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August 26, 2016 Ocean salmon fishery off Ilwaco to close early Action: Marine Area 1 (Ilwaco) will close to salmon fishing at the end of the day Aug. 27. Effective Dates: 11:59 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 27. Species affected: All salmon. Locations: Marine Area 1 (Ilwaco); Leadbetter Point, Wash., to Cape Falcon, Oregon. Reason for action: Preliminary estimates indicate that anglers will reach the preseason coho quota of 18,900 by the end of the day Aug. 27. Closing the salmon fishery early will help ensure compliance with conservation objectives. Other information: The Buoy 10 fishery at the mouth of the Columbia River remains open as scheduled. For specific regulations, anglers should consult the 2016-17 fishing rules pamphlet, available online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/. Information Contact: Kyle Adicks, 360-902-2664. Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. - 2:54 p.m. 8/26/2016
August 26, 2016

Ocean salmon fishery off Ilwaco to
close early

Action: Marine Area 1 (Ilwaco) will
close to salmon fishing at the end of
the day Aug. 27.

Effective Dates: 11:59 p.m.,
Saturday, Aug. 27.

Species affected: All salmon.

Locations: Marine Area 1 (Ilwaco);
Leadbetter Point, Wash., to Cape
Falcon, Oregon.

Reason for action: Preliminary
estimates indicate that anglers will
reach the preseason coho quota of
18,900 by the end of the day Aug. 27.
Closing the salmon fishery early will
help ensure compliance with
conservation objectives.

Other information: The Buoy 10
fishery at the mouth of the Columbia
River remains open as scheduled. For
specific regulations, anglers should
consult the 2016-17 fishing rules
pamphlet, available online at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulation
s/.

Information Contact: Kyle Adicks,
360-902-2664.

Fishers must have a current
Washington fishing license,
appropriate to the fishery. Check the
WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules
pamphlet for details on fishing
seasons and regulations. Fishing
rules are subject to change. Check
the WDFW Fishing hotline for the
latest rule information at (360) 902-
2500, press 2 for recreational rules.
For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline
call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-
866-880-5431.
Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
August 26, 2016 Ocean salmon fishery off Ilwaco to close early Action: Marine Area 1 (Ilwaco) will close to salmon fishing at the end of the day Aug. 27. Effective Dates: 11:59 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 27. Species affected: All salmon. Locations: Marine Area 1 (Ilwaco); Leadbetter Point, Wash., to Cape Falcon, Oregon. Reason for action: Preliminary estimates indicate that anglers will reach the preseason coho quota of 18,900 by the end of the day Aug. 27. Closing the salmon fishery early will help ensure compliance with conservation objectives. Other information: The Buoy 10 fishery at the mouth of the Columbia River remains open as scheduled. For specific regulations, anglers should consult the 2016-17 fishing rules pamphlet, available online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/. Information Contact: Kyle Adicks, 360-902-2664. Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html.

Contact: Don Velasquez, (425) 775-1311, ext. 112 Most of Puget Sound closes to crabbing Sept. 5; summer catch reports due Oct. 1 OLYMPIA – Most areas of Puget Sound will close to recreational crab fishing on Labor Day (Sept. 5), when anyone harvesting crab from a boat must retrieve their gear by one hour after sunset. Crabbers fishing from shore or from piers have until the end of the day on Sept. 5 to retrieve their gear. All sport fishers licensed to fish for Dungeness crab anywhere in Puget Sound have through Oct. 1 to submit summer catch reports to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The only two areas of the Sound that will remain open to crab fishing after Labor Day are marine areas 7-North and 7-South near the San Juan Islands. These two areas will remain open Thursdays through Mondays each week through Sept. 30. Sport fishers who crab in those two areas after Sept. 5 must record their catch on winter catch record cards, which are available at sporting goods stores and other license vendors across the state. Crabbers can submit summer catch record cards to WDFW by mail at CRC Unit, 600 Capitol Way N., Olympia, WA 98501-1091. They can also report their catch online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/crab/ from Sept. 6 through Oct. 1. Crabbers who fail to file their catch reports on time will face a $10 fine when they purchase a 2017 Puget Sound crab endorsement. "Catch reports play a major role in determining how much crab is still available for harvest during the winter season," said Rich Childers, WDFW's shellfish policy lead. "It's important that we receive reports from everyone licensed to fish for crab in Puget Sound - whether or not they caught crab this year." Childers said WDFW will announce winter crab seasons for Puget Sound in early October, after completing its assessment of the summer fishery. For more information about recreational crabbing in Puget Sound, see WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/crab/. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. - 2:53 p.m. 8/26/2016
Contact: Don Velasquez, (425) 775-
1311, ext. 112

Most of Puget Sound closes to
crabbing Sept. 5; summer catch
reports due Oct. 1

OLYMPIA – Most areas of Puget Sound
will close to recreational crab
fishing on Labor Day (Sept. 5), when
anyone harvesting crab from a boat
must retrieve their gear by one hour
after sunset.

