LewisRiver.com Fishing Reports

Watch LewisRiver.com's 10th Anniversary Video!

Click here to buy a Washington Fishing Licence


Click here for high water information.

Scroll down to fishing reports.

Click here for Gone Catchin Guide Service.
Click above for Gone Catchin Guide Service.

Click here for Lewis River RV Park and Country Store.
Click above for Lewis River RV Park and Country Store.

Click here to go to Harpers Tackle & Outdoor.
Click above to go to Harpers Tackle & Outdoor.

Click here to go to Gilliano's Pizza and Ice Cream Parlor.
Click above to go to page with $3.00 off coupon.

Take a safe boating course and get your Washington boat license to increase your fishing success.

Phone number to report snaggers Toll-Free at 1-877-933-9847. More info, click here.

Click here for information on when runs of fish enter the North Fork Lewis.

Click here for current fish counts over the Columbia River dams.

River Access Below Merwin Dam

You are currently viewing the Fishing Reports
[ Submit a Report ]

Viewing Fishing Reports 31-40 (118 reports)

Previous Page        Page # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10         Next Page

WDFW restricts target-shooting on the Wenas Wildlife Area OLYMPIA Starting June 1, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) will restrict target-shooting hours in the Wenas Wildlife Area southwest of Ellensburg to help reduce the risk of wildfires. The restriction, which will be in effect through Sept. 30, will limit target shooting to the hours between sunrise and 10 a.m., when the risk of starting a wildfire is less severe. Cindi Confer Morris, manager of the WDFW wildlife area, said bullets have sparked more than a dozen fires at Wenas in recent years, including one that torched 9,000 acres. In response, the department has restricted target shooting every summer since 2012, and closed the wildlife area to all shooting in 2014 and 2015 due to extreme fire danger. "Unfortunately, we could be facing severe fire conditions again this summer," Confer Morris said. "The vegetation grew like crazy in early spring, and now it's drying out and curing in the warm weather that has followed." Public notice of the limited hours will be posted at all entry points and at established target shooting sites in the wildlife area. State land managers ask that all visitors to the wildlife area whether target-shooting or not take precautions to avoid sparking a wildfire. Information about local fire danger is available at https://fortress.wa.gov/dnr/protection/firedanger/ WDFW adopted the rule in cooperation with the Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR), which owns lands within the 114,150-acre wildlife area. In April, WDFW held public meetings in Ellensburg and Selah to discuss target-shooting options for the Wenas Wildlife Area. The department's preferred alternative would permanently restrict target shooting to two designated sites to reduce the risk of wildfire, increase public safety and protect wildlife habitat. Alternatives are posted at http://wdfw.wa.gov/lands/wildlife_areas/wenas/. Comments can be addressed to Cindi.Confer@dfw.wa.gov Campfire restrictions are also in place at the Wenas, Colockum, L.T. Murray, Oak Creek and Sunnyside-Snake River wildlife areas through Oct. 15, and at the Columbia Basin Wildlife Area through Oct. 31. Fireworks and incendiary devices including tracer rounds and exploding targets are also prohibited to reduce wildfire risks. For more information on WDFW wildlife areas, see the department's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/lands/wildlife_areas/ Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list. Visit the WDFW News Release Archive at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/ To UNSUBSCRIBE - 4:17 p.m. 5/31/2016
WDFW restricts target-shooting on the
Wenas Wildlife Area

OLYMPIA Starting June 1, the
Washington Department of Fish and
Wildlife (WDFW) will restrict target-
shooting hours in the Wenas Wildlife
Area southwest of Ellensburg to help
reduce the risk of wildfires.

The restriction, which will be in
effect through Sept. 30, will limit
target shooting to the hours between
sunrise and 10 a.m., when the risk of
starting a wildfire is less severe.

Cindi Confer Morris, manager of the
WDFW wildlife area, said bullets have
sparked more than a dozen fires at
Wenas in recent years, including one
that torched 9,000 acres.

In response, the department has
restricted target shooting every
summer since 2012, and closed the
wildlife area to all shooting in 2014
and 2015 due to extreme fire danger.

"Unfortunately, we could be facing
severe fire conditions again this
summer," Confer Morris said. "The
vegetation grew like crazy in early
spring, and now it's drying out and
curing in the warm weather that has
followed."

Public notice of the limited hours
will be posted at all entry points
and at established target shooting
sites in the wildlife area.

