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Hatchery report - 3:15 p.m. 9/4/2017
Has anyone heard if there even is a run of
silvers we just went to the hatchery there was
2 people fishing and no fish jumping is this
going to be a terrible fish year for the Lewis
thanks for any info have a great day still
hoping for fish lol

Phil Thompson - Vancouver,washington
Thompsonphilly@yahoo.com

Chinook - 3:49 p.m. 9/1/2017
Went 4 for 7 and came home with limit
of hatchery Chinook in 2hrs. Eggs!
Eggs! Eggs! I was at my "secret spot"
on the river. Not many fish higher up
yet.

Nick - Wa
Stubs1361@gmail.com

Online report offers insights into upcoming hunting seasons OLYMPIA With hunting seasons for deer, elk, waterfowl and upland game birds set to get underway in September, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has issued its annual online guide to hunting opportunities throughout the state. WDFW's Hunting Prospects report, available at http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/prospects/, provides updated information about game populations, hunting rules and land access in every game-management district in the state. "This report was compiled by local wildlife biologists to help hunters succeed in the field," said Anis Aoude, WDFW game division manager. "Whether you're a seasoned hunter or just getting started, you'll likely find some helpful information in Hunting Prospects." State game managers expect another good year of hunting, although hunters can expect new restrictions on deer and elk hunts in some areas due to the harsh conditions last winter. Meanwhile, hunting prospects for gamebirds are looking up, according to the report. "This last winter was one of the tougher ones we've seen in recent years, and we have to give the herds particularly those east of the Cascades some time to rebuild," Aoude said. "Fortunately, most Washington deer and elk benefitted from a previous string of mild winters, so the affected herds are only slightly below our population objectives." Late spring rains also delayed nesting for doves and some other upland game birds, but observations in the field indicate a good hatch this year, said Kyle Spragens, WDFW waterfowl manager. Especially encouraging is the boom in the state's waterfowl populations, which have rebounded from the drought of 2015, Spragens said. Among the various species of ducks and geese that breed in Washington state, Canada geese are up by 17 percent, mallards are up by 74 percent and wood ducks are up by 76 percent from last year. "This year's long, wet spring was a boon to waterfowl in our state," Spragens said. "Those local birds will be the focus of hunters' attention until northern birds arrive later in the year from Canada and Alaska." Aoude asks that hunters pay special attention to several new rules that will take effect this year: Youth-only hunts: The traditional bird hunt for hunters under age 16 has been split between two weekends this year, providing more options for them and the non-hunting parents, guardians and mentors who accompany them. The youth hunt for waterfowl is scheduled Sept. 16-17, followed by the youth hunt for pheasant and other upland game birds Sept. 23-24. Goose bag limits: Starting Oct. 14, hunters in most areas will be allowed to take up to six white geese and 10 white-fronted geese in addition to their limit of four Canada per day. The change reflects the large number of white geese on the northern breeding grounds. Special deer hunts: Youth hunters and hunters with disabilities can hunt any deer in Game Management Units (GMU) 101, 105, 108, 111, 113, 117, and 121 from Oct. 14-15 and Oct. 21-22 during the modern firearm general season. Hoof disease precaution: Several units have been added to the list of GMUs where hunters are required to remove and leave behind the hooves of harvested elk to reduce the spread of elk hoof disease. Those units include GMUs 633 and 636 in Mason County, and 407, 418, 437, and 454 in north Puget Sound. These and other hunting regulations are described in WDFW's Big Game Hunting pamphlet or Migratory Waterfowl and Upland Game pamphlets, available at http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/regulations/ However, for an overview of how those hunting seasons are shaping up in specific areas of the state, Aoude recommends checking the Hunting Prospects report. "Most serious hunters are eager to get all the information they can before they go afield," Aoude said. "The Hunting Prospects are designed to fill that demand." Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list. Visit the WDFW News Release Archive at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/ To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html - 8:44 a.m. 8/31/2017
Online report offers insights into
upcoming hunting seasons

OLYMPIA With hunting seasons for
deer, elk, waterfowl and upland game
birds set to get underway in
September, the Washington Department
of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has
issued its annual online guide to
hunting opportunities throughout the
state.

