LewisRiver.com Fishing Reports

Watch LewisRiver.com's 10th Anniversary Video!

Click here to buy a Washington Fishing Licence


Click here for high water information.

Scroll down to fishing reports.

Click here for Gone Catchin Guide Service.
Click above for Gone Catchin Guide Service.

Click here for Lewis River RV Park and Country Store.
Click above for Lewis River RV Park and Country Store.

Click here to go to Harpers Tackle & Outdoor.
Click above to go to Harpers Tackle & Outdoor.

Click here to go to Gilliano's Pizza and Ice Cream Parlor.
Click above to go to page with $3.00 off coupon.

Take a safe boating course and get your Washington boat license to increase your fishing success.

Phone number to report snaggers Toll-Free at 1-877-933-9847. More info, click here.

Click here for information on when runs of fish enter the North Fork Lewis.

Click here for current fish counts over the Columbia River dams.

River Access Below Merwin Dam

You are currently viewing the Fishing Reports
[ Submit a Report ]

Viewing Fishing Reports 31-40 (85 reports)

Previous Page        Page # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9         Next Page

Heart Lake fishing closure for Kids Fishing event Action: Closes Heart Lake to fishing by the public. Effective dates: June 1 through June 5, 2016. The lake is open only to for youth anglers participating in the Kids Fishing event scheduled June 4 from 6 a.m. to noon. Youth anglers will be allowed to fish after the event for the remainder of the day Species affected: All gamefish. Location: Heart Lake, located within the city limits of Anacortes in Skagit County Reasons for action: This rule change is necessary to ensure a successful Kids Fishing event. The fish will be planted in the lake two days prior to the event to acclimate them. On the day of the event, only children 14 years of age or less will be allowed to fish in the lake. Other information: The Kids Fishing event has been sponsored by the City of Anacortes Parks and Recreation and the Fidalgo-San Juan Chapter of the Puget Sound Anglers for more than 20 years. The event offers children an opportunity to participate and learn about fishing who might otherwise not get the chance. For all participants a free barbeque will be provided. For information on how you can participate, please contact Nicole Johnston, city of Anacortes Parks and Recreation at (360) 293-1918, or Steve Stout, Puget Sound Anglers at (425) 345-9577. Information contact: Brett Barkdull, 360-466-4345 ext. 270 barkdbcb@dfw.wa.gov - 3:32 p.m. 4/26/2016
Heart Lake fishing closure for Kids
Fishing event

Action: Closes Heart Lake to fishing
by the public.

Effective dates: June 1 through June
5, 2016.

The lake is open only to for youth
anglers participating in the Kids
Fishing event scheduled June 4 from 6
a.m. to noon. Youth anglers will be
allowed to fish after the event for
the remainder of the day

Species affected: All gamefish.

Location: Heart Lake, located within
the city limits of Anacortes in
Skagit County

Reasons for action: This rule change
is necessary to ensure a successful
Kids Fishing event. The fish will be
planted in the lake two days prior to
the event to acclimate them. On the
day of the event, only children 14
years of age or less will be allowed
to fish in the lake.

Other information: The Kids Fishing
event has been sponsored by the City
of Anacortes Parks and Recreation and
the Fidalgo-San Juan Chapter of the
Puget Sound Anglers for more than 20
years. The event offers children an
opportunity to participate and learn
about fishing who might otherwise not
get the chance. For all participants
a free barbeque will be provided. For
information on how you can
participate, please contact Nicole
Johnston, city of Anacortes Parks and
Recreation at (360) 293-1918, or
Steve Stout, Puget Sound Anglers at
(425) 345-9577.