State land managers ask that all
visitors to the wildlife area
whether target-shooting or not take
precautions to avoid sparking a
wildfire. Information about local
fire danger is available at
https://fortress.wa.gov/dnr/protectio
n/firedanger/

WDFW adopted the rule in cooperation
with the Washington Department of
Natural Resources (DNR), which owns
lands within the 114,150-acre
wildlife area.

In April, WDFW held public meetings
in Ellensburg and Selah to discuss
target-shooting options for the Wenas
Wildlife Area. The department's
preferred alternative would
permanently restrict target shooting
to two designated sites to reduce the
risk of wildfire, increase public
safety and protect wildlife habitat.

Alternatives are posted at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lands/wildlife_are
as/wenas/. Comments can be addressed
to Cindi.Confer@dfw.wa.gov

Campfire restrictions are also in
place at the Wenas, Colockum, L.T.
Murray, Oak Creek and Sunnyside-Snake
River wildlife areas through Oct. 15,
and at the Columbia Basin Wildlife
Area through Oct. 31. Fireworks and
incendiary devices including tracer
rounds and exploding targets are
also prohibited to reduce wildfire
risks.

For more information on WDFW wildlife
areas, see the department's website
at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lands/wildlife_are
as/

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to the
WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the WDFW News Release Archive
at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/
To UNSUBSCRIBE

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

mouth of lewis river - 3:15 p.m. 5/27/2016
is the mouth of the lewis river to warrior rock area still restricted?or is it open for the memorial day Chinook fishery?

pirate eddy - battleground wa 98604
haskinsbe@comcast.net

WDFW reminds would-be rescuers to leave young wildlife alone OLYMPIA With temperatures rising and summer drawing near, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is reminding campers, hikers and others who enjoy spending time outdoors to leave any wildlife they encounter alone. With deer fawns, raccoons, seal pups, baby birds and other young animals now on view around the state, the department is receiving an increasing number of calls from people asking what to do with animals they have "rescued" from the wild, said Mick Cope, WDFW game manager. "People find young animals and birds alone and assume they've been abandoned by their parents," Cope said. "In fact, their parents are usually nearby and may even be watching as their fawns, kits, and chicks are removed by would-be rescuers." Cope said deer often leave their young for hours at a time to forage and avoid attracting predators with their own body scent. The best thing people can do if they find a fawn without its mother is to leave it alone so its mother can return to it, he said. "Even with the best intentions, removing animals from the wild greatly reduces their chance of survival," Cope said. Tina Hamilton, statewide dispatcher for WDFW's law enforcement program, has seen a marked increase in reports of "rescued" wildlife in recent weeks. "We recently had a situation where someone picked up a newborn fawn and left it at a fire station in rural Pierce County," Hamilton said. "That fawn still had its umbilical cord, so how far away could its mother have been?" While WDFW may attempt to place displaced animals with wildlife rehabilitators, many do not survive, Cope said. He also noted that holding wildlife in captivity is a misdemeanor in Washington state. Under state law, only licensed wildlife rehabilitators can hold wildlife in captivity. "If people want to help, we ask that they give young wildlife a wide berth and restrain pets that might harass them," Cope said. "Cats, in particular, can take a toll on songbirds if they're left to roam outdoors." For more information about appropriate behavior around wildlife, see WDFW's Living with Wildlife website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/health/rehabilitation/when_not_to_rescue.html Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. - 2:53 p.m. 5/27/2016
WDFW reminds would-be rescuers to
leave young wildlife alone

OLYMPIA With temperatures rising
and summer drawing near, the
Washington Department of Fish and
Wildlife (WDFW) is reminding campers,
hikers and others who enjoy spending
time outdoors to leave any wildlife
they encounter alone.

With deer fawns, raccoons, seal pups,
baby birds and other young animals
now on view around the state, the
department is receiving an increasing
number of calls from people asking
what to do with animals they have
"rescued" from the wild, said Mick
Cope, WDFW game manager.

"People find young animals and birds
alone and assume they've been
abandoned by their parents," Cope
said. "In fact, their parents are
usually nearby and may even be
watching as their fawns, kits, and
chicks are removed by would-be
rescuers."

Cope said deer often leave their
young for hours at a time to forage
and avoid attracting predators with
their own body scent. The best thing
people can do if they find a fawn
without its mother is to leave it
alone so its mother can return to it,
he said.

"Even with the best intentions,
removing animals from the wild
greatly reduces their chance of
survival," Cope said.

