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River Access Below Merwin Dam

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Summer salmon fishing: The fishery for summer chinook salmon, sockeye salmon and steelhead continues through July 31 on the mainstem Columbia River from the Astoria-Megler Bridge upstream to the Hwy. 395 Bridge in Pasco. Anglers can keep any sockeye they catch, but only hatchery-raised chinook and steelhead with a clipped adipose fin may be retained. The daily catch limit is six salmonids, including two adult hatchery salmon, or two hatchery steelhead, or one of each. Barbless hooks are required. Sockeye salmon count toward the daily limit, but there is no limit on the large number of shad currently moving up the Columbia River. Fishing for summer chinook has been decent from the Cathlamet River to Bonneville Dam since the season got under way June 16, said Joe Hymer, a WDFW fish biologist. Known for their size, some summer chinook have checked in this year at 30 to 40 pounds. Through June, nearly half of the 93,300 summer chinook projected to return this year had moved up the fish ladders at Bonneville Dam, but more remain available for harvest. Last year's preseason forecast was 73,000 fish, with an actual return of 126,900. Meanwhile, the count of sockeye salmon at the dam has skyrocketed, with more than a quarter-million fish tallied through June. Fishery managers are now projecting a return of 400,000 sockeye, up substantially from the 101,600-fish preseason forecast. Averaging about five pounds apiece, sockeye are great on the grill but can prove challenging to catch, Hymer said. To get them to bite, he recommends baiting up with shrimp (their preferred prey in the ocean) and downsizing your gear. Summer steelhead: Anglers are also catching hatchery steelhead near the mouths of several rivers and farther upstream as well. Some 256,400 upriver summer steelhead are expected to pass Bonneville Dam this year, amounting to about 77 percent of the 10-year average. Lower river summer steelhead returns have averaged 62,500 fish over the past 10 years. Below Bonneville Dam, Hymer's top choice for summer steelhead is the Cowlitz River, where fish start arriving in large numbers in early July. Other options include sections of the Kalama, North Fork Lewis, Washougal, South Fork Toutle, Green, and Elochoman rivers. Above the dam, Hymer recommends Drano Lake and the lower Wind River, where steelhead historically dip in to beat the heat. The Klickitat River can also produce some good catches. In the Columbia River, the daily limit is six salmonids, including two hatchery steelhead, or two adult hatchery chinook, or one of each. Barbless hooks are required. Daily limits for tributaries to the Columbia River are listed in the new 2016-17 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet, now available online or from license vendors throughout the state. Sturgeon: All waters below McNary Dam are now closed to sturgeon retention, although catch-and-release fishing is permitted in areas not designated as spawning sanctuaries. The best spot for anglers who want to catch and keep white sturgeon is farther upriver in the Wanapum and Priest Rapids reservoirs. For more information on those new fisheries, see the Fishing Rule Change on WDFW's website. Shad: July is prime time to catch shad, the largest member of the herring family. Weighing up to 8 pounds apiece, millions of them have begun moving up the Columbia River. Shad are fairly easy to catch and there are no daily limits. Tips on where, when, and how to catch and prepare shad are available on WDFW's website. Trout: July is a great time to catch some trout and beat the heat at high lakes in Southwest Washington. Whether you want to hike or drive, the WDFW website lists dozens of options throughout the region. John Weinheimer, a WDFW fish biologist, recommends Takhlakh and Council Lakes near Mt. Adams for those who want to drive to their fishing spot. "Both of these lakes are large, and will be stocked with thousands of large catchable rainbows by the Fourth of July weekend," Weinheimer said. "Takhlakh will also receive broodstock rainbow running 5-6 pounds apiece, and both of these lakes are terrific places to camp and fish." Weinheimer also recommends three large drive-up lakes in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. One is Horseshoe Lake, which contains eastern brook trout, browns, and tiger trout a sterile cross of the two. Big Mosquito Lake near Trout Lake also contains eastern brook and tiger trout, but boat access is largely limited to car-top boats and float tubes. Walupt Lake is a large lake, featuring wild cutthroat and rainbow with a great campground. Merwin Special Kids Day: Children with disabilities will have a chance to reel in some big trout during a special fishing event July 9 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Merwin Fish Hatchery, east of Woodland. Prior to the - 1:14 p.m. 7/1/2016
Summer salmon fishing: The fishery
for summer chinook salmon, sockeye
salmon and steelhead continues
through July 31 on the mainstem
Columbia River from the Astoria-
Megler Bridge upstream to the Hwy.
395 Bridge in Pasco. Anglers can keep
any sockeye they catch, but only
hatchery-raised chinook and steelhead
with a clipped adipose fin may be
retained.