Crabbers fishing from shore or from
piers have until the end of the day
on Sept. 5 to retrieve their gear.

All sport fishers licensed to fish
for Dungeness crab anywhere in Puget
Sound have through Oct. 1 to submit
summer catch reports to the
Washington Department of Fish and
Wildlife (WDFW).

The only two areas of the Sound that
will remain open to crab fishing
after Labor Day are marine areas 7-
North and 7-South near the San Juan
Islands. These two areas will remain
open Thursdays through Mondays each
week through Sept. 30. Sport fishers
who crab in those two areas after
Sept. 5 must record their catch on
winter catch record cards, which are
available at sporting goods stores
and other license vendors across the
state.

Crabbers can submit summer catch
record cards to WDFW by mail at CRC
Unit, 600 Capitol Way N., Olympia, WA
98501-1091. They can also report
their catch online at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/
crab/ from Sept. 6 through Oct. 1.

Crabbers who fail to file their catch
reports on time will face a $10 fine
when they purchase a 2017 Puget Sound
crab endorsement.

"Catch reports play a major role in
determining how much crab is still
available for harvest during the
winter season," said Rich Childers,
WDFW's shellfish policy lead. "It's
important that we receive reports
from everyone licensed to fish for
crab in Puget Sound - whether or not
they caught crab this year."

Childers said WDFW will announce
winter crab seasons for Puget Sound
in early October, after completing
its assessment of the summer fishery.

For more information about
recreational crabbing in Puget Sound,
see WDFW's website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/
crab/.

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

August 26, 2016 WDFW lifts mark-selective rule for 2 days in Buoy 10 fishery Action: The Chinook mark-selective regulation in the Buoy 10 fishery on the lower Columbia River is lifted two days sooner than scheduled. Chinook retention on Sunday Sept. 4 and Monday Sept. 5 will include any fish, hatchery or wild. Species affected: Chinook Area: Mainstem Columbia River from Buoy 10 upstream to the Tongue Point/Rocky Point line. Effective date: Aug. 30 through Sept. 5, 2016. Salmon/steelhead daily limit: Chinook minimum size 24-inches. Coho minimum size 16-inches. Daily limit is 2 of which only 1 may be a Chinook. Only 1 hatchery steelhead may be retained. Release all salmon other than adipose fin-clipped coho. Reason for action: The Chinook catch has been lower than anticipated in the Buoy 10 fishery to date. Removing the mark-selective regulations for chinook September 4-5 will provide additional harvest opportunity. Additional information: The Buoy 10 fishery is scheduled to close for chinook retention on September 6, but the area remains open for hatchery Coho. The fishery is scheduled to re-open for chinook retention October 1. Information contact: (360) 696-6211. For latest information press *1010. Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw - 1:04 p.m. 8/26/2016
August 26, 2016

WDFW lifts mark-selective rule for 2
days in Buoy 10 fishery
Action: The Chinook mark-selective
regulation in the Buoy 10 fishery on
the lower Columbia River is lifted
two days sooner than scheduled.
Chinook retention on Sunday Sept. 4
and Monday Sept. 5 will include any
fish, hatchery or wild.

Species affected: Chinook

Area: Mainstem Columbia River from
Buoy 10 upstream to the Tongue
Point/Rocky Point line.

Effective date: Aug. 30 through
Sept. 5, 2016.

Salmon/steelhead daily limit:
Chinook minimum size 24-inches. Coho
minimum size 16-inches. Daily limit
is 2 of which only 1 may be a
Chinook. Only 1 hatchery steelhead
may be retained. Release all salmon
other than adipose fin-clipped coho.

Reason for action: The Chinook catch
has been lower than anticipated in
the Buoy 10 fishery to date.
Removing the mark-selective
regulations for chinook September 4-5
will provide additional harvest
opportunity.

Additional information: The Buoy 10
fishery is scheduled to close for
chinook retention on September 6, but
the area remains open for hatchery
Coho. The fishery is scheduled to
re-open for chinook retention October
1.