Tina Hamilton, statewide dispatcher
for WDFW's law enforcement program,
has seen a marked increase in reports
of "rescued" wildlife in recent
weeks.

"We recently had a situation where
someone picked up a newborn fawn and
left it at a fire station in rural
Pierce County," Hamilton said. "That
fawn still had its umbilical cord, so
how far away could its mother have
been?"

While WDFW may attempt to place
displaced animals with wildlife
rehabilitators, many do not survive,
Cope said.

He also noted that holding wildlife
in captivity is a misdemeanor in
Washington state. Under state law,
only licensed wildlife rehabilitators
can hold wildlife in captivity.

"If people want to help, we ask that
they give young wildlife a wide berth
and restrain pets that might harass
them," Cope said. "Cats, in
particular, can take a toll on
songbirds if they're left to roam
outdoors."

For more information about
appropriate behavior around wildlife,
see WDFW's Living with Wildlife
website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/healt
h/rehabilitation/when_not_to_rescue.h
tml

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Salmon seasons set for Puget Sound; area waters expected to re-open to fishing soon OLYMPIA State and tribal leaders today reached an agreement on Puget Sound fisheries that is expected to pave the way toward opening summer salmon seasons and waters recently closed to recreational fishing. The co-managers agreed on this year's Puget Sound salmon seasons after several weeks of extended negotiations. Anticipated low numbers of salmon especially coho returning to Puget Sound made this year's negotiations challenging. Agreement on fishing seasons is a key step in obtaining a joint federal permit required to conduct fisheries in Puget Sound waters, where some fish stocks are protected under the federal Endangered Species Act. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) closed many Puget Sound-area waters to fishing on May 1, after the previous federal authorization to conduct fisheries expired. "We plan to re-open those waters as soon as we have federal approval," said John Long, salmon fisheries policy lead for WDFW. "We anticipate getting the new permit within a few weeks." More information on the fisheries that closed May 1 is available on the department's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/pugetsound_salmon_update/. In the meantime, anglers can begin making plans to fish for salmon this summer in Puget Sound-area waters, where most of those fisheries will target hatchery chinook. Salmon fisheries throughout the Puget Sound area will be constrained to protect coho salmon and other weak salmon stocks, Long said. "Conservation is key in developing these fisheries, especially in a year with such low returns expected back to the Sound," Long said. "We worked hard to meet those conservation needs and provide fisheries that are meaningful for both state and tribal fishers." Changes in Puget Sound salmon fisheries since last summer can be found on WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalcon/, where information on Washington's salmon fisheries in ocean waters and the Columbia River also is available. Some of those changes include: Marine Area 10 (Seattle/Bremerton) will be open from July 16 to Aug. 15, or when the quota of 1,395 fish is met. The area was closed last summer to chinook retention. Marine Area 9 (Admiralty Inlet) will be open on the same dates as Marine Area 10, but also could close sooner if the quota of 3,056 fish is met. There will be no coho fisheries in marine areas of Puget Sound, with the exception of Hood Canal, where sufficient coho are forecast to return. WDFW is closing some rivers and marine areas to all salmon fishing during September and October, the peak months for coho salmon to return to Puget Sound. Rivers slated for closures include the Skagit, Stillaguamish and Nisqually. Lakes Washington and Sammamish also will be closed to fishing during those months. The lower mainstem of the Skokomish River will be closed to non-tribal fishing this year due to a claim by the tribe that the river is part of the Skokomish Reservation and public access is prohibited. WDFW is working to evaluate this claim. The closed area includes the section of river from the Tacoma Public Utilities power lines (near the mouth of the river) upstream to the Bonneville Power Administration power lines (upstream and west of Highway 101). The department advises anglers to observe this closure of the state's fishery that will be monitored by WDFW police. More details on salmon seasons in Puget Sound and other areas of Washington will be available on WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/ later this month. For - 5:52 p.m. 5/26/2016
Salmon seasons set for Puget Sound;
area waters expected to re-open to
fishing soon

OLYMPIA State and tribal leaders
today reached an agreement on Puget
Sound fisheries that is expected to
pave the way toward opening summer
salmon seasons and waters recently
closed to recreational fishing.

The co-managers agreed on this year's
Puget Sound salmon seasons after
several weeks of extended
negotiations. Anticipated low numbers
of salmon especially coho
returning to Puget Sound made this
year's negotiations challenging.

Agreement on fishing seasons is a key
step in obtaining a joint federal
permit required to conduct fisheries
in Puget Sound waters, where some
fish stocks are protected under the
federal Endangered Species Act.

