwater fisheries throughout Puget Sound, the Columbia River and Washington's coastal areas. State and tribal co-managers are currently developing those fisheries.

The co-managers will complete the final 2015 salmon fisheries package in conjunction with the PFMC process during its April meeting.

Meanwhile, several public meetings are scheduled in March to discuss regional fisheries issues. The public can comment on the proposed ocean alternatives as well as on other proposed salmon fisheries through WDFW's North of Falcon webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalcon/ . A schedule of public meetings, as well as salmon run-size forecasts and more information about the salmon-season setting process can also be found on the webpage.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA
Noel@lewisriver.com
http://www.lewisriver.com

Strong runs of Columbia River chinook, Puget Sound pink and coho salmon projected OLYMPIA – Fishing prospects look promising for chinook in Washington’s ocean waters and the Columbia River, as well as for coho and pink salmon in areas of Puget Sound, according to state fisheries managers. The forecasts – developed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and treaty Indian tribes – for chinook, coho, sockeye, chum and pink salmon were released at a public meeting in Olympia today. The forecasts mark the starting point for developing the 2015 salmon fishing seasons. The public is encouraged to participate throughout the process by attending various meetings and by using a new online commenting tool, said Ron Warren, fisheries policy lead for WDFW. The commenting tool, a meeting schedule, salmon forecasts and information about the salmon season-setting process are available on WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalcon/ . Over the next several weeks, state and tribal co-managers will develop seasons that focus fishing opportunities on abundant hatchery and wild salmon populations, Warren said. “Ensuring we meet our conservation objectives for depressed wild salmon stocks is the first step in establishing these fisheries,” Warren said. “That is always a challenge, but several of this year’s forecasts suggest we can provide some potentially great fisheries while meeting these goals.” As in past years, salmon-fishing prospects in 2015 vary by area: Columbia River: About 900,000 fall chinook are expected to return to the Columbia River in 2015. That would be the third largest run on record since 1938, said Ron Roler, Columbia River policy coordinator for WDFW. Roughly 70 percent of the chinook anticipated this year – or about 626,000 salmon – is expected to be “upriver brights” headed for areas above Bonneville Dam. The ocean abundance of Columbia River coho this year is expected to be nearly 777,000 fish, down from 964,000 in 2014. Washington’s ocean waters: About 255,000 hatchery chinook are expected to return this year to the lower Columbia River. Those salmon, which are known as “tules,” are the backbone of the recreational ocean chinook fishery. The forecast for returning coho also is strong though down somewhat from last year, said Doug Milward, ocean salmon fishery manager for WDFW. “Coho numbers are down about 20 percent from 2014, but the forecast for lower river chinook is up slightly from last year,” Milward said. “Overall, anglers can look forward to more great fishing opportunities in the ocean this summer.” Puget Sound: Another solid run of coho is expected to return to Puget Sound’s rivers this year. More than 891,000 coho, up 20,000 from last year, are forecast to return to Puget Sound. Central and south Sound are anticipated to be bright spots for coho, said Ryan Lothrop, Puget Sound recreational fishery manager for WDFW. The forecast for summer/fall chinook is down somewhat from last year with about 208,000 chinook returning, Lothrop said. Hatchery chinook make up the bulk of returning fish. More than 6.5 million pink salmon are expected to return to the Sound this year, which is comparable to the number that returned in 2013. Most pink salmon return to Washington’s waters only in odd-numbered years. “A large return of pink salmon provides another reason for anglers to get out on the water and, perhaps, bring someone new to the sport along with them,” Lothrop said. Meanwhile, the forecast of 165,000 sockeye still falls short of the 350,000 minimum needed to consider a recreational sockeye fishery for Lake Washington. Fishery managers, however, will consider sockeye fisheries in Baker Lake and the Skagit River, Lothrop said. - 2:08 p.m. 3/2/2015
Strong runs of Columbia River
chinook,
Puget Sound pink and coho salmon
projected

OLYMPIA – Fishing prospects look
promising for chinook in
Washington’s ocean waters and the
Columbia River, as well as for coho
and pink salmon in areas of Puget
Sound, according to state fisheries
managers.

The forecasts – developed by the
Washington Department of Fish and
Wildlife (WDFW) and treaty Indian
tribes – for chinook, coho,
sockeye, chum and pink salmon were
released at a public meeting in
Olympia today.

The forecasts mark the starting
point for developing the 2015
salmon fishing seasons. The public
is encouraged to participate
throughout the process by attending
various meetings and by using a new
online commenting tool, said Ron
Warren, fisheries policy lead for
WDFW.

The commenting tool, a meeting
schedule, salmon forecasts and
information about the salmon
season-setting process are
available on WDFW’s website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfal
con/ .

Over the next several weeks, state
and tribal co-managers will develop
seasons that focus fishing
opportunities on abundant hatchery
and wild salmon populations, Warren
said.