Information contact: Brett Barkdull,
360-466-4345 ext. 270
barkdbcb@dfw.wa.gov


Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

State's fisher recovery efforts help to avert federal ESA listing OLYMPIA – They look like weasels, prey on porcupines, and vanished from Washington state's forestlands more than 70 years ago. But now the fisher, a stocky woodland mammal the size of a large house cat, is making a comeback. With the support of private forest landowners, federal agencies, and conservation organizations, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is leading an effort to reestablish the reclusive species in its native habitat. Since 2008, WDFW and its partners have relocated a total of 113 fishers from British Columbia to federal forestlands in Olympic National Park and, more recently, the southern Cascade Mountains. State biologists confirmed the first sighting of newborn fishers in Olympic National Park in 2009, a year after releasing the first group of 18 transplants. Using radio collars, remote cameras and DNA analysis, state biologists have documented at least two generations of descendants from the 90 fishers relocated to the park during a three-year period ending in 2010. Last winter, the department expanded its reintroduction efforts to the southern Cascades with the release of 23 fishers south of Mount Rainier. The reintroduction plan calls for releasing a total of 160 fishers throughout the Cascade Range by 2018. Penny Becker, WDFW wildlife diversity division manager, said the department is currently conducting aerial surveys to monitor the recent transplants, which were fitted with radio transmitters prior to their release. "We know the fisher population in the Olympic National Park is reproducing and expanding geographically," Becker said. "We have high hopes for the new group in the south Cascades, and this is our first opportunity to see how they're doing." The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) recently praised fisher conservation programs in Washington, Oregon and California after a year-long review to determine whether fisher populations in those states should be listed as "threatened" under the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA). On April 14, USFWS announced that such a listing is "not necessary at this time," partly due to "proactive fisher conservation measures" such as Washington's fisher reintroduction program. USFWS also endorsed Washington's leadership in sponsoring voluntary programs that provide an incentive for forest landowners to work as partners in the recovery effort. Under a federal program called "Candidate Conservation Agreements with Assurances" (CCAA), landowners who adopt specified conservation measures will not be subject to any additional land restrictions if fishers are ever listed for protection under the ESA. Those measures - 4:18 p.m. 4/25/2016
State's fisher recovery efforts help
to avert federal ESA listing

OLYMPIA – They look like weasels,
prey on porcupines, and vanished from
Washington state's forestlands more
than 70 years ago.

But now the fisher, a stocky woodland
mammal the size of a large house cat,
is making a comeback. With the
support of private forest landowners,
federal agencies, and conservation
organizations, the Washington
Department of Fish and Wildlife
(WDFW) is leading an effort to
reestablish the reclusive species in
its native habitat.

Since 2008, WDFW and its partners
have relocated a total of 113 fishers
from British Columbia to federal
forestlands in Olympic National Park
and, more recently, the southern
Cascade Mountains.

State biologists confirmed the first
sighting of newborn fishers in
Olympic National Park in 2009, a year
after releasing the first group of 18
transplants. Using radio collars,
remote cameras and DNA analysis,
state biologists have documented at
least two generations of descendants
from the 90 fishers relocated to the
park during a three-year period
ending in 2010.

Last winter, the department expanded
its reintroduction efforts to the
southern Cascades with the release of
23 fishers south of Mount Rainier.
The reintroduction plan calls for
releasing a total of 160 fishers
throughout the Cascade Range by 2018.

Penny Becker, WDFW wildlife diversity
division manager, said the department
is currently conducting aerial
surveys to monitor the recent
transplants, which were fitted with
radio transmitters prior to their
release.

"We know the fisher population in the
Olympic National Park is reproducing
and expanding geographically," Becker
said. "We have high hopes for the new
group in the south Cascades, and this
is our first opportunity to see how
they're doing."

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
(USFWS) recently praised fisher
conservation programs in Washington,
Oregon and California after a year-
long review to determine whether
fisher populations in those states
should be listed as "threatened"
under the federal Endangered Species
Act (ESA).

On April 14, USFWS announced that
such a listing is "not necessary at
this time," partly due to "proactive
fisher conservation measures" such as
Washington's fisher reintroduction
program.

USFWS also endorsed Washington's
leadership in sponsoring voluntary
programs that provide an incentive
for forest landowners to work as
partners in the recovery effort.
Under a federal program called
"Candidate Conservation Agreements
with Assurances" (CCAA), landowners
who adopt specified conservation
measures will not be subject to any
additional land restrictions if
fishers are ever listed for
protection under the ESA.

Those measures

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Good - 7:53 a.m. 4/24/2016
Thanks for the info. We need good simple
reports like that more often. Thanks again
good luck steelin. BD

Bd - Couv wa
Bd

?????????? - 4:25 p.m. 4/23/2016
HI!
My friends and I have still been catching good numbers of Steelhead. I wish they'd open it for Springers, but From what we hear, neither the Lewis or the Kalama are getting any in anyway. So the Steelhead are still the name of the game at the hatchery and at Johnson Creek.

