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Trout stocking crews active across Washington; Preparations continue for April 22 opening day OLYMPIA–Trout stocking crews are working to plant fish throughout the state in preparation for April 22, when several hundred lowland lakes open for a six-month fishing season. Although many lakes are open year-round, the fourth Saturday in April marks the traditional start of the lowland lakes fishing season, when hundreds of thousands of anglers are expected to turn out to fish. WDFW fish hatchery crews have been stocking more than 16 million trout and kokanee in lakes statewide. Those fish include 2.3 million catchable trout, nearly 150,000 larger trout averaging about one pound apiece, and millions of smaller trout that were stocked last year and have grown to catchable size. At this point, we are about half finished with the stocking effort, said Steve Thiesfeld, WDFW inland fish program manager. "We are working hard to have it all done in time for opening weekend," he said. Many of the triploid trout are coming in at about a pound, but there are several thousand that are three pounds or more, said Thiesfeld. "These are all high quality fish that are significantly larger than our regular catchable trout, and those three pounders are outstanding fish," he said. A lot of the larger fish are destined for lakes on the eastern side of the state, ensuring great fishing in perennial hotspots like Loon, Jameson, and North Fio Rito lakes, he said. On the westside, the department is going to add some of these fish to each of our regular plants in lakes that haven't been stocked yet, said Thiesfeld. "We expect these larger fish are going to make some kids very happy." To participate on opening day, Washington anglers must have an annual freshwater or combination fishing license valid through March 31, 2018. Licenses can be purchased online at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov; by telephone at 1-866-246-9453; or at hundreds of license dealers across the state. For details on license vendor locations, visit the WDFW website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/licensing/vendors/ Anglers who catch one of 1,000 tagged fish can also claim prizes provided by license dealers and other sponsors located across the state. The total value of prizes is more than $25,000. For a list of lakes with prize fish and details on how to claim prizes, visit http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/derby/ Fish stocking details, by county and lake, are available in the annual stocking plan on WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/statewide/ Before heading out, anglers should check fishing regulations on WDFW's webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/. With snow and ice still present in some parts of the state, anglers should also check ahead of time to be sure their preferred lake is accessible. WDFW employees and their immediate families are not eligible to claim fishing derby prizes. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list. Visit the WDFW News Release Archive at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/ To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html - 4:59 p.m. 4/13/2017
Trout stocking crews active across
Washington;
Preparations continue for April 22
opening day

OLYMPIA–Trout stocking crews are
working to plant fish throughout the
state in preparation for April 22,
when several hundred lowland lakes
open for a six-month fishing season.

Although many lakes are open year-
round, the fourth Saturday in April
marks the traditional start of the
lowland lakes fishing season, when
hundreds of thousands of anglers are
expected to turn out to fish.

WDFW fish hatchery crews have been
stocking more than 16 million trout
and kokanee in lakes statewide. Those
fish include 2.3 million catchable
trout, nearly 150,000 larger trout
averaging about one pound apiece, and
millions of smaller trout that were
stocked last year and have grown to
catchable size.

At this point, we are about half
finished with the stocking effort,
said Steve Thiesfeld, WDFW inland
fish program manager. "We are working
hard to have it all done in time for
opening weekend," he said.

Many of the triploid trout are coming
in at about a pound, but there are
several thousand that are three
pounds or more, said Thiesfeld.
"These are all high quality fish that
are significantly larger than our
regular catchable trout, and those
three pounders are outstanding fish,"
he said.

A lot of the larger fish are destined
for lakes on the eastern side of the
state, ensuring great fishing in
perennial hotspots like Loon,
Jameson, and North Fio Rito lakes, he
said.

On the westside, the department is
going to add some of these fish to
each of our regular plants in lakes
that haven't been stocked yet, said
Thiesfeld. "We expect these larger
fish are going to make some kids very
happy."

To participate on opening day,
Washington anglers must have an
annual freshwater or combination
fishing license valid through March
31, 2018. Licenses can be purchased
online at
https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov; by
telephone at 1-866-246-9453; or at
hundreds of license dealers across
the state. For details on license
vendor locations, visit the WDFW
website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/licensing/vendors/

Anglers who catch one of 1,000 tagged
fish can also claim prizes provided
by license dealers and other sponsors
located across the state. The total
value of prizes is more than $25,000.
For a list of lakes with prize fish
and details on how to claim prizes,
visit
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/derby/

Fish stocking details, by county and
lake, are available in the annual
stocking plan on WDFW's website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/sta
tewide/

Before heading out, anglers should
check fishing regulations on WDFW's
webpage at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulation
s/. With snow and ice still present
in some parts of the state, anglers
should also check ahead of time to be
sure their preferred lake is
accessible.

WDFW employees and their immediate
families are not eligible to claim
fishing derby prizes.