The Washington Department of Fish and
Wildlife (WDFW) closed many Puget
Sound-area waters to fishing on May
1, after the previous federal
authorization to conduct fisheries
expired.

"We plan to re-open those waters as
soon as we have federal approval,"
said John Long, salmon fisheries
policy lead for WDFW. "We anticipate
getting the new permit within a few
weeks."

More information on the fisheries
that closed May 1 is available on the
department's website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/pugetsound
_salmon_update/.

In the meantime, anglers can begin
making plans to fish for salmon this
summer in Puget Sound-area waters,
where most of those fisheries will
target hatchery chinook. Salmon
fisheries throughout the Puget Sound
area will be constrained to protect
coho salmon and other weak salmon
stocks, Long said.

"Conservation is key in developing
these fisheries, especially in a year
with such low returns expected back
to the Sound," Long said. "We worked
hard to meet those conservation needs
and provide fisheries that are
meaningful for both state and tribal
fishers."

Changes in Puget Sound salmon
fisheries since last summer can be
found on WDFW's website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalco
n/, where information on Washington's
salmon fisheries in ocean waters and
the Columbia River also is available.
Some of those changes include:

Marine Area 10 (Seattle/Bremerton)
will be open from July 16 to Aug. 15,
or when the quota of 1,395 fish is
met. The area was closed last summer
to chinook retention. Marine Area 9
(Admiralty Inlet) will be open on the
same dates as Marine Area 10, but
also could close sooner if the quota
of 3,056 fish is met.
There will be no coho fisheries in
marine areas of Puget Sound, with the
exception of Hood Canal, where
sufficient coho are forecast to
return.
WDFW is closing some rivers and
marine areas to all salmon fishing
during September and October, the
peak months for coho salmon to return
to Puget Sound. Rivers slated for
closures include the Skagit,
Stillaguamish and Nisqually. Lakes
Washington and Sammamish also will be
closed to fishing during those
months.
The lower mainstem of the Skokomish
River will be closed to non-tribal
fishing this year due to a claim by
the tribe that the river is part of
the Skokomish Reservation and public
access is prohibited. WDFW is working
to evaluate this claim. The closed
area includes the section of river
from the Tacoma Public Utilities
power lines (near the mouth of the
river) upstream to the Bonneville
Power Administration power lines
(upstream and west of Highway 101).
The department advises anglers to
observe this closure of the state's
fishery that will be monitored by
WDFW police.
More details on salmon seasons in
Puget Sound and other areas of
Washington will be available on
WDFW's website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulation
s/ later this month.

For

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Salmon co-managers agree on Puget Sound fisheries, will work to improve season-setting process OLYMPIA State and tribal fishery managers today agreed to Puget Sound salmon-fishing seasons for 2016, ending several weeks of extended negotiations. Officials with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Gov. Jay Inslee's office, and treaty tribes also agreed to work together to improve the process of setting salmon-fishing seasons, known as "North of Falcon." The co-managers did not reach agreement during the annual season-setting process, which concluded in mid-April. Anticipated low numbers of salmon especially coho returning to Puget Sound made this year's negotiations challenging. "Our first priority is to develop fisheries that are consistent with efforts to protect and rebuild wild salmon stocks," said Jim Unsworth, director of WDFW. "Reaching an agreement on how to do that proved very challenging this year. Ultimately, we agreed on a package of fisheries that places a priority on conservation while allowing for limited fishing opportunities in Puget Sound." State and tribal fisheries will be greatly reduced this year in Puget Sound as low returns of chinook, chum and coho are expected. The tribes and state have closed all fisheries directed at returning coho, except in a few areas, where sufficient fish are expected back this year. With this season's fisheries resolved, the co-managers will focus on addressing long-term resource management concerns, such as restoring habitat and boosting salmon stocks. "Habitat restoration and protection must be at the center of that effort," said Lorraine Loomis, chair of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission. "There is a direct connection between salmon habitat and fishing opportunities. We can't expect salmon to thrive while their habitat continues to be lost and damaged." WDFW and tribal leaders said they appreciated the governor's leadership and participation in the process, and that they remain committed to co-management of the state's shared resources. They believe the state and tribes are most effective when working together to conserve fish, wildlife and their habitat. Changes to this year's Puget Sound sport salmon fisheries can be found on WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalcon/, where information on recreational salmon fisheries in ocean waters and the Columbia River also is available. For information on tribal fisheries, contact the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission (http://nwifc.org/). Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. - 5:50 p.m. 5/26/2016
Salmon co-managers agree on Puget
Sound fisheries,
will work to improve season-setting
process

OLYMPIA State and tribal fishery
managers today agreed to Puget Sound
salmon-fishing seasons for 2016,
ending several weeks of extended
negotiations.