The daily catch limit is six
salmonids, including two adult
hatchery salmon, or two hatchery
steelhead, or one of each. Barbless
hooks are required. Sockeye salmon
count toward the daily limit, but
there is no limit on the large number
of shad currently moving up the
Columbia River.

Fishing for summer chinook has been
decent from the Cathlamet River to
Bonneville Dam since the season got
under way June 16, said Joe Hymer, a
WDFW fish biologist. Known for their
size, some summer chinook have
checked in this year at 30 to 40
pounds.

Through June, nearly half of the
93,300 summer chinook projected to
return this year had moved up the
fish ladders at Bonneville Dam, but
more remain available for harvest.
Last year's preseason forecast was
73,000 fish, with an actual return of
126,900.

Meanwhile, the count of sockeye
salmon at the dam has skyrocketed,
with more than a quarter-million fish
tallied through June. Fishery
managers are now projecting a return
of 400,000 sockeye, up substantially
from the 101,600-fish preseason
forecast.

Averaging about five pounds apiece,
sockeye are great on the grill but
can prove challenging to catch, Hymer
said. To get them to bite, he
recommends baiting up with shrimp
(their preferred prey in the ocean)
and downsizing your gear.

Summer steelhead: Anglers are also
catching hatchery steelhead near the
mouths of several rivers and
farther upstream as well. Some
256,400 upriver summer steelhead are
expected to pass Bonneville Dam this
year, amounting to about 77 percent
of the 10-year average. Lower river
summer steelhead returns have
averaged 62,500 fish over the past 10
years.

Below Bonneville Dam, Hymer's top
choice for summer steelhead is the
Cowlitz River, where fish start
arriving in large numbers in early
July. Other options include sections
of the Kalama, North Fork Lewis,
Washougal, South Fork Toutle, Green,
and Elochoman rivers.

Above the dam, Hymer recommends Drano
Lake and the lower Wind River, where
steelhead historically dip in to beat
the heat. The Klickitat River can
also produce some good catches.

In the Columbia River, the daily
limit is six salmonids, including two
hatchery steelhead, or two adult
hatchery chinook, or one of each.
Barbless hooks are required. Daily
limits for tributaries to the
Columbia River are listed in the new
2016-17 Washington Sport Fishing
Rules pamphlet, now available online
or from license vendors throughout
the state.

Sturgeon: All waters below McNary Dam
are now closed to sturgeon retention,
although catch-and-release fishing is
permitted in areas not designated as
spawning sanctuaries. The best spot
for anglers who want to catch and
keep white sturgeon is farther
upriver in the Wanapum and Priest
Rapids reservoirs. For more
information on those new fisheries,
see the Fishing Rule Change on WDFW's
website.

Shad: July is prime time to catch
shad, the largest member of the
herring family. Weighing up to 8
pounds apiece, millions of them have
begun moving up the Columbia River.
Shad are fairly easy to catch and
there are no daily limits. Tips on
where, when, and how to catch and
prepare shad are available on WDFW's
website.

Trout: July is a great time to catch
some trout and beat the heat at
high lakes in Southwest Washington.
Whether you want to hike or drive,
the WDFW website lists dozens of
options throughout the region.