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to the
WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the WDFW News Release Archive
at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing
list:
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.
html

Noel E Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Spring chinook fishery extended again in lower Columbia River OLYMPIA – State fishery managers have again extended the initial sportfishing season for spring chinook salmon on the lower Columbia River in response to poor fishing conditions caused by extremely high, turbid water. The fishery will reopen from April 13-17 and from April 20-23 upstream from Buoy 10 at the mouth of the Columbia River to Bonneville Dam, except in the Lewis River sanctuary. The extension was approved today by fishery managers from Washington and Oregon, who previously extended the season by four days earlier this month. With seasonal water flow well above average, anglers have not had much success in getting fish to bite, said Ron Roler, a Columbia River fishery manager for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Through April 10, anglers had caught only about 10 percent of the upriver spring chinook available for harvest at this point in the season. Meanwhile, only 217 adult spring chinook salmon have been counted passing Bonneville Dam through April 10, far short of the 1,600 fish previously expected by mid-April. "Test fisheries in the lower river are finding plenty of spring chinook," Roler said. "They're just not very quick to bite or move upriver under these conditions. Often visibility in the river is so limited that the fish can't see the anglers' lures." He suggests that anglers check reports of streamflows and fish-passage levels at Bonneville Dam for signs of improving fishing conditions. "Fishing should pick up fairly quickly once the fish start to move," Roler said. Anglers planning to fish for spring chinook in the lower Columbia are advised to check the new fishing rule at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/. The spring chinook fishery upriver from Bonneville Dam to the Washington-Oregon border near Umatilla is not affected by the extension in the lower river and remains open until May 5. If spring chinook return at or above projections, fishery managers plan to provide additional fishing opportunities in both areas later this spring. Anglers fishing those waters are allowed to retain one marked, hatchery-reared adult chinook salmon as part of their daily limit of two salmon, two steelhead, or one of each. Any chinook or steelhead without a clipped adipose fin and a healed scar must be released unharmed. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list. Visit the WDFW News Release Archive at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/ To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html - 3:58 a.m. 4/13/2017
Spring chinook fishery extended again
in lower Columbia River

OLYMPIA – State fishery managers have
again extended the initial
sportfishing season for spring
chinook salmon on the lower Columbia
River in response to poor fishing
conditions caused by extremely high,
turbid water.

The fishery will reopen from April
13-17 and from April 20-23 upstream
from Buoy 10 at the mouth of the
Columbia River to Bonneville Dam,
except in the Lewis River sanctuary.

The extension was approved today by
fishery managers from Washington and
Oregon, who previously extended the
season by four days earlier this
month.

With seasonal water flow well above
average, anglers have not had much
success in getting fish to bite, said
Ron Roler, a Columbia River fishery
manager for the Washington Department
of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).

Through April 10, anglers had caught
only about 10 percent of the upriver
spring chinook available for harvest
at this point in the season.

Meanwhile, only 217 adult spring
chinook salmon have been counted
passing Bonneville Dam through April
10, far short of the 1,600 fish
previously expected by mid-April.

"Test fisheries in the lower river
are finding plenty of spring
chinook," Roler said. "They're just
not very quick to bite or move
upriver under these conditions. Often
visibility in the river is so limited
that the fish can't see the anglers'
lures."

He suggests that anglers check
reports of streamflows and fish-
passage levels at Bonneville Dam for
signs of improving fishing
conditions.

"Fishing should pick up fairly
quickly once the fish start to move,"
Roler said.

Anglers planning to fish for spring
chinook in the lower Columbia are
advised to check the new fishing rule
at
https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/ef
ishrules/.

The spring chinook fishery upriver
from Bonneville Dam to the
Washington-Oregon border near
Umatilla is not affected by the
extension in the lower river and
remains open until May 5. If spring
chinook return at or above
projections, fishery managers plan to
provide additional fishing
opportunities in both areas later
this spring.

Anglers fishing those waters are
allowed to retain one marked,
hatchery-reared adult chinook salmon
as part of their daily limit of two
salmon, two steelhead, or one of
each. Any chinook or steelhead
without a clipped adipose fin and a
healed scar must be released
unharmed.

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to the
WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the WDFW News Release Archive
at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing
list:
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.
html