Information contact: (360) 696-6211.
For latest information press *1010.

Fishers must have a current
Washington fishing license,
appropriate to the fishery. Check the
WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules
pamphlet for details on fishing
seasons and regulations. Fishing
rules are subject to change. Check
the WDFW Fishing hotline for the
latest rule information at (360) 902-
2500, press 2 for recreational rules.
For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline
call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-
866-880-5431.
Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see http://wdfw

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Contact: Sam Taylor, (360) 902-2625 Fish and Wildlife Commission seeks candidates for disabilities advisory committee OLYMPIA - The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission is seeking applicants to fill three vacancies on its advisory committee for persons with disabilities. The seven-member committee advises the commission on issues of concern for hunters and fishers with disabilities, including special hunts, modified sporting equipment, access to public land and recreational opportunities - 9:35 a.m. 8/26/2016
Contact: Sam Taylor, (360) 902-2625

Fish and Wildlife Commission seeks
candidates for disabilities advisory
committee

OLYMPIA - The Washington Fish and
Wildlife Commission is seeking
applicants to fill three vacancies on
its advisory committee for persons
with disabilities.
The seven-member committee advises
the commission on issues of concern
for hunters and fishers with
disabilities, including special
hunts, modified sporting equipment,
access to public land and
recreational opportunities

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

WDFW offers free fishing while license sales are suspended OLYMPIA – The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is offering "free fishing" days through Tuesday while the agency's license sales system is down. Earlier this week, WDFW temporarily suspended the sale of fishing and hunting licenses. The agency is working with the state Office of Cyber Security (OCS) to investigate a vulnerability in an outside vendor's license sales system and is working to restore sales as soon as possible. In the meantime, WDFW will not require anglers to have a fishing license to fish or gather shellfish in any waters open to fishing in Washington state, beginning today through Tuesday, Aug. 30, said Jim Unsworth, WDFW director. Likewise, the department will not require anglers to have a vehicle access pass to park at WDFW water access sites. Other rules, such as seasons, size limits, bag limits, and closures, will remain in effect. Before heading out, anglers should also check the current fishing regulations at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/ Requirements for all anglers to have fishing licenses, catch record cards, and endorsements will be back in effect on Wednesday, Aug. 31. "We are as frustrated as our customers over the licensing system being shut down, but we want to make sure anglers can still hit the waters over the next several days," Unsworth said. Hunters will have to wait to buy licenses until the sales system can be restored, Unsworth noted. The agency anticipates having a sales channel available before major hunting seasons – such as archery deer, elk and cougar – begin in September, he said. "I appreciate our customers' patience while we work through this security vulnerability with our license sales vendor," Unsworth said. "The department is taking the steps necessary to ensure the sales site is secure and our customers' information is protected." WDFW will provide updates about license sales on its webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/, and through its Facebook site at www.facebook.com/WashingtonFishWildlife Department officials said a Columbia River Salmon and Steelhead Endorsement will not be needed to fish for salmon and steelhead in open areas of the Columbia River. Anglers will not need a two-pole endorsement to fish with two-poles in select waters where two pole fishing is permitted. Crabbers also will not need a Puget Sound crab endorsement through Aug. 30. Anglers will not be required to complete a catch record card for any salmon, steelhead, sturgeon or crab they catch from Aug. 25 through Aug. 30. Through Aug. 30, anglers will not need a Discover Pass to park at any of the nearly 700 water-access sites maintained by WDFW. The Discover Pass will still be required to access lands managed by the Washington Department of Natural Resources and Washington State Parks. The parks department had previously announced that it is not requiring a Discover Pass on Aug. 25 to celebrate the National Park Service's 100th anniversary. Discover Pass sales will continue at local dealerships and at state parks locations. More information on Discover Pass sales locations is available on WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/licensing/discoverpass/ - 12:23 p.m. 8/25/2016
WDFW offers free fishing while
license sales are suspended

OLYMPIA – The Washington Department
of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is
offering "free fishing" days through
Tuesday while the agency's license
sales system is down.

Earlier this week, WDFW temporarily
suspended the sale of fishing and
hunting licenses. The agency is
working with the state Office of
Cyber Security (OCS) to investigate a
vulnerability in an outside vendor's
license sales system and is working
to restore sales as soon as possible.