Officials with the Washington
Department of Fish and Wildlife
(WDFW), Gov. Jay Inslee's office, and
treaty tribes also agreed to work
together to improve the process of
setting salmon-fishing seasons, known
as "North of Falcon." The co-managers
did not reach agreement during the
annual season-setting process, which
concluded in mid-April.

Anticipated low numbers of salmon
especially coho returning to Puget
Sound made this year's negotiations
challenging.

"Our first priority is to develop
fisheries that are consistent with
efforts to protect and rebuild wild
salmon stocks," said Jim Unsworth,
director of WDFW. "Reaching an
agreement on how to do that proved
very challenging this year.
Ultimately, we agreed on a package of
fisheries that places a priority on
conservation while allowing for
limited fishing opportunities in
Puget Sound."

State and tribal fisheries will be
greatly reduced this year in Puget
Sound as low returns of chinook, chum
and coho are expected. The tribes and
state have closed all fisheries
directed at returning coho, except in
a few areas, where sufficient fish
are expected back this year.

With this season's fisheries
resolved, the co-managers will focus
on addressing long-term resource
management concerns, such as
restoring habitat and boosting salmon
stocks.

"Habitat restoration and protection
must be at the center of that
effort," said Lorraine Loomis, chair
of the Northwest Indian Fisheries
Commission. "There is a direct
connection between salmon habitat and
fishing opportunities. We can't
expect salmon to thrive while their
habitat continues to be lost and
damaged."

WDFW and tribal leaders said they
appreciated the governor's leadership
and participation in the process, and
that they remain committed to co-
management of the state's shared
resources. They believe the state and
tribes are most effective when
working together to conserve fish,
wildlife and their habitat.

Changes to this year's Puget Sound
sport salmon fisheries can be found
on WDFW's website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalco
n/, where information on recreational
salmon fisheries in ocean waters and
the Columbia River also is available.

For information on tribal fisheries,
contact the Northwest Indian
Fisheries Commission
(http://nwifc.org/).

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

washougal - 9:20 a.m. 5/26/2016
Been fishing the washougal all but 5
days since it opened april 15. Lost
3 fish in april and have seen (not
hooked) just 2 fish in may. I fish
only one 75 yard area at noon daily
for 45 minutes.

alan - washougal wa
west

WDFW invites youth to participate in firearm safety bookmark design contest OLYMPIA The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) Master Hunter Advisory Group invites youth to participate in a bookmark design contest that focuses on firearm safety rules. Youth under age 18 are encouraged to create a bookmark that illustrates one or more of the following key firearm safety rules: Treat every firearm as if it's loaded. Always point the firearm in a safe direction. Be sure of your target and what is behind it. Keep your finger outside the trigger guard and off the trigger until you are ready to shoot. "Exposing youth to these four key safety rules will help increase awareness that all firearm incidents can be prevented," said WDFW Hunter Education Division Manager, David Whipple. The contest has three age groups: age 9 and under, ages 10-14 and ages 15-17. The official entry template can be found online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/huntered/. Participants should mail their entries to WDFW Volunteer Program Manager, P.O. Box 43139, Olympia, WA 98504. All entries must be postmarked no later than July 8, 2016. Winners will be announced on National Hunting and Fishing Day, September 24, 2016, and posted to the Hunter Education web page, http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/huntered/. Prizes will be awarded for the first, second and third place bookmark in each age group. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list. Visit the WDFW News Release Archive at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/ To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html - 8:49 a.m. 5/26/2016
WDFW invites youth to participate in
firearm safety bookmark design
contest

OLYMPIA The Washington Department
of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) Master
Hunter Advisory Group invites youth
to participate in a bookmark design
contest that focuses on firearm
safety rules.

Youth under age 18 are encouraged to
create a bookmark that illustrates
one or more of the following key
firearm safety rules:

Treat every firearm as if it's
loaded.
Always point the firearm in a safe
direction.
Be sure of your target and what is
behind it.
Keep your finger outside the trigger
guard and off the trigger until you
are ready to shoot.
"Exposing youth to these four key
safety rules will help increase
awareness that all firearm incidents
can be prevented," said WDFW Hunter
Education Division Manager, David
Whipple.