Noel E Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

OLYMPIA – State shellfish managers have given the OK for a five-day razor clam dig at Twin Harbors starting April 5, and have tentatively scheduled the beach to open again later this month. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the opening after marine toxin tests showed clams at Twin Harbors are safe to eat. Razor clam diggers should be aware that the first four days of the dig are on evening tides, whereas the last day's dig is on a morning tide, said Dan Ayres, coastal shellfish manager for WDFW. "We know diggers are looking forward to returning to Twin Harbors and we are happy to announce these new opportunities," Ayres said. The first four days of digging are approved on the following dates and evening low tides: April 5, Wednesday, 3:06 p.m.; 0.5 feet; Twin Harbors April 6, Thursday, 4:08 p.m.; 0.4 feet; Twin Harbors April 7, Friday, 5:01 p.m.; 0.4 feet; Twin Harbors April 8, Saturday, 5:46 p.m.; 0.4 feet; Twin Harbors The fifth day of digging will be conducted on morning tides, as will other digs through the end of the season: April 9, Sunday, 6:25 a.m.; 0.5 feet; Twin Harbors Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger's clams must be kept in a separate container. All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2017-18 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW's website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state. State shellfish managers also added Twin Harbors to a tentatively scheduled dig in mid-April that includes openings at Copalis and Mocrocks. The planned opening depends on the results of marine toxin tests, which generally take place about a week before the dig is scheduled. The proposed razor clam digs, along with morning low tides and beaches, are listed below: April 12, Wednesday, 8:08 a.m.; 0.0 feet; Twin Harbors April 13, Thursday, 8:43 a.m.; 0.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis April 14, Friday, 9:18 a.m.; 0.1 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks April 15, Saturday, 9:55 a.m.; 0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis April 16, Sunday, 10:36 a.m., 0.5 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks Long Beach remains closed to digging, Ayres noted. However, the beach could open soon if the next round of toxin testing shows the clams there are safe to eat. During all upcoming digs, state wildlife managers urge clam diggers to avoid disturbing snowy plovers and streaked horned larks. Both species nest in the soft, dry sand on the southern section of Twin Harbors beach and at Leadbetter Point on the Long Beach Peninsula. The snowy plover is a small bird with gray wings and a white breast. The lark is a small bird with a pale yellow breast and brown back. Male larks have a black mask, breast band and "horns." To protect these birds, the department asks that clam diggers avoid the dunes and areas of the beach with soft, dry sand. When driving to a clam-digging area, diggers should enter the beach only at designated access points and stay on the hard-packed sand near or below the high tide line. More details on how to avoid disturbing nesting birds can be found on the WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/ Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list. Visit the WDFW News Release Archive at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/ To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html - 4:27 a.m. 4/5/2017
OLYMPIA – State shellfish managers
have given the OK for a five-day
razor clam dig at Twin Harbors
starting April 5, and have
tentatively scheduled the beach to
open again later this month.

The Washington Department of Fish and
Wildlife (WDFW) approved the opening
after marine toxin tests showed clams
at Twin Harbors are safe to eat.

Razor clam diggers should be aware
that the first four days of the dig
are on evening tides, whereas the
last day's dig is on a morning tide,
said Dan Ayres, coastal shellfish
manager for WDFW.

"We know diggers are looking forward
to returning to Twin Harbors and we
are happy to announce these new
opportunities," Ayres said.

The first four days of digging are
approved on the following dates and
evening low tides:

April 5, Wednesday, 3:06 p.m.; 0.5
feet; Twin Harbors
April 6, Thursday, 4:08 p.m.; 0.4
feet; Twin Harbors
April 7, Friday, 5:01 p.m.; 0.4 feet;
Twin Harbors
April 8, Saturday, 5:46 p.m.; 0.4
feet; Twin Harbors
The fifth day of digging will be
conducted on morning tides, as will
other digs through the end of the
season:

April 9, Sunday, 6:25 a.m.; 0.5 feet;
Twin Harbors
Under state law, diggers at open
beaches can take 15 razor clams per
day and are required to keep the
first 15 they dig. Each digger's
clams must be kept in a separate
container.

All diggers age 15 or older must have
an applicable 2017-18 fishing license
to harvest razor clams on any beach.
Licenses, ranging from a three-day
razor clam license to an annual
combination fishing license, are
available on WDFW's website at
https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from
license vendors around the state.

State shellfish managers also added
Twin Harbors to a tentatively
scheduled dig in mid-April that
includes openings at Copalis and
Mocrocks. The planned opening depends
on the results of marine toxin tests,
which generally take place about a
week before the dig is scheduled.

The proposed razor clam digs, along
with morning low tides and beaches,
are listed below:

April 12, Wednesday, 8:08 a.m.; 0.0
feet; Twin Harbors
April 13, Thursday, 8:43 a.m.; 0.0
feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
April 14, Friday, 9:18 a.m.; 0.1
feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
April 15, Saturday, 9:55 a.m.; 0.3
feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
April 16, Sunday, 10:36 a.m., 0.5
feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
Long Beach remains closed to digging,
Ayres noted. However, the beach could
open soon if the next round of toxin
testing shows the clams there are
safe to eat.

During all upcoming digs, state
wildlife managers urge clam diggers
to avoid disturbing snowy plovers and
streaked horned larks. Both species
nest in the soft, dry sand on the
southern section of Twin Harbors
beach and at Leadbetter Point on the
Long Beach Peninsula. The snowy
plover is a small bird with gray
wings and a white breast. The lark is
a small bird with a pale yellow
breast and brown back. Male larks
have a black mask, breast band and
"horns."

To protect these birds, the
department asks that clam diggers
avoid the dunes and areas of the
beach with soft, dry sand. When
driving to a clam-digging area,
diggers should enter the beach only
at designated access points and stay
on the hard-packed sand near or below
the high tide line.