WDFW's Hunting Prospects report,
available at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/prospects/
, provides updated information about
game populations, hunting rules and
land access in every game-management
district in the state.

"This report was compiled by local
wildlife biologists to help hunters
succeed in the field," said Anis
Aoude, WDFW game division manager.
"Whether you're a seasoned hunter or
just getting started, you'll likely
find some helpful information in
Hunting Prospects."

State game managers expect another
good year of hunting, although
hunters can expect new restrictions
on deer and elk hunts in some areas
due to the harsh conditions last
winter. Meanwhile, hunting prospects
for gamebirds are looking up,
according to the report.

"This last winter was one of the
tougher ones we've seen in recent
years, and we have to give the herds
particularly those east of the
Cascades some time to rebuild,"
Aoude said. "Fortunately, most
Washington deer and elk benefitted
from a previous string of mild
winters, so the affected herds are
only slightly below our population
objectives."

Late spring rains also delayed
nesting for doves and some other
upland game birds, but observations
in the field indicate a good hatch
this year, said Kyle Spragens, WDFW
waterfowl manager.

Especially encouraging is the boom in
the state's waterfowl populations,
which have rebounded from the drought
of 2015, Spragens said. Among the
various species of ducks and geese
that breed in Washington state,
Canada geese are up by 17 percent,
mallards are up by 74 percent and
wood ducks are up by 76 percent from
last year.

"This year's long, wet spring was a
boon to waterfowl in our state,"
Spragens said. "Those local birds
will be the focus of hunters'
attention until northern birds arrive
later in the year from Canada and
Alaska."

Aoude asks that hunters pay special
attention to several new rules that
will take effect this year:

Youth-only hunts: The traditional
bird hunt for hunters under age 16
has been split between two weekends
this year, providing more options for
them and the non-hunting parents,
guardians and mentors who accompany
them. The youth hunt for waterfowl is
scheduled Sept. 16-17, followed by
the youth hunt for pheasant and other
upland game birds Sept. 23-24.


Goose bag limits: Starting Oct. 14,
hunters in most areas will be allowed
to take up to six white geese and 10
white-fronted geese in addition to
their limit of four Canada per day.
The change reflects the large number
of white geese on the northern
breeding grounds.


Special deer hunts: Youth hunters and
hunters with disabilities can hunt
any deer in Game Management Units
(GMU) 101, 105, 108, 111, 113, 117,
and 121 from Oct. 14-15 and Oct. 21-
22 during the modern firearm general
season.


Hoof disease precaution: Several
units have been added to the list of
GMUs where hunters are required to
remove and leave behind the hooves of
harvested elk to reduce the spread of
elk hoof disease. Those units include
GMUs 633 and 636 in Mason County, and
407, 418, 437, and 454 in north Puget
Sound.
These and other hunting regulations
are described in WDFW's Big Game
Hunting pamphlet or Migratory
Waterfowl and Upland Game pamphlets,
available at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/regulation
s/

However, for an overview of how those
hunting seasons are shaping up in
specific areas of the state, Aoude
recommends checking the Hunting
Prospects report.

"Most serious hunters are eager to
get all the information they can
before they go afield," Aoude said.
"The Hunting Prospects are designed
to fill that demand."

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to the
WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the WDFW News Release Archive
at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing
list:
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.
html