I hope you have good luck Mr. ? :)

Tight fishing lines Guys!

Doug

Douglas Bradford - Portland, OR

???????? - 10:00 a.m. 4/22/2016
Anything going on on the lewis? I
appreciate all the state info, but the site is
called lewis river fishing reports. Noel, do
you fish? How have you been doing?
Anybody, anybody!?

raif hernandez - yacolt

Snake River spring chinook fisheries to open Action: Spring chinook salmon fishing opens on the Snake River. Species affected: Chinook salmon. Locations: Below Ice Harbor Dam: Snake River from the Southbound Highway 12 Bridge near Pasco upstream about 7 miles to the fishing restriction boundary below Ice Harbor Dam. Below Little Goose Dam: Snake River from Texas Rapids boat launch (south side of the river upstream from the mouth of the Tucannon River) to the fishing restriction boundary below Little Goose Dam. This zone includes the rock and concrete area between the juvenile bypass return pipe and Little Goose Dam along the south shoreline of the facility (includes the walkway area locally known as “the Wall” in front of the juvenile collection facility). Clarkston: Snake River from the downstream edge of the large power lines crossing the Snake River (just upstream from West Evans Road on the south shore) upstream about 3.5 miles to the Washington state line (from the east levee of the Greenbelt boat launch in Clarkston northwest across the Snake River to the WA/ID boundary waters marker on the Whitman County shore). Dates: Each area is open two days per week until further notice. Area A (Below Ice Harbor Dam) open Friday, April 29, and will be open only Friday and Saturday each week. Areas B and C (below Little Goose Dam and near Clarkston) open Sunday, May 1, and will be open only Sunday and Monday each week. Daily Limits: 6 hatchery chinook (adipose fin clipped), of which no more than one may be an adult chinook salmon. For all areas open for chinook salmon harvest, anglers must cease fishing for salmon when the hatchery adult limit has been retained for the day. Reason for action: The pre-season forecast indicates a relatively strong return of spring chinook and anglers have stressed their desire for a longer fishery season. For this reason, Snake River fisheries in each zone will be limited to two days per week (with only one weekend day included each week) with a daily bag limit of one adult hatchery chinook. These restrictions will help prolong the duration of the season, enable sharing of fishing opportunities with upriver fishery zones, and facilitate compliance with Endangered Species Act (ESA) restrictions and harvest allocations available for the Snake River. Other Information: The minimum size of any retained chinook salmon is 12 inches. Jacks are less than 24 inches in length and adults are over 24 inches in length. The adipose fin-clipped chinook salmon that can be retained must have a healed scar at the location of the missing fin. All chinook salmon with an intact adipose fin, and all bull trout and steelhead, must be immediately released unharmed. In addition: Anglers must use barbless hooks when fishing for any species during the days of the week the salmon fishery is open in any area. Only single-point barbless hooks are allowed when fishing for sturgeon. A night closure is in effect for salmon and sturgeon. It is unlawful to use any hook larger than 5/8 inch (point of hook to shank) when fishing for all species except sturgeon. Anglers cannot remove any chinook salmon or steelhead from the water unless it is retained as part of the daily bag limit. Anglers are reminded to refer to the 2014/2015 Fishing in Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet for other regulations, including safety closures. Information contact: Jeremy Trump, District 3 Fish Biologist (509) 382-1005 Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. - 4:35 p.m. 4/20/2016
Snake River spring chinook fisheries
to open

Action: Spring chinook salmon fishing
opens on the Snake River.

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Locations:

Below Ice Harbor Dam: Snake River
from the Southbound Highway 12 Bridge
near Pasco upstream about 7 miles to
the fishing restriction boundary
below Ice Harbor Dam.
Below Little Goose Dam: Snake River
from Texas Rapids boat launch (south
side of the river upstream from the
mouth of the Tucannon River) to the
fishing restriction boundary below
Little Goose Dam. This zone includes
the rock and concrete area between
the juvenile bypass return pipe and
Little Goose Dam along the south
shoreline of the facility (includes
the walkway area locally known as
“the Wall” in front of the juvenile
collection facility).
Clarkston: Snake River from the
downstream edge of the large power
lines crossing the Snake River (just
upstream from West Evans Road on the
south shore) upstream about 3.5 miles
to the Washington state line (from
the east levee of the Greenbelt boat
launch in Clarkston northwest across
the Snake River to the WA/ID boundary
waters marker on the Whitman County
shore).
Dates: Each area is open two days per
week until further notice.