More details on how to avoid
disturbing nesting birds can be found
on the WDFW's website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/
razorclams/

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to the
WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the WDFW News Release Archive
at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing
list:
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.
html

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

2017-18 license required: Anglers age 15 and older are required to have a valid 2017-18 fishing license to participate all of these fisheries after March 31, when 2016-17 licenses expire. Licenses are avaiIable online, by phone (1-866-246-9453), and from license dealers around the state. Also note that the current Fish Washington rule pamphlet remains valid through June 30. Spring chinook salmon: Record-setting flows of turbid water washed out fisheries in the Columbia River Basin in March, with no immediate relief in sight. At Bonneville Dam, streamflows reached levels unmatched since 1950, reducing anglers' catch to a fraction of the levels expected during the first month of fishing. In response, state fishery managers extended the initial season for spring chinook below Bonneville Dam by four days. The initial fishing period, originally set to close April 6, was extended through April 10 under an agreement reached by fishery managers from Washington and Oregon. Farther upstream, the sport fishery between Bonneville Dam and the Washington-Oregon border, east of Umatilla, remains open through May 5. "As everyone knows, it's extremely rough out there," said Joe Hymer, a WDFW fish biologist. "The best bet for anglers is to watch for conditions to improve. Catches can ramp up quickly once streamflows subside and more fish start moving upriver." Hymer recommends that anglers check river flows and fish-passage counts for signs of improvement, and keep their eyes peeled for floating debris once they get out on the water. Anglers fishing the Columbia River are allowed to catch and keep one marked, hatchery-reared chinook salmon as part of their daily limit of two adult salmon, two steelhead, or one of each. Best bets for spring chinook: Given the turbid river conditions, Hymer said a good fishing strategy is to fish close to riverbanks and near the mouth of the Kalama and Wind rivers and Drano Lake. "Those areas are likely to clear first, and give anglers a chance to catch some fish," he said. Once the river drops and clears, Hymer suggests trying the lower river near the Cathlamet area or just below Bonneville Dam. The Cowlitz and Kalama rivers also offer good opportunities for taking home a hatchery spring chinook, and the Cowlitz is also a good place to catch late winter-run steelhead. Anglers should be aware, however, that fishing for spring chinook is closed on the Lewis River, and that all fishing is closed near the mouth of the Lewis, as defined by the fishing rule posted on WDFW's website. Trout: The season opens full throttle April 22 when several hundred lowland lakes throughout the state open for business. While most lakes in the region are open year-round, "opening day" marks the debut of such perennial favorites as Mineral Lake, Fort Borst Park Pond, Carlisle Lake, and Davis Lake in Lewis County; and Rowland, Spearfish and Horsethief lakes in Klickitat County. Swift Power Canal also will be planted with trout prior to the April 22 opener. Kidney Lake in Skamania County will not be stocked this year, because the lake is located on private property and there is no public access to stock it. Like last year, Swift Reservoir will not open until the first Saturday in June to protect salmon and steelhead smolts migrating downstream. Those smolts are part of an ongoing reintroduction program under re-licensing agreements with PacifiCorp. In other waters, WDFW will continue to plant thousands of catchable trout in Clark County year-round lakes, including Klineline Pond, Battleground Lake and Lacamas Lake. Three lakes in Cowlitz County – Sacajawea, Kress, and Horseshoe lakes – will also receive plants of rainbow trout, as will three lakes in Skamania County – Icehouse, Little Ash, and Tunnel lakes. To accommodate a fishing event for kids, Klineline Park in Vancouver will be closed to the general public April 6-8. More information is available on WDFW's website. Warmwater fish: Anglers can fish for bass, walleye and channel catfish without daily catch or size limits from the mouth of the Columbia River 545 miles upstream to Chief Joseph Dam. A fishing rule approved last year by WDFW removed the remaining limits for those species in boundary waters shared with Oregon and nearly two-dozen tributaries to the Columbia River. Be sure to check the rule change notice for the details. - 10:12 a.m. 4/1/2017
2017-18 license required: Anglers age
15 and older are required to have a
valid 2017-18 fishing license to
participate all of these fisheries
after March 31, when 2016-17 licenses
expire. Licenses are avaiIable
online, by phone (1-866-246-9453),
and from license dealers around the
state. Also note that the current
Fish Washington rule pamphlet remains
valid through June 30.

Spring chinook salmon: Record-setting
flows of turbid water washed out
fisheries in the Columbia River Basin
in March, with no immediate relief in
sight. At Bonneville Dam, streamflows
reached levels unmatched since 1950,
reducing anglers' catch to a fraction
of the levels expected during the
first month of fishing.

In response, state fishery managers
extended the initial season for
spring chinook below Bonneville Dam
by four days. The initial fishing
period, originally set to close April
6, was extended through April 10
under an agreement reached by fishery
managers from Washington and Oregon.

Farther upstream, the sport fishery
between Bonneville Dam and the
Washington-Oregon border, east of
Umatilla, remains open through May 5.