Noel E Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Most of Puget Sound closes to crabbing Sept. 4; summer catch reports due Oct. 1 OLYMPIA Most areas of Puget Sound will close to recreational crab fishing on Labor Day (Sept. 4), when anyone harvesting crab from a boat must retrieve their gear by one hour after sunset. Crabbers fishing from shore or from piers have until the end of the day on Sept. 4 to retrieve their gear. All sport fishers licensed to fish for Dungeness crab anywhere in Puget Sound have through Oct. 1 to submit summer catch reports to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The only two areas of the Sound that will remain open to crab fishing after Labor Day are marine areas 7-North and 7-South near the San Juan Islands. These two areas will remain open Thursdays through Mondays each week through Sept. 30. Sport fishers who crab in those two areas after Sept. 4 must record their catch on winter catch record cards, which are available at sporting goods stores and other license vendors across the state. Crabbers can submit summer catch record cards to WDFW by mail at CRC Unit, P.O. Box 43142, Olympia, WA 98504-3142. They can also report their catch online at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov/#/login from Sept. 5 through Oct. 1. Crabbers who fail to file their catch reports on time will face a $10 fine when they purchase a 2018 Puget Sound crab endorsement. "Catch reports play a major role in determining how much crab is still available for harvest during the winter season," said Bob Sizemore, WDFW's shellfish policy lead. "It's important that we receive reports from everyone licensed to fish for crab in Puget Sound - whether or not they caught crab this year." Sizemore said WDFW will announce winter crab seasons for Puget Sound in early October, after completing its assessment of the summer fishery. For more information about recreational crabbing in Puget Sound, see WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/crab/ Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. - 8:42 a.m. 8/31/2017
Most of Puget Sound closes to
crabbing Sept. 4; summer catch
reports due Oct. 1

OLYMPIA Most areas of Puget Sound
will close to recreational crab
fishing on Labor Day (Sept. 4), when
anyone harvesting crab from a boat
must retrieve their gear by one hour
after sunset.

Crabbers fishing from shore or from
piers have until the end of the day
on Sept. 4 to retrieve their gear.

All sport fishers licensed to fish
for Dungeness crab anywhere in Puget
Sound have through Oct. 1 to submit
summer catch reports to the
Washington Department of Fish and
Wildlife (WDFW).

The only two areas of the Sound that
will remain open to crab fishing
after Labor Day are marine areas 7-
North and 7-South near the San Juan
Islands. These two areas will remain
open Thursdays through Mondays each
week through Sept. 30. Sport fishers
who crab in those two areas after
Sept. 4 must record their catch on
winter catch record cards, which are
available at sporting goods stores
and other license vendors across the
state.

Crabbers can submit summer catch
record cards to WDFW by mail at CRC
Unit, P.O. Box 43142, Olympia, WA
98504-3142. They can also report
their catch online at
https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov/#/login
from Sept. 5 through Oct. 1.

Crabbers who fail to file their catch
reports on time will face a $10 fine
when they purchase a 2018 Puget Sound
crab endorsement.

"Catch reports play a major role in
determining how much crab is still
available for harvest during the
winter season," said Bob Sizemore,
WDFW's shellfish policy lead. "It's
important that we receive reports
from everyone licensed to fish for
crab in Puget Sound - whether or not
they caught crab this year."

Sizemore said WDFW will announce
winter crab seasons for Puget Sound
in early October, after completing
its assessment of the summer fishery.

For more information about
recreational crabbing in Puget Sound,
see WDFW's website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/
crab/

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.