Area A (Below Ice Harbor Dam) open
Friday, April 29, and will be open
only Friday and Saturday each week.
Areas B and C (below Little Goose Dam
and near Clarkston) open Sunday, May
1, and will be open only Sunday and
Monday each week.
Daily Limits: 6 hatchery chinook
(adipose fin clipped), of which no
more than one may be an adult chinook
salmon. For all areas open for
chinook salmon harvest, anglers must
cease fishing for salmon when the
hatchery adult limit has been
retained for the day.

Reason for action: The pre-season
forecast indicates a relatively
strong return of spring chinook and
anglers have stressed their desire
for a longer fishery season. For this
reason, Snake River fisheries in each
zone will be limited to two days per
week (with only one weekend day
included each week) with a daily bag
limit of one adult hatchery chinook.
These restrictions will help prolong
the duration of the season, enable
sharing of fishing opportunities with
upriver fishery zones, and facilitate
compliance with Endangered Species
Act (ESA) restrictions and harvest
allocations available for the Snake
River.

Other Information: The minimum size
of any retained chinook salmon is 12
inches. Jacks are less than 24
inches in length and adults are over
24 inches in length. The adipose fin-
clipped chinook salmon that can be
retained must have a healed scar at
the location of the missing fin. All
chinook salmon with an intact adipose
fin, and all bull trout and
steelhead, must be immediately
released unharmed.

In addition: Anglers must use
barbless hooks when fishing for any
species during the days of the week
the salmon fishery is open in any
area. Only single-point barbless
hooks are allowed when fishing for
sturgeon. A night closure is in
effect for salmon and sturgeon. It is
unlawful to use any hook larger than
5/8 inch (point of hook to shank)
when fishing for all species except
sturgeon. Anglers cannot remove any
chinook salmon or steelhead from the
water unless it is retained as part
of the daily bag limit.

Anglers are reminded to refer to the
2014/2015 Fishing in Washington Sport
Fishing Rules pamphlet for other
regulations, including safety
closures.

Information contact: Jeremy Trump,
District 3 Fish Biologist (509) 382-
1005

Fishers must have a current
Washington fishing license,
appropriate to the fishery. Check the
WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules
pamphlet for details on fishing
seasons and regulations. Fishing
rules are subject to change. Check
the WDFW Fishing hotline for the
latest rule information at (360) 902-
2500, press 2 for recreational rules.
For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline
call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-
866-880-5431.
Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

WDFW hatcheries releasing steelhead under newly approved federal permits OLYMPIA – State fishery managers have begun releasing more than 500,000 juvenile steelhead from five state fish hatcheries into Puget Sound rivers after receiving word from NOAA-Fisheries that those facilities meet federal environmental standards. For the past two years, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has released steelhead from those five hatcheries into area lakes to ensure they wouldn’t interfere with wild steelhead protected by the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA). That action resulted from a legal agreement with the Wild Fish Conservancy, which stipulated that WDFW would not release steelhead smolts into area rivers until NOAA-Fisheries determined that its hatchery operations comply with the federal law. Now that WDFW has received the necessary federal permits, the department is again releasing smolts that will migrate to the ocean and return as adult steelhead after two years, said Kelly Cunningham, deputy assistant director of WDFW’s Fish Program. “We are pleased that NOAA-Fisheries agrees our hatchery plans are scientifically sound,” Cunningham said. “This means that we can again produce fish for harvest in fisheries throughout Puget Sound.” WDFW hatcheries in northern Puget Sound currently releasing hatchery smolts include: Wallace Creek, 27,600 Reiter Ponds, 140,000 Whitehorse, 130,000 Kendall Creek, 150,000 Tokul Creek, 74,000 NOAA-Fisheries also approved a permit allowing the Dungeness Hatchery to release 10,000 steelhead smolts on the Olympic Peninsula, but those releases will take place in mid-May due to the timing of the run, Cunningham said. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. - 10:14 a.m. 4/19/2016
WDFW hatcheries releasing steelhead
under newly approved federal permits

OLYMPIA – State fishery managers have
begun releasing more than 500,000
juvenile steelhead from five state
fish hatcheries into Puget Sound
rivers after receiving word from
NOAA-Fisheries that those facilities
meet federal environmental standards.