"As everyone knows, it's extremely
rough out there," said Joe Hymer, a
WDFW fish biologist. "The best bet
for anglers is to watch for
conditions to improve. Catches can
ramp up quickly once streamflows
subside and more fish start moving
upriver."

Hymer recommends that anglers check
river flows and fish-passage counts
for signs of improvement, and keep
their eyes peeled for floating debris
once they get out on the water.

Anglers fishing the Columbia River
are allowed to catch and keep one
marked, hatchery-reared chinook
salmon as part of their daily limit
of two adult salmon, two steelhead,
or one of each.

Best bets for spring chinook: Given
the turbid river conditions, Hymer
said a good fishing strategy is to
fish close to riverbanks and near the
mouth of the Kalama and Wind rivers
and Drano Lake. "Those areas are
likely to clear first, and give
anglers a chance to catch some fish,"
he said.

Once the river drops and clears,
Hymer suggests trying the lower river
near the Cathlamet area or just below
Bonneville Dam. The Cowlitz and
Kalama rivers also offer good
opportunities for taking home a
hatchery spring chinook, and the
Cowlitz is also a good place to catch
late winter-run steelhead.

Anglers should be aware, however,
that fishing for spring chinook is
closed on the Lewis River, and that
all fishing is closed near the mouth
of the Lewis, as defined by the
fishing rule posted on WDFW's
website.

Trout: The season opens full throttle
April 22 when several hundred lowland
lakes throughout the state open for
business. While most lakes in the
region are open year-round, "opening
day" marks the debut of such
perennial favorites as Mineral Lake,
Fort Borst Park Pond, Carlisle Lake,
and Davis Lake in Lewis County; and
Rowland, Spearfish and Horsethief
lakes in Klickitat County. Swift
Power Canal also will be planted with
trout prior to the April 22 opener.

Kidney Lake in Skamania County will
not be stocked this year, because the
lake is located on private property
and there is no public access to
stock it.

Like last year, Swift Reservoir will
not open until the first Saturday in
June to protect salmon and steelhead
smolts migrating downstream. Those
smolts are part of an ongoing
reintroduction program under re-
licensing agreements with PacifiCorp.

In other waters, WDFW will continue
to plant thousands of catchable trout
in Clark County year-round lakes,
including Klineline Pond,
Battleground Lake and Lacamas Lake.
Three lakes in Cowlitz County –
Sacajawea, Kress, and Horseshoe lakes
– will also receive plants of rainbow
trout, as will three lakes in
Skamania County – Icehouse, Little
Ash, and Tunnel lakes.

To accommodate a fishing event for
kids, Klineline Park in Vancouver
will be closed to the general public
April 6-8. More information is
available on WDFW's website.

Warmwater fish: Anglers can fish for
bass, walleye and channel catfish
without daily catch or size limits
from the mouth of the Columbia River
545 miles upstream to Chief Joseph
Dam. A fishing rule approved last
year by WDFW removed the remaining
limits for those species in boundary
waters shared with Oregon and nearly
two-dozen tributaries to the Columbia
River. Be sure to check the rule
change notice for the details.

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Spring chinook fishery extended four days below Bonneville Dam OLYMPIA – State fishery managers have extended the initial sportfishing season for spring chinook salmon on the lower Columbia River by four days in response to poor fishing conditions caused by extremely high, turbid water. The initial fishing period, previously set to close April 6, was extended through April 10 under an agreement reached today by fishery managers from Washington and Oregon. As of March 26, catch estimates show that Washington state anglers had caught a total of 24 upriver spring chinook salmon, just a fraction of the expected harvest of 6,905 upriver chinook through April 6. "It's clear that the spring chinook catch is running well below expectations, so we're announcing the extension now to give the angling community and industry time to plan ahead," said John Long, southwest regional manager for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although this year's upriver spring chinook run to the Columbia River is predicted to be about 35 percent lower than in 2016, Long said that is not the primary reason for anglers' lack of success. The real problem, he said, is that record-setting streamflows carrying logs and other debris, which has made fishing difficult – and potentially dangerous – in recent weeks. "Test fisheries show that the spring chinook run has arrived, but in a lot of cases visibility in the river is so limited that the fish can't see the anglers' lures," Long said. He suggests that anglers check reports of streamflows and fish-passage levels at Bonneville Dam for signs of improving fishing conditions. The spring chinook fishery upriver from Bonneville Dam to the Washington-Oregon border near Umatilla is open until May 5, and will not be affected by the extension in the lower river. If spring chinook return at or above projections, fishery managers plan to provide additional fishing opportunities in both areas later this spring. Anglers fishing those waters are allowed to retain one marked, hatchery-reared adult chinook salmon as part of their daily limit of two salmon, two steelhead, or one of each. Any chinook or steelhead without a clipped adipose fin and a healed scar must be released unharmed. Persons with d - 9:26 a.m. 3/31/2017
Spring chinook fishery extended four
days below Bonneville Dam

OLYMPIA – State fishery managers have
extended the initial sportfishing
season for spring chinook salmon on
the lower Columbia River by four days
in response to poor fishing
conditions caused by extremely high,
turbid water.