In the meantime, WDFW will not
require anglers to have a fishing
license to fish or gather shellfish
in any waters open to fishing in
Washington state, beginning today
through Tuesday, Aug. 30, said Jim
Unsworth, WDFW director. Likewise,
the department will not require
anglers to have a vehicle access pass
to park at WDFW water access sites.
Other rules, such as seasons, size
limits, bag limits, and closures,
will remain in effect.

Before heading out, anglers should
also check the current fishing
regulations at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulation
s/

Requirements for all anglers to have
fishing licenses, catch record cards,
and endorsements will be back in
effect on Wednesday, Aug. 31.

"We are as frustrated as our
customers over the licensing system
being shut down, but we want to make
sure anglers can still hit the waters
over the next several days," Unsworth
said.

Hunters will have to wait to buy
licenses until the sales system can
be restored, Unsworth noted. The
agency anticipates having a sales
channel available before major
hunting seasons – such as archery
deer, elk and cougar – begin in
September, he said.

"I appreciate our customers' patience
while we work through this security
vulnerability with our license sales
vendor," Unsworth said. "The
department is taking the steps
necessary to ensure the sales site is
secure and our customers' information
is protected."

WDFW will provide updates about
license sales on its webpage at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/, and through its
Facebook site at
www.facebook.com/WashingtonFishWildli
fe

Department officials said a Columbia
River Salmon and Steelhead
Endorsement will not be needed to
fish for salmon and steelhead in open
areas of the Columbia River. Anglers
will not need a two-pole endorsement
to fish with two-poles in select
waters where two pole fishing is
permitted. Crabbers also will not
need a Puget Sound crab endorsement
through Aug. 30.

Anglers will not be required to
complete a catch record card for any
salmon, steelhead, sturgeon or crab
they catch from Aug. 25 through Aug.
30.

Through Aug. 30, anglers will not
need a Discover Pass to park at any
of the nearly 700 water-access sites
maintained by WDFW. The Discover Pass
will still be required to access
lands managed by the Washington
Department of Natural Resources and
Washington State Parks. The parks
department had previously announced
that it is not requiring a Discover
Pass on Aug. 25 to celebrate the
National Park Service's 100th
anniversary.

Discover Pass sales will continue at
local dealerships and at state parks
locations. More information on
Discover Pass sales locations is
available on WDFW's website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/licensing/discover
pass/


Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Hunting and fishing license sales suspended while state agencies investigate system vulnerability OLYMPIA – The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has temporarily suspended the sale of fishing and hunting licenses while it works with the state Office of Cyber Security (OCS) to investigate a vulnerability in an outside vendor’s license sale system that was recently exploited in several states, including Washington. The vendor’s vulnerability allowed access to some personal information provided by customers who purchased fishing and hunting licenses. WDFW and OCS are working with the vendor and collaborating with law enforcement, federal agencies, and officials in other states to determine how much information was accessed. WDFW is working to resume license sales as soon as it can ensure the security of the system. More information will be released as it becomes available. - 5:33 a.m. 8/25/2016
Hunting and fishing license sales
suspended while state agencies
investigate system vulnerability

OLYMPIA – The Washington Department
of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has
temporarily suspended the sale of
fishing and hunting licenses while it
works with the state Office of Cyber
Security (OCS) to investigate a
vulnerability in an outside vendor’s
license sale system that was recently
exploited in several states,
including Washington.

The vendor’s vulnerability allowed
access to some personal information
provided by customers who purchased
fishing and hunting licenses. WDFW
and OCS are working with the vendor
and collaborating with law
enforcement, federal agencies, and
officials in other states to
determine how much information was
accessed.

WDFW is working to resume license
sales as soon as it can ensure the
security of the system. More
information will be released as it
becomes available.


Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

WDFW schedules meetings on proposed rules for saltwater sport fisheries OLYMPIA – State fishery managers are seeking public comments on sportfishing rules for the saltwater areas of Puget Sound and the Washington coast. As part of that effort, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has scheduled three meetings to discuss rules proposed for the 2017 season with the public. To review and comment on the proposed rules, visit WDFW’s webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/rule_proposals/. Comments will be accepted through Oct. 28. For a hard copy of the proposed rules, please call (360) 902-2200. The public and department staff submitted 66 proposals this spring. State fishery managers are recommending that 11 of the proposals move forward for additional review. The webpage has more information about the proposals as well as those not recommended for further consideration. The public meetings are scheduled for: Mill Creek: 6 to 8 p.m., Aug. 29, WDFW Region 4 headquarters, 16018 Mill Creek Blvd, Mill Creek. Port Townsend: 6 to 8 p.m., Aug. 30, Marina Room of the Point Hudson Marina, 130 Hudson St., Port Townsend. Olympia: 6 to 8 p.m., Aug. 31, Natural Resources Building - Room 172, 1111 Washington St. SE, Olympia. The public will also have the opportunity to provide testimony on the proposed rule changes during the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission’s meeting Nov. 4 and 5 in Olympia. Check the commission’s website http://wdfw.wa.gov/commission/meetings.html for details on the meeting. The commission, which sets policy for WDFW, is scheduled to vote on the proposals during a meeting in December. WDFW is recommending further discussion on proposals that would: Require fishing vessels carry a descending device when fishing for bottomfish or halibut in areas east of the Bonilla-Tatoosh line. The devices are used to return rockfish to deep water, reducing the number of rockfish deaths due to barotrauma, which occurs when rockfish are brought to the surface quickly. Make it unlawful to possess another person’s shellfish or food fish (including halibut, salmon and sturgeon) without written permission while in the field or in transit. Implement a 4 ½-inch minimum size requirement for Tanner crabs harvested in Puget Sound. Prohibit shellfish harvesters from cooking oysters in the shell or using heat to open oysters on the beach. Allow squid harvest year-round, including the harvest of Humboldt squid in Hood Canal. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- - 7:46 a.m. 8/23/2016
WDFW schedules meetings on proposed
rules for saltwater sport fisheries

OLYMPIA – State fishery managers are
seeking public comments on
sportfishing rules for the saltwater
areas of Puget Sound and the
Washington coast.

As part of that effort, the
Washington Department of Fish and
Wildlife (WDFW) has scheduled three
meetings to discuss rules proposed
for the 2017 season with the public.

To review and comment on the proposed
rules, visit WDFW’s webpage at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulation
s/rule_proposals/. Comments will be
accepted through Oct. 28. For a hard
copy of the proposed rules, please
call (360) 902-2200.

The public and department staff
submitted 66 proposals this spring.
State fishery managers are
recommending that 11 of the proposals
move forward for additional review.
The webpage has more information
about the proposals as well as those
not recommended for further
consideration.

The public meetings are scheduled
for:

Mill Creek: 6 to 8 p.m., Aug. 29,
WDFW Region 4 headquarters, 16018
Mill Creek Blvd, Mill Creek.
Port Townsend: 6 to 8 p.m., Aug. 30,
Marina Room of the Point Hudson
Marina, 130 Hudson St., Port
Townsend.
Olympia: 6 to 8 p.m., Aug. 31,
Natural Resources Building - Room
172, 1111 Washington St. SE, Olympia.
The public will also have the
opportunity to provide testimony on
the proposed rule changes during the
Washington Fish and Wildlife
Commission’s meeting Nov. 4 and 5 in
Olympia. Check the commission’s
website
http://wdfw.wa.gov/commission/meeting
s.html for details on the meeting.

The commission, which sets policy for
WDFW, is scheduled to vote on the
proposals during a meeting in
December.

WDFW is recommending further
discussion on proposals that would:

Require fishing vessels carry a
descending device when fishing for
bottomfish or halibut in areas east
of the Bonilla-Tatoosh line. The
devices are used to return rockfish
to deep water, reducing the number of
rockfish deaths due to barotrauma,
which occurs when rockfish are
brought to the surface quickly.
Make it unlawful to possess another
person’s shellfish or food fish
(including halibut, salmon and
sturgeon) without written permission
while in the field or in transit.
Implement a 4 ½-inch minimum size
requirement for Tanner crabs
harvested in Puget Sound.
Prohibit shellfish harvesters from
cooking oysters in the shell or using
heat to open oysters on the beach.
Allow squid harvest year-round,
including the harvest of Humboldt
squid in Hood Canal.

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Nfl steelies - 7:22 p.m. 8/21/2016
Anyone had ant success latley? I spent
most the day at several holes and
didnt see anything all day with the
exception a chinook that threw a hook