For the past two years, the
Washington Department of Fish and
Wildlife (WDFW) has released
steelhead from those five hatcheries
into area lakes to ensure they
wouldn’t interfere with wild
steelhead protected by the federal
Endangered Species Act (ESA).

That action resulted from a legal
agreement with the Wild Fish
Conservancy, which stipulated that
WDFW would not release steelhead
smolts into area rivers until NOAA-
Fisheries determined that its
hatchery operations comply with the
federal law.

Now that WDFW has received the
necessary federal permits, the
department is again releasing smolts
that will migrate to the ocean and
return as adult steelhead after two
years, said Kelly Cunningham, deputy
assistant director of WDFW’s Fish
Program.

“We are pleased that NOAA-Fisheries
agrees our hatchery plans are
scientifically sound,” Cunningham
said. “This means that we can again
produce fish for harvest in fisheries
throughout Puget Sound.”

WDFW hatcheries in northern Puget
Sound currently releasing hatchery
smolts include:

Wallace Creek, 27,600
Reiter Ponds, 140,000
Whitehorse, 130,000
Kendall Creek, 150,000
Tokul Creek, 74,000
NOAA-Fisheries also approved a permit
allowing the Dungeness Hatchery to
release 10,000 steelhead smolts on
the Olympic Peninsula, but those
releases will take place in mid-May
due to the timing of the run,
Cunningham said.

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Lance Fisher - 1:45 p.m. 4/17/2016
I have been seeing lots more fish going over
the dam. I'm guessing Lance Fisher hasn't
been fishing then. Normally he determines
how many go over buy how trips a day he
fish's

Gary Gaymore - Woodland
Ggmore@yahoo.com

Columbia Park Pond to close for Kids’ Fishing Day events Action: Closes Columbia Park Pond to all fishing except those youths registered for the “Special Needs Fishing Event” on Friday, May 6, or the “Kids' Fishing Day” event on Saturday, May 7. In addition, the daily limit is reduced to three trout during the events. Effective dates: 12:01 a.m. May 4, to 3:00 p.m. May 7, 2016. Species affected: All game fish. Location: Columbia Park Pond located within Columbia Park in Kennewick. Reasons for action: This rule change is necessary to ensure successful youth fishing events. Several thousand rainbow trout will be stocked up to three days prior to the events to ensure they will bite while the kids are fishing. During the two events, only those registered will be allowed to fish. Other information: The kids' fishing events have been held at Columbia Park Pond for the past 15 years. The events this year will bring out more than 1,400 registered youths and anglers with special needs to introduce them to the fun of fishing. The pond re-opens to the public on Saturday, May 7 at 3:01 p.m. Columbia Park Pond is open to fishing only by juvenile anglers (under 15 years old) and adults with a disability who have a designated harvester companion card. Information contact: Paul Hoffarth, WDFW District 4 Biologist (509-545-2284) Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for - 5:38 p.m. 4/15/2016
Columbia Park Pond to close for Kids’
Fishing Day events

Action: Closes Columbia Park Pond to
all fishing except those youths
registered for the “Special Needs
Fishing Event” on Friday, May 6, or
the “Kids' Fishing Day” event on
Saturday, May 7. In addition, the
daily limit is reduced to three trout
during the events.

Effective dates: 12:01 a.m. May 4, to
3:00 p.m. May 7, 2016.

Species affected: All game fish.

Location: Columbia Park Pond located
within Columbia Park in Kennewick.

Reasons for action: This rule change
is necessary to ensure successful
youth fishing events. Several
thousand rainbow trout will be
stocked up to three days prior to the
events to ensure they will bite while
the kids are fishing. During the two
events, only those registered will be
allowed to fish.

Other information: The kids' fishing
events have been held at Columbia
Park Pond for the past 15 years. The
events this year will bring out more
than 1,400 registered youths and
anglers with special needs to
introduce them to the fun of fishing.