Noel E Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

OLYMPIA State salmon managers are encouraging anglers to fish for thousands of Atlantic salmon that escaped recently from a salmon farm near the San Juan Islands. Cooke Aquaculture notified the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) of a net pen failure on Aug. 19 that caused the release of Atlantic salmon from the Cypress Island location. About 305,000 salmon were in the net pen at the time, though the company initially estimated that only 4,000-5,000 fish have escaped. Cypress Island lies along Rosario Strait between Guemes and Blakely islands "Our first concern, of course, is to protect native fish species," said Ron Warren, head of WDFW's Fish Program. "So we'd like to see as many of these escaped fish caught as possible." Warren said there is no evidence that these fish pose a threat to native fish populations, either through disease or crossbreeding with Pacific salmon. To date, there is no record of Atlantic salmon successfully reproducing with Pacific salmon in Washington's waters, he said. "It will be some time before we know how many fish escaped the net pens," Warren said. "That's why we've authorized Cooke Aquaculture to fish with beach seine nets and we're encouraging anglers to go out and harvest these fish." The escaped fish are estimated to be eight to 10 pounds in size and are safe to eat. There is no size or catch limit on Atlantic salmon. However, anglers may only fish for Atlantic salmon in marine waters that are already open to fishing for Pacific salmon or freshwater areas open for trout fishing. Anglers also must stop fishing for Atlantic salmon once they've caught their daily limit of Pacific salmon. To help anglers identify Atlantic salmon, WDFW has posted a salmon identification guide on its webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/salmon/atlantic.html Anglers must have a current fishing license and must also observe gear regulations identified in the 2017-18 sport fishing rules pamphlet. Anglers do not have to report Atlantic salmon on their catch record cards. WDFW shares management authority with the state Department of Agriculture for monitoring fish diseases. Other state departments, local governments and tribal governments have authority related to the siting of marine aquaculture and water quality. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list. Visit the WDFW News Release Archive at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/ To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html - 6:53 a.m. 8/23/2017
OLYMPIA State salmon managers are
encouraging anglers to fish for
thousands of Atlantic salmon that
escaped recently from a salmon farm
near the San Juan Islands.

Cooke Aquaculture notified the
Washington Department of Fish and
Wildlife (WDFW) of a net pen failure
on Aug. 19 that caused the release of
Atlantic salmon from the Cypress
Island location. About 305,000 salmon
were in the net pen at the time,
though the company initially
estimated that only 4,000-5,000 fish
have escaped. Cypress Island lies
along Rosario Strait between Guemes
and Blakely islands

"Our first concern, of course, is to
protect native fish species," said
Ron Warren, head of WDFW's Fish
Program. "So we'd like to see as many
of these escaped fish caught as
possible."

Warren said there is no evidence that
these fish pose a threat to native
fish populations, either through
disease or crossbreeding with Pacific
salmon. To date, there is no record
of Atlantic salmon successfully
reproducing with Pacific salmon in
Washington's waters, he said.

"It will be some time before we know
how many fish escaped the net pens,"
Warren said. "That's why we've
authorized Cooke Aquaculture to fish
with beach seine nets and we're
encouraging anglers to go out and
harvest these fish."

The escaped fish are estimated to be
eight to 10 pounds in size and are
safe to eat.

There is no size or catch limit on
Atlantic salmon. However, anglers may
only fish for Atlantic salmon in
marine waters that are already open
to fishing for Pacific salmon or
freshwater areas open for trout
fishing. Anglers also must stop
fishing for Atlantic salmon once
they've caught their daily limit of
Pacific salmon.

To help anglers identify Atlantic
salmon, WDFW has posted a salmon
identification guide on its webpage
at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/salmon/atl
antic.html

Anglers must have a current fishing
license and must also observe gear
regulations identified in the 2017-18
sport fishing rules pamphlet. Anglers
do not have to report Atlantic salmon
on their catch record cards.

WDFW shares management authority with
the state Department of Agriculture
for monitoring fish diseases. Other
state departments, local governments
and tribal governments have authority
related to the siting of marine
aquaculture and water quality.

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to the
WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the WDFW News Release Archive
at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing
list:
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.
html

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Hows fishing - 3:21 p.m. 8/19/2017
Fishing jas been hit and miss. Most
success has been around the happa
area and about 50 50 clipped or not.
Good luck!
Eggs

Dave - Vancouver

fish in the river - 11:35 p.m. 8/15/2017
Hi guys i was wondering when i should start
expecting to see fish in the lewis river. I dont get out
much with my dad and wanted to go sometime in
late august to early september and was wondering if
the fish would be there. IF you got any info send me
an email and it would be greatly appreciated. Also if
the fish are fresh would it be best to throw jigs at
them or float eggs? or if I'm not getting it right what
bait should i use? Again, email me if you got some
info because i forget to check this website. Tight
lines to everyone and have a good day
-Aaron

aaron m - vancouver washington
tommygunmanrex@gmail.com

Fishing - 9:04 p.m. 8/8/2017
Hows fishing.