Jeff - Vancouver

WDFW ends action against wolf pack, pending further conflict with livestock OLYMPIA – The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) today halted efforts to lethally remove members of a wolf pack in Ferry County, but will restart the operation if there is another confirmed wolf attack on livestock. State wildlife officials shot and killed two members of the Profanity Peak wolf pack from a helicopter Aug. 5 after confirming five wolf-caused cattle mortalities since mid-July on the rangelands between Republic and Kettle Falls. Since Aug. 3, when the last of those attacks was confirmed, WDFW has found no evidence of any additional depredations by wolves in that area, said Donny Martorello, WDFW wolf policy lead. "The goal of removing some wolves from the pack was to stop wolf attacks on area cattle herds," Martorello said. "The last confirmed depredation by the pack was two weeks ago, but we are prepared to resume operations to remove wolves if monitoring efforts confirm new attacks." WDFW staff will continue to track the wolves' movements by monitoring GPS signals from radio-collars attached to two pack members, he said. During the two-week removal operation, WDFW officials used those signals to find wolves from the air, set traps and pursue them on the ground, Martorello said. These efforts became increasingly difficult in the second week, when the wolves withdrew to a heavily timbered area of the Kettle River Range, he said. The Profanity Peak wolf pack is one of 19 known wolf packs in Washington state. Earlier this summer, WDFW determined that the pack had at least 11 members, including six adults and five pups. WDFW Director Jim Unsworth authorized the lethal removal of some members of the Profanity Peak pack after staff biologists confirmed that wolves had killed at least four cattle – a cow and three calves. WDFW field staff confirmed a fifth fatal wolf attack on a calf that same day, and found it "probable" that the pack also killed three other calves earlier this summer. Unsworth said the department's action was consistent with both the state's Wolf Conservation and Management Plan and a new protocol for the lethal removal of wolves, developed this year by WDFW in conjunction with an 18-member advisory group composed of environmentalists, livestock producers and hunters. "This department is committed to wolf recovery, and for that reason we have a shared responsibility to protect livestock from repeated depredation by wolves," Unsworth said. "Maintaining public tolerance for wolves sometimes requires lethal measures, and we are prepared to respond if we confirm another wolf attack in the area this year." The two wolves killed this month were a breeding female and another adult female wolf. Martorello said wildlife officials did not target the breeding wolf, but there is no way to identify the breeding animals during a removal operation. "The pups are weaned at this age, so the loss of the breeding female is not likely to affect their survival since the remaining adults will provide them with food," Martorello said. The cattle killed by members of the Profanity Peak pack in recent weeks belonged to two ranchers who had taken preventive actions to deter attacks by wolves, Martorello said. Both have range riders keeping watch over their herds and sanitation measures in place to avoid attracting wolves. One rancher also turned his calves out to pasture at a higher weight as a defense against predators, Martorello said. Other provisions state that: The department must confirm four or more wolf depredation events on livestock within a calendar year, or six or more confirmed such events within two consecutive calendar years. Wolves must have killed, not just injured, livestock in at least one of those confirmed depredation events. WDFW must expect depredations to continue without taking lethal action to stop them. The department must notify the public about the pack's activities and related management actions. The new policy is available at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/gray_wolf/livestock/LethalRemovalProtocolGrayWolvesWashingtonDuringRecovery_05312016.pdf. WDFW is preparing a complete report on the recent action, including information about staff recommendations, the director's decision, and wolf removal activities. The removal of two wolves from the Profanity Peak pack marks the third time that WDFW has used lethal measures to address repeated depredations on livestock since 2008, when the first pack was confirmed in Washington state. A total of 10 wolves have been removed through those actions. During that time, the state's confirmed wolf population has grown from two wolves in one pack to at least 90 wolves and 19 packs by early 2016. Additional information about wolf packs and WDFW management actions is available at http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/gray_wolf/ Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message - 9:31 a.m. 8/19/2016
WDFW ends action against wolf pack,
pending further conflict with
livestock

OLYMPIA – The Washington Department
of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) today
halted efforts to lethally remove
members of a wolf pack in Ferry
County, but will restart the
operation if there is another
confirmed wolf attack on livestock.

State wildlife officials shot and
killed two members of the Profanity
Peak wolf pack from a helicopter Aug.
5 after confirming five wolf-caused
cattle mortalities since mid-July on
the rangelands between Republic and
Kettle Falls.

Since Aug. 3, when the last of those
attacks was confirmed, WDFW has found
no evidence of any additional
depredations by wolves in that area,
said Donny Martorello, WDFW wolf
policy lead.

"The goal of removing some wolves
from the pack was to stop wolf
attacks on area cattle herds,"
Martorello said. "The last confirmed
depredation by the pack was two weeks
ago, but we are prepared to resume
operations to remove wolves if
monitoring efforts confirm new
attacks."

WDFW staff will continue to track the
wolves' movements by monitoring GPS
signals from radio-collars attached
to two pack members, he said.