The contest has three age groups: age
9 and under, ages 10-14 and ages 15-
17.

The official entry template can be
found online at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/huntered/.
Participants should mail their
entries to WDFW Volunteer Program
Manager, P.O. Box 43139, Olympia, WA
98504. All entries must be postmarked
no later than July 8, 2016.

Winners will be announced on National
Hunting and Fishing Day, September
24, 2016, and posted to the Hunter
Education web page,
http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/huntered/.
Prizes will be awarded for the
first, second and third place
bookmark in each age group.

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to the
WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the WDFW News Release Archive
at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing
list:
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.
html

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Snake River spring chinook fisheries to close Action: Spring chinook fishing on the Snake River to close. Species affected: Chinook salmon. Locations: A) Below Ice Harbor Dam: Snake River from the southbound Highway 12 Bridge near Pasco upstream about 7 miles to the fishing restriction boundary below Ice Harbor Dam; B) Below Little Goose Dam: Snake River from Texas Rapids boat launch (south side of the river upstream from the mouth of Tucannon River) to the fishing restriction boundary below Little Goose Dam. This zone includes the rock and concrete area between the juvenile bypass return pipe and Little Goose Dam along the south shoreline of the facility (including the walkway area locally known as "the Wall" in front of the juvenile collection facility); C) Clarkston: Snake River from the downstream edge of the large power lines crossing the Snake River (just upstream from West Evans Road on the south shore) upstream about 3.5 miles to the Washington state line (from the east levee of the Greenbelt boat launch in Clarkston northwest across the Snake River to the WA/ID boundary waters marker on the Whitman County shore). Dates: Areas A (Below Ice Harbor Dam) and C (Clarkston) will close immediately. Area B (Below Little Goose Dam) will close one hour after official sunset on Monday May 30, 2016. Reason for action: Based on the current harvest estimates and anticipated harvest at Little Goose through Monday next week, state fishery managers anticipate that 1,300-1,350 adult hatchery chinook to have been harvested. This will be very close to the current Snake River allotment amount of 1,354 adults based on the current run size prediction. Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. - 4:38 p.m. 5/25/2016
Snake River spring chinook fisheries
to close

Action: Spring chinook fishing on the
Snake River to close.

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Locations:

A) Below Ice Harbor Dam: Snake River
from the southbound Highway 12 Bridge
near Pasco upstream about 7 miles to
the fishing restriction boundary
below Ice Harbor Dam;

B) Below Little Goose Dam: Snake
River from Texas Rapids boat launch
(south side of the river upstream
from the mouth of Tucannon River) to
the fishing restriction boundary
below Little Goose Dam. This zone
includes the rock and concrete area
between the juvenile bypass return
pipe and Little Goose Dam along the
south shoreline of the facility
(including the walkway area locally
known as "the Wall" in front of the
juvenile collection facility);

C) Clarkston: Snake River from the
downstream edge of the large power
lines crossing the Snake River (just
upstream from West Evans Road on the
south shore) upstream about 3.5 miles
to the Washington state line (from
the east levee of the Greenbelt boat
launch in Clarkston northwest across
the Snake River to the WA/ID boundary
waters marker on the Whitman County
shore).

Dates:

Areas A (Below Ice Harbor Dam) and C
(Clarkston) will close immediately.
Area B (Below Little Goose Dam) will
close one hour after official sunset
on Monday May 30, 2016.
Reason for action: Based on the
current harvest estimates and
anticipated harvest at Little Goose
through Monday next week, state
fishery managers anticipate that
1,300-1,350 adult hatchery chinook to
have been harvested. This will be
very close to the current Snake River
allotment amount of 1,354 adults
based on the current run size
prediction.

Fishers must have a current
Washington fishing license,
appropriate to the fishery. Check the
WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules
pamphlet for details on fishing
seasons and regulations. Fishing
rules are subject to change. Check
the WDFW Fishing hotline for the
latest rule information at (360) 902-
2500, press 2 for recreational rules.
For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline
call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-
866-880-5431.
Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