“Ensuring we meet our conservation
objectives for depressed wild
salmon stocks is the first step in
establishing these fisheries,”
Warren said. “That is always a
challenge, but several of this
year’s forecasts suggest we can
provide some potentially great
fisheries while meeting these
goals.”

As in past years, salmon-fishing
prospects in 2015 vary by area:

Columbia River: About 900,000 fall
chinook are expected to return to
the Columbia River in 2015. That
would be the third largest run on
record since 1938, said Ron Roler,
Columbia River policy coordinator
for WDFW.
Roughly 70 percent of the chinook
anticipated this year – or about
626,000 salmon – is expected to be
“upriver brights” headed for areas
above Bonneville Dam.
The ocean abundance of Columbia
River coho this year is expected to
be nearly 777,000 fish, down from
964,000 in 2014.

Washington’s ocean waters: About
255,000 hatchery chinook are
expected to return this year to the
lower Columbia River. Those salmon,
which are known as “tules,” are the
backbone of the recreational ocean
chinook fishery.
The forecast for returning coho
also is strong though down somewhat
from last year, said Doug Milward,
ocean salmon fishery manager for
WDFW.
“Coho numbers are down about 20
percent from 2014, but the forecast
for lower river chinook is up
slightly from last year,” Milward
said. “Overall, anglers can look
forward to more great fishing
opportunities in the ocean this
summer.”

Puget Sound: Another solid run of
coho is expected to return to Puget
Sound’s rivers this year. More than
891,000 coho, up 20,000 from last
year, are forecast to return to
Puget Sound.
Central and south Sound are
anticipated to be bright spots for
coho, said Ryan Lothrop, Puget
Sound recreational fishery manager
for WDFW.
The forecast for summer/fall
chinook is down somewhat from last
year with about 208,000 chinook
returning, Lothrop said. Hatchery
chinook make up the bulk of
returning fish.
More than 6.5 million pink salmon
are expected to return to the Sound
this year, which is comparable to
the number that returned in 2013.
Most pink salmon return to
Washington’s waters only in odd-
numbered years.
“A large return of pink salmon
provides another reason for anglers
to get out on the water and,
perhaps, bring someone new to the
sport along with them,” Lothrop
said.
Meanwhile, the forecast of
165,000 sockeye still falls short
of the 350,000 minimum needed to
consider a recreational sockeye
fishery for Lake Washington.
Fishery managers, however, will
consider sockeye fisheries in Baker
Lake and the Skagit River, Lothrop
said.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisreiver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Southwest Washington - 4:51 p.m. 2/27/2015
Southwest Washington
(Clark, Cowlitz, Klickitat, Lewis, Skamania and Wahkiakum counties)

Fishing: Steelhead fishing is heating up on the Cowlitz and Kalama rivers, kokanee are biting at Merwin Reservoir, and five area lakes are set to receive thousands of rainbow trout this month. Starting March 2, sturgeon fishing is limited to catch-and-release in the Bonneville Pool, but anglers can keep one legal-size fish per day in The Dalles and John Day pools until annual harvest guidelines have been met.

Even so, the main attraction this month is the spring chinook fishery in the lower Columbia River, the first major salmon fishery of 2015. Anglers have already reeled in several nice springers, but the real action begins later in March.

Based on pre-season projections, 312,600 adult spring chinook are expected to return to the big river this year, including 232,500 upriver fish bound for rivers and streams above Bonneville Dam. The forecast for upriver chinook is just shy of last year’s return of 242,600 upriver fish.

“The stage is set for another great spring chinook fishery this year,” said Ron Roler, Columbia River policy manager for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). “Not only is the run forecast well above average, but water conditions also appear to be favorable for the upcoming season.”

Initial seasons set by fishery managers from Washington and Oregon are as follows:


•Below Bonneville Dam: Open from March 1 through April 10 to boat and bank fishing from Buoy 10 upstream to Beacon Rock. Bank fishing will also be allowed from Beacon Rock upriver to the fishing boundary just below the dam. The sport fishery will be closed March 24, March 31, and April 7 (Tuesdays) to allow for potential commercial fisheries. The adult daily catch limit is two hatchery salmon or steelhead in combination, of which no more than one may be a chinook. •Above Bonneville Dam: Open daily from March 16 through May 6 to boat and bank anglers between the Tower Island powerlines (six miles below The Dalles Dam) and the Washington/Oregon state line, 17 miles above McNary Dam. Bank anglers can also fish from Bonneville Dam upriver to the Tower Island powerlines during that time. As below the dam, the adult daily catch limit will be two hatchery salmon or steelhead in combination, of which no more than one may be a chinook.
Anglers are required to use barbless hooks in both areas, and release any salmon or steelhead not visibly marked as a hatchery fish by a clipped adipose fin.