During the two-week removal
operation, WDFW officials used those
signals to find wolves from the air,
set traps and pursue them on the
ground, Martorello said. These
efforts became increasingly difficult
in the second week, when the wolves
withdrew to a heavily timbered area
of the Kettle River Range, he said.

The Profanity Peak wolf pack is one
of 19 known wolf packs in Washington
state. Earlier this summer, WDFW
determined that the pack had at least
11 members, including six adults and
five pups.

WDFW Director Jim Unsworth authorized
the lethal removal of some members of
the Profanity Peak pack after staff
biologists confirmed that wolves had
killed at least four cattle – a cow
and three calves. WDFW field staff
confirmed a fifth fatal wolf attack
on a calf that same day, and found it
"probable" that the pack also killed
three other calves earlier this
summer.

Unsworth said the department's action
was consistent with both the state's
Wolf Conservation and Management Plan
and a new protocol for the lethal
removal of wolves, developed this
year by WDFW in conjunction with an
18-member advisory group composed of
environmentalists, livestock
producers and hunters.

"This department is committed to wolf
recovery, and for that reason we have
a shared responsibility to protect
livestock from repeated depredation
by wolves," Unsworth said.
"Maintaining public tolerance for
wolves sometimes requires lethal
measures, and we are prepared to
respond if we confirm another wolf
attack in the area this year."

The two wolves killed this month were
a breeding female and another adult
female wolf.

Martorello said wildlife officials
did not target the breeding wolf, but
there is no way to identify the
breeding animals during a removal
operation.

"The pups are weaned at this age, so
the loss of the breeding female is
not likely to affect their survival
since the remaining adults will
provide them with food," Martorello
said.

The cattle killed by members of the
Profanity Peak pack in recent weeks
belonged to two ranchers who had
taken preventive actions to deter
attacks by wolves, Martorello said.
Both have range riders keeping watch
over their herds and sanitation
measures in place to avoid attracting
wolves. One rancher also turned his
calves out to pasture at a higher
weight as a defense against
predators, Martorello said.

Other provisions state that:

The department must confirm four or
more wolf depredation events on
livestock within a calendar year, or
six or more confirmed such events
within two consecutive calendar
years.
Wolves must have killed, not just
injured, livestock in at least one of
those confirmed depredation events.
WDFW must expect depredations to
continue without taking lethal action
to stop them.
The department must notify the public
about the pack's activities and
related management actions.
The new policy is available at:
http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/gray_
wolf/livestock/LethalRemovalProtocolG
rayWolvesWashingtonDuringRecovery_053
12016.pdf.

WDFW is preparing a complete report
on the recent action, including
information about staff
recommendations, the director's
decision, and wolf removal
activities.

The removal of two wolves from the
Profanity Peak pack marks the third
time that WDFW has used lethal
measures to address repeated
depredations on livestock since 2008,
when the first pack was confirmed in
Washington state. A total of 10
wolves have been removed through
those actions.

During that time, the state's
confirmed wolf population has grown
from two wolves in one pack to at
least 90 wolves and 19 packs by early
2016.

Additional information about wolf
packs and WDFW management actions is
available at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/gray_
wolf/

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Fall chinook harvest will be allowed on Snake River Action: The Snake River will open for the harvest of fall chinook salmon. Locations: On the Columbia River from the railroad bridge between Burbank and Kennewick upstream approximately 2.1 miles to the first power line crossing upstream of the navigation light on the point of Sacajawea State Park (Snake River Confluence Protection Area). On the Snake River from the mouth to the Oregon State line (approximately seven miles upstream of the mouth of the Grande Ronde River). Dates: Sept.1 through Oct. 31, 2016 Species affected: Chinook salmon Reason for action: The 2016 Columbia River forecasted return of upriver bright adults is 593,800, with a significant portion of these fish expected to return to the Snake River. Popular steelhead fisheries also occur in the area and some hatchery fall chinook are expected to be caught during steelhead fishing. Retention of hatchery fall chinook is not expected to increase impacts to ESA-listed wild fall chinook. Therefore, adipose-fin-clipped hatchery fall chinook that are caught can be retained in the Snake River. Other Information: The salmon daily limit in the Washington portion of the Snake River is six (6) adipose fin-clipped fall chinook adults (24 inches in length and larger), and six (6) adipose fin-clipped jack fall chinook (less than 24 inches). The minimum size for chinook that can be retained in the Snake River is 12 inches. Harvest of hatchery chinook (adults and jacks) is allowed seven days per week. Anglers must cease fishing for salmon and steelhead for the day once they have retained 3 hatchery steelhead – regardless of whether the salmon daily limit has been retained. Adipose fin-clipped fish must have a healed scar at the location of the missing fin. All chinook and steelhead with unclipped adipose fins must be immediately released unharmed. In addition, anglers must use barbless hooks when fishing for chinook or steelhead in the Snake River and the Snake River Confluence Protection Area. Anglers cannot remove any chinook or steelhead from the water unless it is retained as part of the daily bag limit. Anglers should be sure to identify their catch because returning unmarked chinook salmon, coho salmon and steelhead are also in the Snake River during this fishery. Information contact: Jeremy Trump, District 3 Fish Biologist (509) 382-1005 Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing regulations are subject to change. Call the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules or check the WDFW webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/ for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431. - 9:32 a.m. 8/18/2016
Fall chinook harvest will be allowed
on Snake River