Tyler Carlson - BATTLE GROUND
tj-carlson@hotmail.com

Commission to discuss protective status of 4 species, roposed steps for reducing elk hoof disease OLYMPIA The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission will take public comment on a variety of issues including the protective status of four wildlife species and proposed steps to reduce elk hoof disease at a meeting Aug. 4-5 in Olympia. The commission, a citizen panel appointed by the governor to set policy for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), will convene in Room 172 of the Natural Resources Building at 1111 Washington St. SE in Olympia. The meeting is scheduled to begin at 8 a.m. both days. An agenda for the meeting is available at http://wdfw.wa.gov/commission/. The commission will take public comment on WDFW's recommendations to list yellow-billed cuckoos as an endangered species in Washington and elevate the level of state protection for loggerhead sea turtles from threatened to endangered. In 2014, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service distinguished the cuckoo in western North America as a distinct population and listed it as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act. The north Pacific population of loggerhead sea turtles has declined substantially since the last half of the 20th century. The commission is expected to make a decision on the status of these two species at its meeting in September. During the August meeting, commissioners will consider WDFW's recommendations to keep leatherback sea turtles listed as a state endangered species and green sea turtles listed as state threatened species. Neither shows significant signs of recovery. In other action, commissioners also will hear a proposal from wildlife managers to require hunters to remove and leave behind the hooves of any elk harvested in six game management units in an effort to reduce the spread of elk hoof disease, a debilitating bacterial disease. WDFW already requires these precautions in many management units in southwest Washington. The new proposal adds two management units in Mason County as well as four in north Puget Sound, where WDFW recently confirmed the presence of elk hoof disease. Wildlife managers additionally will ask commissioners to approve changes to regulations for auction, raffle or special incentive permits for hunting big game and wild turkeys. The proposed changes would clarify where permit holders can hunt and which animals can be legally hunted. In other business, the commission will hold a public hearing on proposed changes to spring bear hunting seasons. Those changes include reducing the number of permits available in the Long Beach area and expanding the hunting area near Copalis. Commissioners will also take public input on planned changes to Puget Sound clam and oyster seasons. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list. Visit the WDFW News Release Archive at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/ To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html - 8:28 a.m. 7/28/2017
Commission to discuss protective
status of 4 species,
roposed steps for reducing elk hoof
disease

OLYMPIA The Washington Fish and
Wildlife Commission will take public
comment on a variety of issues
including the protective status of
four wildlife species and proposed
steps to reduce elk hoof disease at a
meeting Aug. 4-5 in Olympia.

The commission, a citizen panel
appointed by the governor to set
policy for the Washington Department
of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), will
convene in Room 172 of the Natural
Resources Building at 1111 Washington
St. SE in Olympia. The meeting is
scheduled to begin at 8 a.m. both
days.

An agenda for the meeting is
available at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/commission/.

The commission will take public
comment on WDFW's recommendations to
list yellow-billed cuckoos as an
endangered species in Washington and
elevate the level of state protection
for loggerhead sea turtles from
threatened to endangered.

In 2014, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service distinguished the cuckoo in
western North America as a distinct
population and listed it as
threatened under the federal
Endangered Species Act. The north
Pacific population of loggerhead sea
turtles has declined substantially
since the last half of the 20th
century.

The commission is expected to make a
decision on the status of these two
species at its meeting in September.

During the August meeting,
commissioners will consider WDFW's
recommendations to keep leatherback
sea turtles listed as a state
endangered species and green sea
turtles listed as state threatened
species. Neither shows significant
signs of recovery.

In other action, commissioners also
will hear a proposal from wildlife
managers to require hunters to remove
and leave behind the hooves of any
elk harvested in six game management
units in an effort to reduce the
spread of elk hoof disease, a
debilitating bacterial disease. WDFW
already requires these precautions in
many management units in southwest
Washington. The new proposal adds two
management units in Mason County as
well as four in north Puget Sound,
where WDFW recently confirmed the
presence of elk hoof disease.