John Weinheimer, a WDFW fish
biologist, recommends Takhlakh and
Council Lakes near Mt. Adams for
those who want to drive to their
fishing spot.

"Both of these lakes are large, and
will be stocked with thousands of
large catchable rainbows by the
Fourth of July weekend," Weinheimer
said. "Takhlakh will also receive
broodstock rainbow running 5-6 pounds
apiece, and both of these lakes are
terrific places to camp and fish."

Weinheimer also recommends three
large drive-up lakes in the Gifford
Pinchot National Forest. One is
Horseshoe Lake, which contains
eastern brook trout, browns, and
tiger trout a sterile cross of the
two. Big Mosquito Lake near Trout
Lake also contains eastern brook and
tiger trout, but boat access is
largely limited to car-top boats and
float tubes. Walupt Lake is a large
lake, featuring wild cutthroat and
rainbow with a great campground.

Merwin Special Kids Day: Children
with disabilities will have a chance
to reel in some big trout during a
special fishing event July 9 from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Merwin Fish
Hatchery, east of Woodland.

Prior to the

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

fish - 11:18 a.m. 7/1/2016
I have landed 3 out of 17 in June.
No, I will not mention where or how.
There are fish available for those
who have learned. Those who want to
learn need to spend the many years
learning, like we all had to do.
Learning isn't accomplished sitting
on the computer, it's out there on
the river , getting nothing more
often than getting.

alan - washougal wa
alnnn@aol.com

Lower Lewis river plunking - 10:07 p.m. 6/30/2016
Helo Harold
I have see massage you from . Yes I having good luk on fishing with the lewis rivar. I been catchink steel heads with cookies and large hooks. On big rock across the hatchery.
I see you there.
Harvey

Harvey English - Woodland

Nfl Chinook - 6:20 p.m. 6/30/2016
No you can't keep Chinook on the Lewis
river currently. If you go to the wdfw
website you can look up all special
rules and regulations

Jeff - Vancouver wa

WDFW restricts fires on eastern Washington lands OLYMPIA The arrival of hot, dry weather has prompted the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to restrict fires and other activities beginning July 1 on agency-managed lands in eastern Washington. Clay Sprague, manager of the WDFW Lands Division, said the department is taking steps to reduce the risk of fire in its wildlife areas and access areas. "Following fire restrictions and exercising common sense are the most important steps people can take to preserve public recreation lands and wildlife habitat," Sprague said. The department has issued an emergency order that imposes restrictions beginning July 1 on agency lands east of the Cascades. The new rule prohibits: Fires or campfires, including those in fire rings, although personal camp stoves and lanterns fueled by propane, liquid petroleum or liquid petroleum gas are allowed. Smoking, except in an enclosed vehicle. Welding and the use of chainsaws. Operating a torch with an open flame and all equipment powered by an internal combustion engine is prohibited. Operating a motor vehicle away from developed roads. Parking is permitted within designated parking areas, including developed campgrounds and trailheads; and in areas without vegetation that are within 10 feet of roadways. Fireworks are prohibited year-round at all 33 WDFW wildlife areas and 700-plus water access sites around the state. So is throwing a lit cigarette or any other burning material from a motor vehicle on a state highway. WDFW owns and manages over 700,000 acres in eastern Washington. The restrictions in these areas will remain in effect until conditions improve and the risk of wildfires decreases, Sprague said. Any changes will be posted on the department's website: http://wdfw.wa.gov The Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is implementing fire restrictions in eastern Washington on July 2. For more information about fires and fire prevention on public lands, visit the DNR website (http://www.dnr.wa.gov) or the U.S. Forest Service website (http://www.fs.usda.gov). Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list. Visit the WDFW News Release Archive at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/ To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list: http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.html - 3:33 p.m. 6/30/2016
WDFW restricts fires on eastern
Washington lands

OLYMPIA The arrival of hot, dry
weather has prompted the Washington
Department of Fish and Wildlife
(WDFW) to restrict fires and other
activities beginning July 1 on
agency-managed lands in eastern
Washington.