The initial fishing period,
previously set to close April 6, was
extended through April 10 under an
agreement reached today by fishery
managers from Washington and Oregon.

As of March 26, catch estimates show
that Washington state anglers had
caught a total of 24 upriver spring
chinook salmon, just a fraction of
the expected harvest of 6,905 upriver
chinook through April 6.

"It's clear that the spring chinook
catch is running well below
expectations, so we're announcing the
extension now to give the angling
community and industry time to plan
ahead," said John Long, southwest
regional manager for the Washington
Department of Fish and Wildlife
(WDFW).

Although this year's upriver spring
chinook run to the Columbia River is
predicted to be about 35 percent
lower than in 2016, Long said that is
not the primary reason for anglers'
lack of success. The real problem, he
said, is that record-setting
streamflows carrying logs and other
debris, which has made fishing
difficult – and potentially dangerous
– in recent weeks.

"Test fisheries show that the spring
chinook run has arrived, but in a lot
of cases visibility in the river is
so limited that the fish can't see
the anglers' lures," Long said.

He suggests that anglers check
reports of streamflows and fish-
passage levels at Bonneville Dam for
signs of improving fishing
conditions.

The spring chinook fishery upriver
from Bonneville Dam to the
Washington-Oregon border near
Umatilla is open until May 5, and
will not be affected by the extension
in the lower river. If spring chinook
return at or above projections,
fishery managers plan to provide
additional fishing opportunities in
both areas later this spring.

Anglers fishing those waters are
allowed to retain one marked,
hatchery-reared adult chinook salmon
as part of their daily limit of two
salmon, two steelhead, or one of
each. Any chinook or steelhead
without a clipped adipose fin and a
healed scar must be released
unharmed.

Persons with d

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Hundreds of lowland lakes open April 22 with new opportunities to pull in prize fish OLYMPIA–Trout fishing in Washington reaches full speed April 22, when several hundred lowland lakes – stocked with millions of fish – open for a six-month season. That date also marks the start of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's (WDFW) annual lowland lake fishing derby, which runs through Oct. 31. "Although many lakes are open year-round, the fourth Saturday in April marks the traditional start of the lowland lakes fishing season, when hundreds of thousands of anglers are expected to turn out to fish," said Steve Thiesfeld, WDFW inland fish program manager. To participate, Washington anglers must have an annual freshwater or combination fishing license valid through March 31, 2018. Licenses can be purchased online at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov; by telephone at 1-866-246-9453; or at hundreds of license dealers across the state. For details on license vendor locations, visit the WDFW website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/licensing/vendors/ Anglers - 9:24 a.m. 3/31/2017
Hundreds of lowland lakes open April
22
with new opportunities to pull in
prize fish

OLYMPIA–Trout fishing in Washington
reaches full speed April 22, when
several hundred lowland lakes –
stocked with millions of fish – open
for a six-month season.

That date also marks the start of the
Washington Department of Fish and
Wildlife's (WDFW) annual lowland lake
fishing derby, which runs through
Oct. 31.

"Although many lakes are open year-
round, the fourth Saturday in April
marks the traditional start of the
lowland lakes fishing season, when
hundreds of thousands of anglers are
expected to turn out to fish," said
Steve Thiesfeld, WDFW inland fish
program manager.

To participate, Washington anglers
must have an annual freshwater or
combination fishing license valid
through March 31, 2018. Licenses can
be purchased online at
https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov; by
telephone at 1-866-246-9453; or at
hundreds of license dealers across
the state. For details on license
vendor locations, visit the WDFW
website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/licensing/vendors/