Wildlife managers additionally will
ask commissioners to approve changes
to regulations for auction, raffle or
special incentive permits for hunting
big game and wild turkeys. The
proposed changes would clarify where
permit holders can hunt and which
animals can be legally hunted.

In other business, the commission
will hold a public hearing on
proposed changes to spring bear
hunting seasons. Those changes
include reducing the number of
permits available in the Long Beach
area and expanding the hunting area
near Copalis.

Commissioners will also take public
input on planned changes to Puget
Sound clam and oyster seasons.

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to the
WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the WDFW News Release Archive
at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing
list:
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.
html

Noel E Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Daily limit for steelhead on Cowlitz River reduced, mandatory retention rule lifted Action: The daily limit will be reduced from 3 to 2 hatchery steelhead on the Cowlitz River upstream from the Lexington Drive/Sparks Road Bridge. Additionally, anglers will no longer be required to retain hatchery steelhead. Species affected: Steelhead Effective date: July 31, 2017, until further notice. Location: Cowlitz River and its tributaries from the Lexington Drive/Sparks Road Bridge to the Barrier Dam. Reason for action: Steelhead returns to the Columbia River have been lower than expected this summer. Low returns of summer steelhead to the Cowlitz Hatchery thus far this season make it necessary to reduce the daily limit as a precautionary measure to ensure enough fish can be collected to meet the hatchery broodstock needs. Retention of hatchery steelhead will no longer be required due to the need to obtain additional fish for the hatchery program. Other information: Daily limits may be adjusted at a later date based on updated hatchery return numbers. Current regulations to protect upriver steelhead, which are also returning in low numbers, still apply from the Cowlitz River mouth upstream to Lexington Drive/Sparks Road Bridge. These fish are known to use the lower Cowlitz as a thermal refuge from the warmer mainstem Columbia. Those regulations are: June 16 - Oct. 31 1 steelhead allowed in the adult salmonid daily limit except closed to steelhead retention Aug. 1-31. Night closure for all species. Information contact: (360) 696-6211. For latest information press *1010. Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431. - 8:25 a.m. 7/28/2017
Daily limit for steelhead on Cowlitz
River
reduced, mandatory retention rule
lifted

Action: The daily limit will be
reduced from 3 to 2 hatchery
steelhead on the Cowlitz River
upstream from the Lexington
Drive/Sparks Road Bridge.
Additionally, anglers will no longer
be required to retain hatchery
steelhead.

Species affected: Steelhead

Effective date: July 31, 2017, until
further notice.

Location: Cowlitz River and its
tributaries from the Lexington
Drive/Sparks Road Bridge to the
Barrier Dam.

Reason for action: Steelhead returns
to the Columbia River have been lower
than expected this summer. Low
returns of summer steelhead to the
Cowlitz Hatchery thus far this season
make it necessary to reduce the daily
limit as a precautionary measure to
ensure enough fish can be collected
to meet the hatchery broodstock
needs. Retention of hatchery
steelhead will no longer be required
due to the need to obtain additional
fish for the hatchery program.

Other information: Daily limits may
be adjusted at a later date based on
updated hatchery return numbers.

Current regulations to protect
upriver steelhead, which are also
returning in low numbers, still apply
from the Cowlitz River mouth upstream
to Lexington Drive/Sparks Road
Bridge. These fish are known to use
the lower Cowlitz as a thermal refuge
from the warmer mainstem Columbia.
Those regulations are:

June 16 - Oct. 31 1 steelhead
allowed in the adult salmonid daily
limit except closed to steelhead
retention Aug. 1-31.
Night closure for all species.
Information contact: (360) 696-6211.
For latest information press *1010.

Fishers must have a current
Washington fishing license,
appropriate to the fishery. Check the
WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules
pamphlet for details on fishing
seasons and regulations. Fishing
rules are subject to change. Check
the WDFW Fishing hotline for the
latest rule information at (360) 902-
2500, press 2 for recreational rules.
For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline
call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-
866-880-5431.

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

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