The pond re-opens to the public on
Saturday, May 7 at 3:01 p.m. Columbia
Park Pond is open to fishing only by
juvenile anglers (under 15 years old)
and adults with a disability who have
a designated harvester companion
card.

Information contact: Paul Hoffarth,
WDFW District 4 Biologist (509-545-
2284)

Fishers must have a current
Washington fishing license,
appropriate to the fishery. Check the
WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules
pamphlet for details on fishing
seasons and regulations. Fishing
rules are subject to change. Check
the WDFW Fishing hotline for the
latest rule information at (360) 902-
2500, press 2 for

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Chehalis River spring chinook fishery opens April 16 Action: Opens Chehalis River to spring chinook fishing. Effective dates: 12:01 a.m. April 16 through 11:59 p.m. June 30, 2016. Location: Chehalis River, from the mouth (Hwy 101 Bridge) to the Hwy 6 Bridge in the town of Adna, Grays Harbor/Thurston/Lewis counties. Reason for action: This rule change opens a fishing opportunity recently agreed to by the state and coastal tribes during the salmon season-setting process. Other Information: Daily limit of one salmon. Trout and gamefish fisheries remain closed until the first day in June. Information Contact: Mike Scharpf, Region 6 (360) 249-1205. Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431. Persons with disabilities who - 5:36 p.m. 4/15/2016
Chehalis River spring chinook fishery
opens April 16

Action: Opens Chehalis River to
spring chinook fishing.

Effective dates: 12:01 a.m. April 16
through 11:59 p.m. June 30, 2016.

Location: Chehalis River, from the
mouth (Hwy 101 Bridge) to the Hwy 6
Bridge in the town of Adna, Grays
Harbor/Thurston/Lewis counties.

Reason for action: This rule change
opens a fishing opportunity recently
agreed to by the state and coastal
tribes during the salmon season-
setting process.

Other Information: Daily limit of
one salmon. Trout and gamefish
fisheries remain closed until the
first day in June.

Information Contact: Mike Scharpf,
Region 6 (360) 249-1205.

Fishers must have a current
Washington fishing license,
appropriate to the fishery. Check the
WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules
pamphlet for details on fishing
seasons and regulations. Fishing
rules are subject to change. Check
the WDFW Fishing hotline for the
latest rule information at (360) 902-
2500, press 2 for recreational rules.
For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline
call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-
866-880-5431.
Persons with disabilities who

Noel Johnson - Woodland, WA 98674
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Viewing Fishing Reports 31-40 (85 reports)

Previous Page        Page # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9         Next Page

For fishing pictures go to LewisRiver.com monthy fishing pictures.
For more information go to Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Call 1.800.547.1501 for updated reservoir levels and estimated river flow below Merwin.
For N. F . Lewis River flow go to River Flows At Ariel.
For East Fork Lewis River flow go to East Fork Lewis River Near Heisson, Wa.

Stream flow and reservoir levels at:
Lewis River at Woodland       Speelyai Creek      Muddy Creek
Lewis River at Ariel      Lewis River Reservoir Levels

We are very pleased to offer you this fishing report site. Please only post reports or information that is of interest to all. Many people want a fast report and don't have time to read a lot of other stuff. Inappropriate posts will be deleted. Thanks, Noel Johnson.

Back to the
LewisRiver.com Fishing Page

Click here for Kress Lake - Click here for Merrill Lake
Click here for Horseshoe Lake - Click here for Klineline Ponds
Click here for Coldwater Lake - Click here for Silver Lake
Click here for Battle Ground Lake - Click here for Kalama River

WoodlandApe CaveArtsBirdsBusinessesCampingCatsChurchesCitiesCitizens
Day TripsDogsEast ForkExperience WAThe FallsFishingGarden
Gifford PinchotGrist MillHistoryHorsesHuntingLelooskaLilacsLinks
Merrill LakeMotorcyclesMt. AdamsMt. St. Helens
NewsPresentationsRecreationSummer VacationSW WA EventsTourismTreesTulips

Loading

LewisRiver.com

Web site owned by NWNature.com Inc. Inquiries to Noel Johnson.

Site maintained by Farnell Web Design