Anglers

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Hundreds of lowland lakes open April 22 with new opportunities to pull in prize fish OLYMPIA–Trout fishing in Washington reaches full speed April 22, when several hundred lowland lakes – stocked with millions of fish – open for a six-month season. That date also marks the start of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's (WDFW) annual lowland lake fishing derby, which runs through Oct. 31. "Although many lakes are open year-round, the fourth Saturday in April marks the traditional start of the lowland lakes fishing season, when hundreds of thousands of anglers are expected to turn out to fish," said Steve Thiesfeld, WDFW inland fish program manager. To participate, Washington anglers must have an annual freshwater or combination fishing license valid through March 31, 2018. Licenses can be purchased online at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov; by telephone at 1-866-246-9453; or at hundreds of license dealers across the state. For details on license vendor locations, visit the WDFW website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/licensing/vendors/ Anglers who catch one of 1,000 tagged fish can also claim prizes provided by license dealers and other sponsors located across the state. The total value of prizes is more than $25,000. For a list of lakes with prize fish and details on how to claim prizes, visit http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/derby/ WDFW fish hatchery crews have been stocking more than 16 million trout and kokanee in lakes statewide. Those fish include 2.3 million catchable trout, nearly 150,000 larger trout averaging about one pound apiece, and millions of smaller trout that were stocked last year and have grown to catchable size. Fish stocking details, by county and lake, are available in the annual stocking plan on WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/statewide/ Opening weekend is a time when success rates are likely to be higher, says Thiesfeld. "When I was a kid, I had a difficult time sleeping the night before opening day. It's so exciting to get out there and fish, and opening weekend is just an excellent time to introduce fishing to kids and beginners," he adds. Thiesfeld encourages new anglers to check the "Fish Washington" feature at the department's webpage (http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/washington) for details on lake fishing opportunities. The map-based webpage includes fishing information by county, lake and fish species throughout the state. For those who want more fishing advice, Thiesfeld recommends "how to" fishing videos also available at the department's webpage (http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/washington/videos). Of more than 7,000 lakes, ponds and reservoirs in Washington, nearly 700 have WDFW-managed water-access sites, including areas accessible for people with disabilities. Other state and federal agencies operate hundreds more. Details on water access site locations can be found on WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/lands/water_access/. Anglers parking at WDFW water-access sites are required to display on their vehicle the WDFW Vehicle Access Pass that is provided free with every annual fishing license purchased. The passes are transferable between two vehicles. Anglers who use Washington State Parks or Department of Natural Resource areas need a Discover Pass. Information on the pass can be found at http://discoverpass.wa.gov/ Before heading out, anglers should check fishing regulations on WDFW's webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/ WDFW employees and their immediate families are not eligible to claim fishing derby prizes. Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list. Visit the WDFW News Release Archive at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/ To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html - 4:02 p.m. 3/30/2017
Hundreds of lowland lakes open April
22
with new opportunities to pull in
prize fish

OLYMPIA–Trout fishing in Washington
reaches full speed April 22, when
several hundred lowland lakes –
stocked with millions of fish – open
for a six-month season.

That date also marks the start of the
Washington Department of Fish and
Wildlife's (WDFW) annual lowland lake
fishing derby, which runs through
Oct. 31.

"Although many lakes are open year-
round, the fourth Saturday in April
marks the traditional start of the
lowland lakes fishing season, when
hundreds of thousands of anglers are
expected to turn out to fish," said
Steve Thiesfeld, WDFW inland fish
program manager.

To participate, Washington anglers
must have an annual freshwater or
combination fishing license valid
through March 31, 2018. Licenses can
be purchased online at
https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov; by
telephone at 1-866-246-9453; or at
hundreds of license dealers across
the state. For details on license
vendor locations, visit the WDFW
website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/licensing/vendors/

Anglers who catch one of 1,000 tagged
fish can also claim prizes provided
by license dealers and other sponsors
located across the state. The total
value of prizes is more than $25,000.
For a list of lakes with prize fish
and details on how to claim prizes,
visit
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/derby/

WDFW fish hatchery crews have been
stocking more than 16 million trout
and kokanee in lakes statewide. Those
fish include 2.3 million catchable
trout, nearly 150,000 larger trout
averaging about one pound apiece, and
millions of smaller trout that were
stocked last year and have grown to
catchable size.

Fish stocking details, by county and
lake, are available in the annual
stocking plan on WDFW's website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/sta
tewide/

Opening weekend is a time when
success rates are likely to be
higher, says Thiesfeld.

"When I was a kid, I had a difficult
time sleeping the night before
opening day. It's so exciting to get
out there and fish, and opening
weekend is just an excellent time to
introduce fishing to kids and
beginners," he adds.

Thiesfeld encourages new anglers to
check the "Fish Washington" feature
at the department's webpage
(http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/washingto
n) for details on lake fishing
opportunities. The map-based webpage
includes fishing information by
county, lake and fish species
throughout the state.

For those who want more fishing
advice, Thiesfeld recommends "how to"
fishing videos also available at the
department's webpage
(http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/washingto
n/videos).

Of more than 7,000 lakes, ponds and
reservoirs in Washington, nearly 700
have WDFW-managed water-access sites,
including areas accessible for people
with disabilities. Other state and
federal agencies operate hundreds
more.

Details on water access site
locations can be found on WDFW's
website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lands/water_access
/.

Anglers parking at WDFW water-access
sites are required to display on
their vehicle the WDFW Vehicle Access
Pass that is provided free with every
annual fishing license purchased. The
passes are transferable between two
vehicles.

Anglers who use Washington State
Parks or Department of Natural
Resource areas need a Discover Pass.
Information on the pass can be found
at http://discoverpass.wa.gov/

Before heading out, anglers should
check fishing regulations on WDFW's
webpage at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulation
s/

WDFW employees and their immediate
families are not eligible to claim
fishing derby prizes.