WDFW seeks public participation in Oak Creek Wildlife Area plan OLYMPIA - The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) will hold a public workshop June 6 to discuss the development of a new management plan for the Oak Creek Wildlife Area. The wildlife area consists of three separate units that cover roughly 67,100 acres in Yakima and Kittitas counties. The management plan will address the status of wildlife species and their habitat, wildlife area restoration efforts and public recreation, said Clay Sprague, WDFW lands division manager. "We want to encourage people who are interested in the wildlife area to help shape our plan, including how we manage habitat and public use," Sprague said. The workshop is scheduled from 6 to 8 p.m., June 6, at the West Valley Fire and Rescue offices located at 10000 Zier Road, Yakima. At the meeting, WDFW staff members will review the wildlife area's history, discuss the planning process and ask for public comments. As the new management plan is developed, the department will consider input from the public as well as feedback and guidance from the Oak Creek Wildlife Area advisory committee, Sprague said. The advisory committee consists of citizens and stakeholders who review and provide input on wildlife area management activities. Information on the wildlife area's three units is available on WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/lands/wildlife_areas/oak_creek/ There will be additional opportunities for public input, including at upcoming advisory committee meetings and when the draft plan is developed. The department is revising management plans for its 33 wildlife areas to reflect current conditions and identify new priorities and initiatives, Sprague said. WDFW also is updating the management plans for Sinlahekin and Scotch Creek wildlife areas in Okanogan County, Klickitat Wildlife Area in Klickitat County, and Snoqualmie Wildlife Area in King and Snohomish counties. For more - 10:23 a.m. 5/25/2016
WDFW seeks public participation in
Oak Creek Wildlife Area plan

OLYMPIA - The Washington Department
of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) will hold
a public workshop June 6 to discuss
the development of a new management
plan for the Oak Creek Wildlife Area.

The wildlife area consists of three
separate units that cover roughly
67,100 acres in Yakima and Kittitas
counties. The management plan will
address the status of wildlife
species and their habitat, wildlife
area restoration efforts and public
recreation, said Clay Sprague, WDFW
lands division manager.

"We want to encourage people who are
interested in the wildlife area to
help shape our plan, including how we
manage habitat and public use,"
Sprague said.

The workshop is scheduled from 6 to 8
p.m., June 6, at the West Valley Fire
and Rescue offices located at 10000
Zier Road, Yakima.

At the meeting, WDFW staff members
will review the wildlife area's
history, discuss the planning process
and ask for public comments.

As the new management plan is
developed, the department will
consider input from the public as
well as feedback and guidance from
the Oak Creek Wildlife Area advisory
committee, Sprague said. The advisory
committee consists of citizens and
stakeholders who review and provide
input on wildlife area management
activities.

Information on the wildlife area's
three units is available on WDFW's
website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lands/wildlife_are
as/oak_creek/

There will be additional
opportunities for public input,
including at upcoming advisory
committee meetings and when the draft
plan is developed.

The department is revising management
plans for its 33 wildlife areas to
reflect current conditions and
identify new priorities and
initiatives, Sprague said. WDFW also
is updating the management plans for
Sinlahekin and Scotch Creek wildlife
areas in Okanogan County, Klickitat
Wildlife Area in Klickitat County,
and Snoqualmie Wildlife Area in King
and Snohomish counties.

For more

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Spring chinook fishing extension split between May, June on lower Columbia OLYMPIA Anglers fishing the lower Columbia River can catch and keep spring chinook salmon for four more days in May including Memorial Day weekend and up to 13 days in June under an agreement reached today by fishery managers from Washington and Oregon. Under that agreement, the fishery below Bonneville Dam will reopen May 27-30, close for three days, then reopen June 3-15, or until the annual harvest guideline is met. Ron Roler, Columbia River policy advisor for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), said the final days of this year's spring chinook season were designed to stretch the fishery until mid-June, when the summer salmon season gets under way. "A lot of anglers have asked that we structure the spring chinook season so that it dovetails with the summer fishing season, beginning June 16," Roler said. "The fishing schedule approved today offers a good chance of reaching that goal." This year's fishing season is based on a projected return of 180,000 upriver adult spring chinook and an annual catch guideline of 10,370 fish below Bonneville Dam. As before, the fishery will be open from the Tongue Point/Rocky Point line upriver to Beacon Rock for boat anglers, with bank fishing allowed up to the deadline below the dam. Anglers are limited to one adult hatchery chinook salmon as part of their daily limit of two adult fish. Fishing for hatchery steelhead will also be open concurrent with the salmon fishery. Any chinook or steelhead with an intact adipose fin must be released unharmed. All sockeye salmon incepted before June 16 must also be released. Under existing rules, anglers may retain hatchery steelhead and hatchery chinook jacks May 31 through June 2 when the mainstem Columbia from the Rocky Point/Tongue Point line upstream to the I-5 Bridge is closed for adult chinook retention. Shad fishing is open above and below Bonneville Dam. Fishery managers now anticipate a return of 180,000 upriver spring chinook to the Columbia River this year, down from 188,800 projected prior to the season. Salmon and steelhead fishing remains closed above Bonneville Dam but reopens for the summer chinook season June 16 in waters above and below the dam under rules outlined in the Washington Sport Fishing rules pamphlet (http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/). Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. - 5:00 p.m. 5/24/2016
Spring chinook fishing extension
split
between May, June on lower Columbia