Clay Sprague, manager of the WDFW
Lands Division, said the department
is taking steps to reduce the risk of
fire in its wildlife areas and access
areas.

"Following fire restrictions and
exercising common sense are the most
important steps people can take to
preserve public recreation lands and
wildlife habitat," Sprague said.

The department has issued an
emergency order that imposes
restrictions beginning July 1 on
agency lands east of the Cascades.
The new rule prohibits:

Fires or campfires, including those
in fire rings, although personal camp
stoves and lanterns fueled by
propane, liquid petroleum or liquid
petroleum gas are allowed.
Smoking, except in an enclosed
vehicle.
Welding and the use of chainsaws.
Operating a torch with an open flame
and all equipment powered by an
internal combustion engine is
prohibited.
Operating a motor vehicle away from
developed roads. Parking is permitted
within designated parking areas,
including developed campgrounds and
trailheads; and in areas without
vegetation that are within 10 feet of
roadways.
Fireworks are prohibited year-round
at all 33 WDFW wildlife areas and
700-plus water access sites around
the state. So is throwing a lit
cigarette or any other burning
material from a motor vehicle on a
state highway.

WDFW owns and manages over 700,000
acres in eastern Washington. The
restrictions in these areas will
remain in effect until conditions
improve and the risk of wildfires
decreases, Sprague said. Any changes
will be posted on the department's
website: http://wdfw.wa.gov

The Washington Department of Natural
Resources (DNR) is implementing fire
restrictions in eastern Washington on
July 2. For more information about
fires and fire prevention on public
lands, visit the DNR website
(http://www.dnr.wa.gov) or the U.S.
Forest Service website
(http://www.fs.usda.gov).

Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.


-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------

This message has been sent to the
WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the WDFW News Release Archive
at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing
list:
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.
html

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

springers - 9:59 a.m. 6/30/2016
Can you keep chinook out on the Lewis river right
now? Thanks

aaron - Washington
tommygunmanrex@gmail.com

Steel Head - 3:18 p.m. 6/29/2016
Hey Washington Buddies!
It's been a while since we chatted. My Portland friends and I have been doing fantastic on the Lewis lately. There were 7 of us a few days ago, and we caught 3 natives and 4 hatcheries! WooHoo! At Johnson Crk, and also a secret spot...shhhh...
We got them on pink worms, and also pink corkies...(they match my fishing pole) ;)

We'll all be fishing the Lewis a lot this summer, fall and winter, so if you see the rainbow van...say Hello!

Tight Fishing Lines,
Douglas

Douglas Bradford - Portland, OR

Ocean salmon fishery opens July 1 OLYMPIA Anglers can reel in salmon off the Washington coast beginning July 1, when the ocean sport fishery gets underway daily in all four marine areas. This year's sport fishing opportunities are mostly focused on chinook salmon, which are forecast to return at a rate slightly above the 10-year average, said Wendy Beeghley, an ocean salmon manager with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Anglers can fish for chinook in all four marine areas. "We expect a pretty good chinook fishery in the ocean this summer," Beeghley said. "However, we've put restrictions in place in an effort to protect coho, which are forecast to return in low numbers." Only Marine Area 1 (Ilwaco) will be open for coho retention. Fishery managers have attributed the low number of returning coho to poor ocean conditions last year. This year's 18,900 coho quota is a significant reduction from the 150,800 fish quota in 2015 and the lowest coho quota since 1998. The recreational chinook catch quota this year is 35,000 fish, down from 64,000 in 2015. Marine Area 1 is scheduled to close Aug. 31 while marine areas 2 (Westport), 3 (La Push) and 4 (Neah Bay) are scheduled to close Aug. 21. Fisheries may close sooner than scheduled if the quota is met. Throughout the summer, anglers can check WDFW's webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/ for updates on the ocean fishery. In Marine Area 1, anglers will have a daily limit of two salmon, only one of which can be a chinook. Anglers fishing in Marine Area 2 can retain one salmon daily. In marine areas 3 and 4, anglers will have a two-salmon daily limit. Anglers will be required to release all coho salmon in marine areas 2, 3 and 4, but can keep hatchery coho in Marine Area 1. Additional information on fishing regulations can be found in Washington's Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet, available on WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/ Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html. - 9:37 a.m. 6/29/2016
Ocean salmon fishery opens July 1