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to the
WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the WDFW News Release Archive
at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing
list:
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.
html

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Razor clam dig alternates between two beaches beginning March 30 OLYMPIA – State shellfish managers have approved a morning razor clam dig starting March 30 with openings alternating between Mocrocks and Copalis beaches through April 2. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the four-day dig – the first dig of the season on morning tides – after marine toxin tests showed that clams on those two beaches are safe to eat. Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, said diggers should be aware that only one beach – either Mocrocks or Copalis – will be open each day of the upcoming dig. Ayres also reminds diggers that all state fishing licenses expire March 31, so they will need to purchase a 2017-18 fishing license if they plan to participate in the digs approved for Saturday, April 1, and Sunday, April 2. Licenses applicable to digging razor clams include an annual razor clam license, a shellfish license or a combination fishing license. A three-day razor clam license is also available, although it is restricted to digging days in a single licensing year. All licenses are available online at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov/ and from sporting goods stores and other licensing outlets throughout the state. The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates and morning low tides: March 30, Thursday, 8:58 a.m.; -0.6 feet, Mocrocks March 31, Friday, 9:47 a.m.; -0.6 feet, Copalis April 1, Saturday, 10:40 a.m.; -0.5 feet, Mocrocks April 2, Sunday; 11:39 a.m., -0.1 feet, Copalis Long Beach and Twin Harbors remain closed to digging, because they have not yet met state testing requirements for marine toxins, Ayres said. Copalis Beach extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas. Mocrocks Beach extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips. Maps of those beaches and information about razor clam digs proposed in the future are available on WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information - 1:03 p.m. 3/29/2017
Razor clam dig alternates between two
beaches beginning March 30

OLYMPIA – State shellfish managers
have approved a morning razor clam
dig starting March 30 with openings
alternating between Mocrocks and
Copalis beaches through April 2.

The Washington Department of Fish and
Wildlife (WDFW) approved the four-day
dig – the first dig of the season on
morning tides – after marine toxin
tests showed that clams on those two
beaches are safe to eat.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish
manager, said diggers should be aware
that only one beach – either Mocrocks
or Copalis – will be open each day of
the upcoming dig.

Ayres also reminds diggers that all
state fishing licenses expire March
31, so they will need to purchase a
2017-18 fishing license if they plan
to participate in the digs approved
for Saturday, April 1, and Sunday,
April 2.

Licenses applicable to digging razor
clams include an annual razor clam
license, a shellfish license or a
combination fishing license. A three-
day razor clam license is also
available, although it is restricted
to digging days in a single licensing
year.

All licenses are available online at
https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov/ and from
sporting goods stores and other
licensing outlets throughout the
state.

The upcoming dig is approved on the
following beaches, dates and morning
low tides:

March 30, Thursday, 8:58 a.m.; -0.6
feet, Mocrocks
March 31, Friday, 9:47 a.m.; -0.6
feet, Copalis
April 1, Saturday, 10:40 a.m.; -0.5
feet, Mocrocks
April 2, Sunday; 11:39 a.m., -0.1
feet, Copalis
Long Beach and Twin Harbors remain
closed to digging, because they have
not yet met state testing
requirements for marine toxins, Ayres
said.

Copalis Beach extends from the Grays
Harbor north jetty to the Copalis
River and includes the Copalis, Ocean
Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis
areas.

Mocrocks Beach extends from the
Copalis River to the southern
boundary of the Quinault Reservation
near the Moclips River, including
Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach,
Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.

Maps of those beaches and information
about razor clam digs proposed in the
future are available on WDFW's
website at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/
razorclams/current.html

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to the
WDFW All Information

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

cool stuff - 5:17 p.m. 3/19/2017
Hope this is ok Noel.

Sportsman's in Kelso is having some
awesome events coming up.

March 25 Springer Seminar with
Clancy Holt and CCA
April 6th Ladies Night with
Ashley Nichole Lewis. Ashley will be giving
away a E6X with Shimano Nasci reel.
Featuring Brad's and Pro-Cure.
Springer Derby going on through May 1st
1st place $500 gift card
2nd place $100 gift card
3rd place $50 gift card
Fish must be gutted and gilled

Like our fb page for all upcoming events!

Thanks Noel

Gabe Boline

River level - 6:59 a.m. 3/15/2017
Thank you so much for giving us a heads up on the river level !!
Hats off to you !!!!

bobberdogger - battle ground wa

Viewing Fishing Reports 31-40 (296 reports)

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For fishing pictures go to LewisRiver.com monthy fishing pictures.
For more information go to Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Call 1.800.547.1501 for updated reservoir levels and estimated river flow below Merwin.
For N. F . Lewis River flow go to River Flows At Ariel.
For East Fork Lewis River flow go to East Fork Lewis River Near Heisson, Wa.

Stream flow and reservoir levels at:
Lewis River at Woodland       Speelyai Creek      Muddy Creek
Lewis River at Ariel      Lewis River Reservoir Levels

We are very pleased to offer you this fishing report site. Please only post reports or information that is of interest to all. Many people want a fast report and don't have time to read a lot of other stuff. Inappropriate posts will be deleted. Thanks, Noel Johnson.

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