Under this year’s initial catch guidelines, anglers fishing below the dam will be allowed to catch up to 11,500 spring chinook before an updated run forecast is released in late April or early May. Another 1,200 adult upriver chinook will be reserved for anglers fishing between Bonneville Dam and the Washington/Oregon state line.

To guard against overestimating this year’s run, the states will again manage the fisheries with a 30 percent buffer until the forecast is updated with information about actual returns.

Several tributaries will also be open to fishing for hatchery spring chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead in March. A strong return of 11,200 spring chinook is expected this year to the Cowlitz River, which is currently open with an adult daily catch limit of two hatchery salmon. Late stock winter hatchery steelhead have also been biting anglers’ hooks on the Cowlitz.

On the Kalama River, anglers can catch one adult hatchery salmon per day, along with hatchery steelhead. Returns of late stock winter hatchery steelhead have been good so far – so good that the daily limit on the lower Kalama will increase to three fish starting March 1.

Wind River and Drano Lake open for salmon fishing March 16, with a daily limit two hatchery chinook, or two hatchery steelhead, or one of each.

In anticipation of low returns, the mainstem Lewis and North Fork Lewis rivers are closed to spring chinook fishing under an emergency rule, although both remain open to fishing for hatchery steelhead.

In addition, anglers should be aware that March 15 is the last day to fish for steelhead on Abernathy, Cedar (Clark Co.), Germany, Mill (Cowlitz Co.), Rock (Skamania Co.), and Salmon (Clark Co.) creeks and on the Coweeman, Elochoman, Grays, East Fork Lewis, South Fork Toutle, and Washougal rivers

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Plenty of good reasons to renew - 4:45 p.m. 2/27/2015
Plenty of good reasons to renew
fishing and hunting licenses soon

Spring chinook salmon are moving into the lower Columbia River, several eastside lakes open for trout fishing March 1, and razor clam digs are scheduled this month – including the first dig of the season on morning tides.

These fisheries are just the first of many set to open in the weeks ahead, and the year’s first hunting seasons aren’t far behind. A spring wild turkey season for hunters under age 16 is scheduled April 4-5 prior to the start of the general spring turkey hunt April 15.

With a new season of outdoor adventures about to begin, Washingtonians might want to consider purchasing 2015-16 fishing and hunting licenses before current licenses expire at midnight March 31.

“We encourage people to renew their fishing and hunting licenses early, so they can take advantage of all the great recreational opportunities available throughout the year,” said Joe Stohr, deputy director of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).

The cost of fishing and hunting licenses currently remain the same as last year. All fees included, a resident adult freshwater fishing license is $29.50; saltwater is $30.05; and a combination license is $54.25. Resident hunting licenses vary with package options, ranging from a small-game license at $40.50 to a deer/elk/cougar/bear combination license for $95.50.

Most annual licenses include a WDFW vehicle access pass, which gives people access to more than 700 WDFW water access sites throughout the state. Or, for $35, individuals can purchase an annual Discover Pass, which also provides vehicle access to state parks and other state lands.

Fishing licenses, hunting licenses and the Discover Pass are all available online ( https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov/ ), by phone (1-866-246-9453) and from license dealers around the state.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Viewing Fishing Reports 11-20 (29 reports)

Previous Page        Page # 1 2 3         Next Page

For fishing pictures go to LewisRiver.com monthy fishing pictures.
For more information go to Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Call 1.800.547.1501 for updated reservoir levels and estimated river flow below Merwin.
For N. F . Lewis River flow go to River Flows At Ariel.
For East Fork Lewis River flow go to East Fork Lewis River Near Heisson, Wa.

Stream flow and reservoir levels at:
Lewis River at Woodland       Speelyai Creek      Muddy Creek
Lewis River at Ariel      Lewis River Reservoir Levels

We are very pleased to offer you this fishing report site. Please only post reports or information that is of interest to all. Many people want a fast report and don't have time to read a lot of other stuff. Inappropriate posts will be deleted. Thanks, Noel Johnson.

Back to the
LewisRiver.com Fishing Page

Click here for Kress Lake - Click here for Merrill Lake
Click here for Horseshoe Lake - Click here for Klineline Ponds
Click here for Coldwater Lake - Click here for Silver Lake
Click here for Battle Ground Lake - Click here for Kalama River

WoodlandApe CaveArtsBirdsBusinessesCampingCatsChurchesCitiesCitizens
Day TripsDogsEast ForkExperience WAThe FallsFishingGarden
Gifford PinchotGrist MillHistoryHorsesHuntingLelooskaLilacsLinks
Merrill LakeMotorcyclesMt. AdamsMt. St. Helens
NewsPresentationsRecreationSummer VacationSW WA EventsTourismTreesTulips

Loading

LewisRiver.com

Web site owned by NWNature.com Inc. Inquiries to Noel Johnson.

Site maintained by Farnell Web Design