OLYMPIA Anglers can reel in salmon
off the Washington coast beginning
July 1, when the ocean sport fishery
gets underway daily in all four
marine areas.

This year's sport fishing
opportunities are mostly focused on
chinook salmon, which are forecast to
return at a rate slightly above the
10-year average, said Wendy Beeghley,
an ocean salmon manager with the
Washington Department of Fish and
Wildlife (WDFW). Anglers can fish
for chinook in all four marine areas.

"We expect a pretty good chinook
fishery in the ocean this summer,"
Beeghley said. "However, we've put
restrictions in place in an effort to
protect coho, which are forecast to
return in low numbers."

Only Marine Area 1 (Ilwaco) will be
open for coho retention. Fishery
managers have attributed the low
number of returning coho to poor
ocean conditions last year.

This year's 18,900 coho quota is a
significant reduction from the
150,800 fish quota in 2015 and the
lowest coho quota since 1998. The
recreational chinook catch quota this
year is 35,000 fish, down from 64,000
in 2015.

Marine Area 1 is scheduled to close
Aug. 31 while marine areas 2
(Westport), 3 (La Push) and 4 (Neah
Bay) are scheduled to close Aug. 21.
Fisheries may close sooner than
scheduled if the quota is met.
Throughout the summer, anglers can
check WDFW's webpage at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/ for updates on
the ocean fishery.

In Marine Area 1, anglers will have a
daily limit of two salmon, only one
of which can be a chinook. Anglers
fishing in Marine Area 2 can retain
one salmon daily. In marine areas 3
and 4, anglers will have a two-salmon
daily limit. Anglers will be required
to release all coho salmon in marine
areas 2, 3 and 4, but can keep
hatchery coho in Marine Area 1.

Additional information on fishing
regulations can be found in
Washington's Sport Fishing Rules
pamphlet, available on WDFW's website
at
http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulation
s/


Persons with disabilities who need to
receive this information in an
alternative format or who need
reasonable accommodations to
participate in WDFW-sponsored public
meetings or other activities may
contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-
902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or
email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For
more information, see
http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reas
onable_request.html.

Noel Johnson - Woodland
Noel@lewisriver.com
www.lewisriver.com

Lower Lewis river plunking - 7:07 a.m. 6/29/2016
Hello everyone :)

I wondering have everyone having
luck down the lower lewis river for
steelhead plunking this week ?

Harold Dunning - Longview, washington

Pumps are producing - 4:56 p.m. 6/28/2016
Starting to catch them at the pumps
pretty consistently with bobbers and
nightmares.

Josh Wright - Woodland, WA
joshwright1981@gmail.com

Viewing Fishing Reports 31-40 (155 reports)

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For fishing pictures go to LewisRiver.com monthy fishing pictures.
For more information go to Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Call 1.800.547.1501 for updated reservoir levels and estimated river flow below Merwin.
For N. F . Lewis River flow go to River Flows At Ariel.
For East Fork Lewis River flow go to East Fork Lewis River Near Heisson, Wa.

Stream flow and reservoir levels at:
Lewis River at Woodland       Speelyai Creek      Muddy Creek
Lewis River at Ariel      Lewis River Reservoir Levels

We are very pleased to offer you this fishing report site. Please only post reports or information that is of interest to all. Many people want a fast report and don't have time to read a lot of other stuff. Inappropriate posts will be deleted. Thanks, Noel Johnson.

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