Action: The Snake River will open for
the harvest of fall chinook salmon.

Locations:

On the Columbia River from the
railroad bridge between Burbank and
Kennewick upstream approximately 2.1
miles to the first power line
crossing upstream of the navigation
light on the point of Sacajawea State
Park (Snake River Confluence
Protection Area).
On the Snake River from the mouth to
the Oregon State line (approximately
seven miles upstream of the mouth of
the Grande Ronde River).
Dates: Sept.1 through Oct. 31, 2016

Species affected: Chinook salmon

Reason for action: The 2016 Columbia
River forecasted return of upriver
bright adults is 593,800, with a
significant portion of these fish
expected to return to the Snake
River. Popular steelhead fisheries
also occur in the area and some
hatchery fall chinook are expected to
be caught during steelhead fishing.
Retention of hatchery fall chinook is
not expected to increase impacts to
ESA-listed wild fall chinook.
Therefore, adipose-fin-clipped
hatchery fall chinook that are caught
can be retained in the Snake River.

Other Information: The salmon daily
limit in the Washington portion of
the Snake River is six (6) adipose
fin-clipped fall chinook adults (24
inches in length and larger), and six
(6) adipose fin-clipped jack fall
chinook (less than 24 inches). The
minimum size for chinook that can be
retained in the Snake River is 12
inches.

Harvest of hatchery chinook (adults
and jacks) is allowed seven days per
week. Anglers must cease fishing for
salmon and steelhead for the day once
they have retained 3 hatchery
steelhead – regardless of whether the
salmon daily limit has been retained.
Adipose fin-clipped fish must have a
healed scar at the location of the
missing fin. All chinook and
steelhead with unclipped adipose fins
must be immediately released
unharmed. In addition, anglers must
use barbless hooks when fishing for
chinook or steelhead in the Snake
River and the Snake River Confluence
Protection Area. Anglers cannot
remove any chinook or steelhead from
the water unless it is retained as
part of the daily bag limit. Anglers
should be sure to identify their
catch because returning unmarked
chinook salmon, coho salmon and
steelhead are also in the Snake River
during this fishery.

Information contact: Jeremy Trump,
District 3 Fish Biologist (509) 382-
1005

Fishers must have a current
Washington fishing license. Check the
WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules
pamphlet for details on fishing
seasons and regulations. Fishing
regulations are subject to change.
Call the WDFW Fishing hotline for the
latest rule information at (360) 902-
2500, press 2 for recreational rules
or check the WDFW webpage at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulation
s/ for details on fishing seasons and
regulations.

Fishers must have a current
Washington fishing license,
appropriate to the fishery. Check the
WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules
pamphlet for details on fishing
seasons and regulations. Fishing
rules are subject to change. Check
the WDFW Fishing hotline for the
latest rule information at (360) 902-
2500, press 2 for recreational rules.
For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline
call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-
866-880-5431.

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

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For fishing pictures go to LewisRiver.com monthy fishing pictures.
For more information go to Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Call 1.800.547.1501 for updated reservoir levels and estimated river flow below Merwin.
For N. F . Lewis River flow go to River Flows At Ariel.
For East Fork Lewis River flow go to East Fork Lewis River Near Heisson, Wa.

Stream flow and reservoir levels at:
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Lewis River at Ariel      Lewis River Reservoir Levels

We are very pleased to offer you this fishing report site. Please only post reports or information that is of interest to all. Many people want a fast report and don't have time to read a lot of other stuff. Inappropriate posts will be deleted. Thanks, Noel Johnson.

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