OLYMPIA Anglers fishing the lower
Columbia River can catch and keep
spring chinook salmon for four more
days in May including Memorial Day
weekend and up to 13 days in June
under an agreement reached today by
fishery managers from Washington and
Oregon.

Under that agreement, the fishery
below Bonneville Dam will reopen May
27-30, close for three days, then
reopen June 3-15, or until the annual
harvest guideline is met.

Ron Roler, Columbia River policy
advisor for the Washington Department
of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), said the
final days of this year's spring
chinook season were designed to
stretch the fishery until mid-June,
when the summer salmon season gets
under way.

"A lot of anglers have asked that we
structure the spring chinook season
so that it dovetails with the summer
fishing season, beginning June 16,"
Roler said. "The fishing schedule
approved today offers a good chance
of reaching that goal."

This year's fishing season is based
on a projected return of 180,000
upriver adult spring chinook and an
annual catch guideline of 10,370 fish
below Bonneville Dam.

As before, the fishery will be open
from the Tongue Point/Rocky Point
line upriver to Beacon Rock for boat
anglers, with bank fishing allowed up
to the deadline below the dam.

Anglers are limited to one adult
hatchery chinook salmon as part of
their daily limit of two adult fish.
Fishing for hatchery steelhead will
also be open concurrent with the
salmon fishery.

Any chinook or steelhead with an
intact adipose fin must be released
unharmed. All sockeye salmon incepted
before June 16 must also be released.

Under existing rules, anglers may
retain hatchery steelhead and
hatchery chinook jacks May 31 through
June 2 when the mainstem Columbia
from the Rocky Point/Tongue Point
line upstream to the I-5 Bridge is
closed for adult chinook retention.
Shad fishing is open above and below
Bonneville Dam.

Fishery managers now anticipate a
return of 180,000 upriver spring
chinook to the Columbia River this
year, down from 188,800 projected
prior to the season.

Salmon and steelhead fishing remains
closed above Bonneville Dam but
reopens for the summer chinook season
June 16 in waters above and below the
dam under rules outlined in the
Washington Sport Fishing rules
pamphlet
(http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulatio
ns/).

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Viewing Fishing Reports 31-40 (118 reports)

Previous Page        Page # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10         Next Page

For fishing pictures go to LewisRiver.com monthy fishing pictures.
For more information go to Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Call 1.800.547.1501 for updated reservoir levels and estimated river flow below Merwin.
For N. F . Lewis River flow go to River Flows At Ariel.
For East Fork Lewis River flow go to East Fork Lewis River Near Heisson, Wa.

Stream flow and reservoir levels at:
Lewis River at Woodland       Speelyai Creek      Muddy Creek
Lewis River at Ariel      Lewis River Reservoir Levels

We are very pleased to offer you this fishing report site. Please only post reports or information that is of interest to all. Many people want a fast report and don't have time to read a lot of other stuff. Inappropriate posts will be deleted. Thanks, Noel Johnson.

Back to the
LewisRiver.com Fishing Page

Click here for Kress Lake - Click here for Merrill Lake
Click here for Horseshoe Lake - Click here for Klineline Ponds
Click here for Coldwater Lake - Click here for Silver Lake
Click here for Battle Ground Lake - Click here for Kalama River

WoodlandApe CaveArtsBirdsBusinessesCampingCatsChurchesCitiesCitizens
Day TripsDogsEast ForkExperience WAThe FallsFishingGarden
Gifford PinchotGrist MillHistoryHorsesHuntingLelooskaLilacsLinks
Merrill LakeMotorcyclesMt. AdamsMt. St. Helens
NewsPresentationsRecreationSummer VacationSW WA EventsTourismTreesTulips

Loading

LewisRiver.com

Web site owned by NWNature.com Inc. Inquiries to Noel Johnson.

Site maintained by Farnell Web Design